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Crystal Palace.—Mad. Clara Novello's second and last farewell performance came off on Saturday, when the Messiah was given. The audience was even more numerous than at the first concert on Wednesday, their numbers amounting to between fourteen and fifteen thousand. The execution of Handel's great work, on the whole, was not irreproachable. The band and chorus had had no rehearsals together, and did not go always as smoothly as might have been desired; and the organist, Mr. J. Coward, was now and then at fault from the same cause. Mr. Benedict, the conductor, did all in his power to achieve a perfect performance; and if his efforts could have tended to such a result he would have accomplished it. The managers of the concert, doubtless, conceived that as the entire interest would be absorbed in Mad. Novello's singing, it would hardly be worth while taking any extra trouble, or going to any extra expense. In that case, they should not have procured so large a choral and instrumental force, nor have vaunted so much about their numbers and efficiency in the advertisements. To bring together such a phalanx was a waste of time and material, unless they were brought together for good purpose. The execution of the Messiah, we repeat, was by no means first-rate, a thin^ to be reprehended, the more so as it was within the possibility of accomplishment. On such an occasion, we are inclined to think it especially behoved the directors of the Crystal Palace to see that every pains was taken to ensure a satisfactory, if not a great, performance. That such was not attained was no fault of the soloists, all of whom not only sang their best, but were in the best condition to do so. Indeed, we do not remember to have heard the solos more admirably rendered than they were on Saturday by Mad. Clara Novello, Mad. Sainton-Dolby, Mr. Wilbye Cooper, and Mr. Santley. Of course complaints were made as usual by persons not being able to hear, even in the reserved places; and we must own, that from block K K we ourselves were unable to catch, with any distinctness, the florid passages in "Every valley shall be!exalted," and "Why do the nations so furiously rage together?" sung respectively by Messrs. Wilbye Cooper and Santley. This, we are assured, was no fault of the singers. The oftener we hear music in the central transept of the Crystal Palace, the more we are convinced it is not suited, in its present state, for the equable transmission of sound; and that, as a concert-room, the most radical alterations are imperatively called for. However, on Saturday, the visitors seemed to think little about acoustical properties, Handel's music, or anything except the fair songstress who sat before them for the last time, and who never again was to pour her divine warblings into their ears in the same place. Such considerations, indeed, were sufficient to stifle all grumbling and fault-finding, and to arrest attention to one point. The demonstration in favour of the artist was more intense than enthusiastic. The audience being for the most part composed of the gentler sex, precluded that vehement display and external ebullition of feeling, which must be sought for in other localities than in the Crystal Palace on special occasions. Mad. Novello, indeed, was received on her appearance with genuine warmth, and the thrill of admiration that went through the hearers like an electric-shock after "Rejoice greatly," "Come unto him," and "I know that myRedeemerliveth," was far stronger proof of the artist's power than the most boisterous acclamations. That Mad. Novello never sang [more exquisitely, never sang with greater command of voice in every way, and with more faultless intonation, was the universal opinion. So perfect a performance, perhaps, has never been remembered at any former leave-taking by any singer. So perfect, indeed, that the expression involuntarily came to every tongue, "Why does Mad. Novello think of retiring into private life?" It is fortunate for those who were unable to attend the two farewell performances at the Crystal Palace, that further opportunities will be offered them of hearing Mad. Novello in London, before her final retirement. Her real last appearance in publio will, we understand, take place in the metropolis.

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. AN EXTENSIVE ASSORTMENT

FOEEIGN PEINTED MUSIC,

IMPORTED FROM GERMANY, FRANCE, AND ITALY

DURING THB LABT 50 TSABI,

Including many Works out of Print and the Plates of which have been destroyed, TO BE SOLD AT

ONE FOURTH OF THE MARKED PRICES AFFIXED,

BY •

MESSRS. BOOSEY & SONS,

28 HOLLES STREET, OXFORD STREET.

In consequence fof their discontinuing: the Sale of Miscellaneous Foreign Printed Music and requiring the Room for other purposes;

RCHESTRE SYMPHONIES, OVERTURES,

DANCES, tec, 4c. * MILITARY and BRASS BAND MUSIC. VIOLIN CONCERTOS—Septuors, Quintetts, Quartetts, Trios, Duets, and Solos.

