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" To each his sufferings: all are men, Condemned alike to groan; The tender for another's pain, The unfeeling for his own. Yet, ah! why should they know their fate? Since sorrow never comes too late, And happiness too swiftly flies. Thought would destroy... "
The Edinburgh Magazine and Literary Miscellany - 7. oldal
1821
Teljes nézet - Információ erről a könyvről

English Poems: The restoration and the eighteenth century (1660-1800)

Walter Cochrane Bronson - 1908
...fill the band, That numbs the soul with icy hand, And slow-consuming Age. 9° To each his suff'rings ; all are men, Condemned alike to groan — The tender for another's pain, Th' unfeeling for his own. Yet, ah, why should they know their fate? 95 Since sorrow never comes too...

The Pageant of English Poetry

Robert Maynard Leonard - 1909 - 606 oldal
...ambush ' stand To seize their prey the murtherous band ! Ah, tell them, they are men ! To each his sufferings : all are men, Condemned alike to groan,...The tender for another's pain ; The unfeeling for his own. Yet, ah ! why should they know their fate ? Since sorrow never comes too late, And happiness...

The Treasure Book of Verse: Being a Reissue of Poetry for Home and School

Anna Callender Brackett - 1909 - 320 oldal
...Lo, Poverty, to fill the band, That numbs the soul with icy hand, And slow consuming age. To each his sufferings ; all are men, Condemned alike to groan ; The tender for another's pain, Th' unfeeling for his own. Yet, ah ! why should they know their fate, Since sorrow never comes too...

Poems that Have Helped Me

1911 - 64 oldal
...thought and men of action, Clear the way ! — Charlts Mackay WHERE IGNORANCE IS BLISS •^O each his sufferings: all are men, ^^ Condemned alike to groan; The tender for another's pain, The unfeeling for his own. Yet, ah! why should they know their fate Since sorrow never comes too late, And happiness...

The Home Book of Verse, American and English ..., 6. kötet,2121-2726. oldal

1912 - 3742 oldal
...Lo! Poverty, to fill the band, That numbs the soul with icy hand, And slow-consuming Age. To each his sufferings: all are men, Condemned alike to groan; The tender for another's pain, The unfeeling for his own. Yet, ah! why should they know their fate, Since sorrow never comes too late, And happiness...

The Wesleyan-Methodist Magazine

1882
...best a chequered scene, and human joy at the most a bitter-sweet. ' To each his sufferings ; all arc men Condemned alike to groan, — The tender for another's pain, The unfeeling for his own.' Not that all are burdened alike, though all alike are burdened. There are great visible differences...

A Book of English Literature, Selected and Ed, 1. kötet

Franklyn Bliss Snyder, Robert Grant Martin - 1916 - 889 oldal
...Poverty, to fill the band, That numbs the soul with icy hand, And slow-consuming Age. 90 To each his us, avoid indeed as much as possible any invidious comparison between the merits of humane letters his own. Yet ah! why should they know their fate? Since sorrow never comes too late, 96 And happiness...

English Poets of the Eighteenth Century

Ernest Bernbaum - 1918 - 364 oldal
...Lo, Poverty, to fill the band, That numbs the soul with icy hand, And slow-consuming Age. To each his sufferings; all are men, Condemned alike to groan, The tender for another's pain; The unfeeling for his own. Yet, ah! why should they know their fate, Since sorrow never comes too late, And happiness...

The Modern Student's Book of English Literature

Harry Morgan Ayres - 1924 - 898 oldal
...Lo, Poverty, to fill the band, That numbs the soul with icy hand, And slow-consuming Age. To each his whose fountains are within. IV O Lady, we receive but what we give, And in our life alone does Natu his own. Yet ah ! why should they know their fate? Since sorrow never comes too late, And happiness...

Essays and Studies, 4. kötet

English Association - 1913
...on its gray incidents. The \ pathetic elements in life force themselves always upon him. To each his sufferings ; all are men Condemned alike to groan, The tender for another's pain, The unfeeling for his own. The balance of effect in Mr. Galsworthy's work is never \ on the side of happiness. In Joy,...




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