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Könyvek 83 / 11 - 20. könyv a(z) Along with whatever any intelligence knows it must, as the ground or condition of... kifejezésre.
" Along with whatever any intelligence knows it must, as the ground or condition of its knowledge, have some cognisance of itself. "
Recent British Philosophy: A Review, with Criticisms; Including Some ... - 270. oldal
szerző: David Masson - 1865 - 414 oldal
Teljes nézet - Információ erről a könyvről

The Eclectic Magazine: Foreign Literature, 42. kötet

1857
...which is not demonstrated, but taken as self-evident, is that which stands first in the work, namely, "Along with whatever any intelligence knows, it must,...the ground or condition of its knowledge, have some cognizance of itself." This proposition is the beginning and the end, the sun, soul, and center of...

An inquiry into the constitution, powers, and processes of the human mind ...

William Robinson Pirie - 1858 - 640 oldal
...with everything else. We now come to his propositions, and the first is to the following effect—" along with whatever " any intelligence knows, it must,...its knowledge, have some cognisance " of itself." b Now, there is no attempt at a demonstration of this; it is taken for granted, and in this breaks...

The Collected Works of Dugald Stewart: Biographical memoirs of Adam Smith ...

Dugald Stewart, John Veitch - 1858
...The essential condition of knowledge, according to this author, is contained in the principle, that " along with whatever any intelligence knows, it must,...condition of its knowledge, have some cognisance of itself."1 And of this principle he professes to find the guarantee in the law of Contradiction. The...

An Inquiry Into the Constitution, Powers, and Processes of the Human Mind ...

William Robinson Pirie - 1858 - 640 oldal
...with everything else. We now come to his propositions, and the first is to the following effect — " along with whatever " any intelligence knows, it must,...condition of its knowledge, have some cognisance " of itself."b Now, there is no attempt at a demonstration of this ; it is taken for granted, and in this...

The emotions and the will

Alexander Bain - 1859
...exposition like his, ought to be free from the slightest flaw. The proposition is expressed thus : 'Along with whatever any intelligence knows, it must,...the ground or condition of its knowledge, have some cognizance of itself.' What I dissent from is the placing of self in the relationship of a factor or...

THE JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGICAL MEDICINE AND MENTAL PATHOLOGY

FORBES WINSLOW - 1860
...try Professor Ferrier's theory in three special instances, selecting that portion of his axiom, [' Along with whatever any intelligence knows, it must,...the ground or condition of its knowledge, have some cognizance of itself :'] which, as limited to human consciousness, is unquestionably true. " 1. Whatever...

Instinct and Reason; Or, The First Principles of Human Knowledge

George Ramsay - 1862 - 136 oldal
...an ingenious writer of the present day, as contained in his " Theory of Knowing and Being," that " Along with whatever any intelligence knows, it must,...of its knowledge, have some cognisance of itself." Yes, along with whatever any intelligence knows; but this does not prove that selfknowledge is a necessary...

The Emotions and the Will

Alexander Bain - 1865 - 616 oldal
...subject of his book, being the main theme of metaphysical dispute. I believe it correct to say, first, 'Along with whatever any intelligence knows, it must,...condition of its knowledge, have some cognisance of a quality in contrast to what is known.' It is the contrast that really determines what the knowledge...

Time and Space: A Metaphysical Essay

Shadworth Hollway Hodgson - 1865 - 587 oldal
...are the Subject and the Object. " Along with whatever any intelligence knows," says Prof. Ferrier, " it must, as the ground or condition of its knowledge, have some cognisance of itself." Institutes of Metaphysic, Sect. i. Prop. i. Every phenomenon according to this, whatever other elements...

The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal, 124. kötet

1866
...Ferrier, in his exquisitely beautiful and subtle ' Institutes of Metaphysics.' He only postulates that along with whatever any intelligence knows, it must,...the ground or condition of its knowledge, have some consciousness of itself (the dualism of Hamilton) ; and from this he proceeds to prove by a series...




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