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Könyvek 151 / 121 - 130. könyv a(z) Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk... kifejezésre.
" Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like a Colossus ; and we petty men Walk under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. "
King Lear: A Tragedy in Five Acts - 13. oldal
szerző: William Shakespeare, Nahum Tate, Mrs. Inchbald - 1808 - 78 oldal
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Pulling Faces, Making Noises: A Life on Stage, Screen & Radio

Barry Morse - 2004 - 422 oldal
...Jacqueline Scott, myself and Arlene Martel. Photograph by Robert E. Wood. 14 HOW THE OTHER HALF LIVES "Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like...about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at sometime are masters of their fates. The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves,...
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The Social Life of Emotions

Larissa Z. Tiedens, Colin Wayne Leach, Keith Oatley - 2004 - 360 oldal
...Cassius, a literary prototype of the envying person, as he protests the honors being heaped on Caesar: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...under his huge legs and peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves. (Shakespeare, 1599/1934, p. 41) These words show an important quality of envy....
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Going Deeper: How to Make Sense of Your Life when Your Life Makes No Sense

Jean-Claude Koven - 2004 - 436 oldal
..."Let me offer instead Julius Caesar — liberally paraphrased, I might add, by William Shakespeare: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...under his huge legs and peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves. Men at some time are masters of their fates: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in...
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Middlemarch: A Study of Provincial Life

George Eliot - 2004 - 744 oldal
...224 BCE. There is an echo here of Shakespeare's Julius Caesar (1623), Act 1, Scene 2, lines 133-35: "Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world/ Like...under his huge legs, and peep about/ To find ourselves dishonorable graves." Controlled bleeding and raising of blisters, treatments associated with the outmoded...
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Take the Rich Off Welfare

Mark Zepezauer - 2004 - 183 oldal
...Two: Big Business Breaks FOOP STAMPS Tax Avoidance by Transnationals ($137.2 billion a year) UUhy. man, he doth bestride the narrow world like a colossus,...under his huge legs, and peep about to find ourselves dishonorable graves."1 Cassius's description of Caesar is hard to beat for giving the flavor of how...
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In The Footsteps of Churchill

Richard Holmes - 2009 - 376 oldal
...the Americans.8 The words Shakespeare put in the mouth of thoroughly modern Cassius spring to mind: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world, Like...about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. Men at some time are masters of their fate: The fault, dear Brutus, is not in our stars, But in ourselves...
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The Problem Plays of Shakespeare: A Study of Julius Caesar, Measure for ...

Ernest Schanzer - 2005 - 196 oldal
...Caesar's greatness dwarfs his own achievements, and makes it impossible for him to gain glory and renown. Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. (1.2.135-8) 'Honour', a word which occupies the same central position in this play as does 'honesty'...
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Shakespeare's Early Tragedies

Nicholas Brooke - 2005 - 232 oldal
...again on the shouts off-stage - and Cassius completes his peroration with a superbly grotesque image: Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...peep about To find ourselves dishonourable graves. (133-6) The movement from the Marlowan 'Like a Colossus' to the physical particularity of 'huge legs'...
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Exploring 1 & 2 Thessalonians: An Expository Commentary

John Phillips - 2005 - 240 oldal
...the plot to murder Julius Caesar, Shakespeare has Cassius complain to Brutus, Caesar's close friend: Why man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...under his huge legs, and peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves. But Caesar, as ambitious as he was, was nothing compared with what the Antichrist...
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Julius Caesar

William Shakespeare - 2005 - 239 oldal
...shout! I do believe that these applauses are 140 For some new honors that are heaped on Caesar. CASSIUS Why, man, he doth bestride the narrow world Like a...under his huge legs and peep about To find ourselves dishonorable graves. 145 Men at some time are masters of their fates. The fault, dear Brutus, is not...
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