VIOLONCELLO and TENOR MUSIC for ditto, ditto. FLUTR MUSIC—Concertos, Septuors, Quintetts, Quartetts, &c. &c. CLARIONET, HAUTBOY, BORN, and BASSOON MUSIC, from Concertos to Solos." HAHP and GUITAR MUSIC, of all kinds.

PIANOFORTE MUSIC, from Concertos to Solos, Including an extensive assortment of Music for Four Hands. VOCAL MUSIC in Score, Oratorios, Operas, &c, &c. | Ditto, ditto, with Pianoforte accompaniment. THEORY and HISTORY of MUSIC.

Early applications are recommended as of many of the Works only ono or two Copies are left, and the whole Collection must be cleared off in the course of a short time. Hours of Sale from 10 to 4.

BOOSEY'S MUSICAL CABINET.—A New Series of SHILLING BOOKS of VOCAL and PIANOFORTE MUSIC —Eight Books are now ready.

OPINIONS OP THB PRESS:

"We had imagined" that the extreme point in cheap music had Ions since been attained; but that we were in error is proved by the present publication, which consists of a series of shilling quarto volumes embracing the best music of the best composers at a price below anything yet published ; admirable in typography, correct In the text, and as excellent a production as the musician could possibly desire, it is really a marvel of cheapness. In one volume we have twenty of Mendelssohn's songs; in another, twelve of Balfe's most popular songs; another embraces fourteen songs from Verdi's favourite operas: whilst another gives twenty of the Christy minstrel songs—so much for the vocal. The instrumental is no less extraordinary; for in one book we have fifty waltzes, chiefly by Laurent, Gungl, and Tinney ; another gives twelve quadrilles, by D'Albert, Laurent, Nordmann, &c.; another, fifty polkas and galops ; and another contains twenty-five of Verdi's gems for the pianoforte. Now, as all these are given at a shilling a volume, and as they are clear, distinct, and admirably printed, it is certain,v an event in musical publishing, and will attract much attention, as it affords every musician an opportunity of having the best music at the smallest price."— News qfthe World, Sept. 30th.

"Eight numbers have been forwarded to us of a work, called *■ Boosey's Musical Cabinet," which is a perfect marvel of cheapness, and is, moreover, brought out in as good a style as If four times the money were charged. It will scarcely be believed that No. 1, price one shilling, contains twenty of Mendelssohn's songs, not a cramped

fHinting of the mere melodies, or an arrangement of them for pianoforte or other nstrument, but the actual songs, with English words, either original, as in the case of the setting of some of Byron's lyrics, or translations by Messrs. Desmond Ryan, John Oxenford, and George Llniey, and with pianoforte accompaniment. The printing is clear, the paper is good, and the size convenient. No. 2 contains twelve songs by Balfe, including some of the settings of Longfellow; No. 3, fourteen by Verdi; No. 4, twenty of the Christy's Minstrel's songs ; and Nos. A, 6,7, and 8 contain pianoforte music, thus assorted—fifty waltzes, twelve sets of quadrilles, fifty polkas and galops, and twenty-five favourite morceaux from Verdi's operas. Thus all tastes are consulted, and we can confidently predict for the 'Musical Cabinet' a great success." — Sunday Timet, Sept. 30th.

MISS SELINA PYRE (Pupil of Mr. Charles Salaman) begs to announce that she has RETURNED to TOWN, and has resumed giving LESSONS on the PIANOFORTE. Miss P. attends Schools and her Pupils westward twice a-week—52 Great Prescott Street, E.

ORGANS.—A Large Stock of Church Organs, varying from Two to Twenty Stops, for SALE at reduced prices, and on very liberal Terms, in consequence of dissolution of partnership. A detailed List on application. & Fincham, Brook Street, Euston Road, London.

MUSICAL DIRECTORY, REGISTER, AND ALMANACK FOR 1861 will be issued early in December, Price Is. Gd.; per post, Is. 8d. Ad»ertisements, Lists of Music, Names and Addresses of Professors and the Trade must be sent in before the Hth NoTembcr, to Kudall, Rose, Carte, & Co., 20 Charing Cross.

B. ALLEN'S New FANTASIA on « OBERON,"

. composed expressly for and -dedicated to Miss Arabella Goddabd, is now published, price 6s. by Duncan DaTison and Co. 844 Regent Street, W.

THE SON of a PROFESSOR of MUSIC seeks employ- TIT ment, as a well-grounded knowledge of music. A small salary only expected J.TJ. to commence with.—Address A. Z., 13 Salmon Farade, Bridgewater, Somersetshire. E. Hai

rUSIC TRADE.—Wanted, an ASSISTANT for the

Country, one who can also Tune a Ptannforte tolerably—Apply by letter 'o

Harrison, Regent House, Clifton, Bristol .,

Holies Street, 6th October, 1860.

B00SEY AM) SONS' NEW PUBLICATIONS.

CHEAP EDITION OF BEETHOVEN'S SONATAS.

On the 20th October will be Published, in two very handsome Volumes, bound in cloth, gilt edges (490 pages), price 10a. 6<L each,

BEETHOVEN'S SONATAS

FOR THE PIANOFORTE. Edited by W. Dorrell, with Life of Beethoven by G. A. Macfarren, and Portrait by J. Ltnch. This Edition will be found the most perfect and correct of any that has appeared in England. It will be beautifully printed on excellent paper

from newly engraved plates.

NEW ARRANGEMENT OF SCHUBERT'S SONGS.
In the press, a New Arrangement of the most favourite of

SCHUBERT'S SONGS,

As brilliant and effective Pieces for the Pianoforte, by W. Kche.

CHEAP EDITION OF VERDI'S GREATEST WORK, "IL TROVATORE," IN MONTHLY PARTS. Just Published, PART I, price Is., of a complete Edition of VERDI'S celebrated Opera,

IL TROVATORE,

With English and Italian Words, beautifully printed on excellent paper, uniform with the Cheap Edition of "DLNORAH"
IL TROVATORE will be completed in EIGHT MONTHLY PARTS, Is. each.
SUBSCRIBERS' NAMES RECEIVED BY ALL MUSICSELLERS AND THE PUBLISHERS.

NEW MUSIC FOR CORNET AND PIANO.

THE CORNET MISCELLANY,

Arranged by Thomas Harper.

Extra Numbers just Published:
FANTASIE ON ENGLISH AIRS. I PANTASIE ON IRISH AmS.

FANTASIE ON SCOTCH AIRS. | FANTASIE ON AMERICAN AIRS.

Twenty-eight Numbers are already Published. (3s. each.)
NEW MUSIC FOR VIOLIN AND PIANO.

THE VIOLIN MISCELLANY,

Arranged by W. Watson.

No. 1.—DINORAH 3s. I No. 3 —SCOTCH AIRS

No. 2.—IRISH AIRS St. I No. 4.—ENGLISH AIRS

*»* The above ivill be published next weeh.

NEW MUSIC FOR FLUTE AND PIANO.

THE FLUTE MISCELLANY,

Arranged by R. S. Pratten.

1. MAZURKA BRILL ANTE.

2. POLKA DE CONCERT.

3. GRANDE VALSE BRILLANTE.

4. FANTASIE DINORAH.

5. FANTASIE IRISH AIRS.

6. FANTASLE SCOTCH AIRS.

7. FANTASIE ENGLISH AIRS

8. FANTASIE AMERICAN AIRS.

NEW PIANOFORTE DUETS,

Just Published, price 5s. each, Brilliant PIANOFORTE DUETS, by A. Sculoesser,
OBERON (published this day)—LA TRAVIATA— MARTHA—DINORAH.

NEW ENGLISH VOCAL DUETS.—MUSICAL EVENINGS.

A series of Popular Duets, translated by George Linley.

1. SWEET IS THE DREAM.—Campana. 1 4. PEACE TO THY SPIRIT.—Verdi.

2. TENDER BLOSSOMS.—Bellini. 5. O'ER THE BLUE WAVE.—Panofxa.

3. WE LOVE THEE SWEET NIGHT.—Bellini. | 6. THE BRIDESMAID'S DUET.—Donizetti.

LAURENT'S NEW WALTZES.

Just Published, by Henry Laurent,

MARGARETTA WALTZ, on Balfe's popular Song, illustrated by Beandard. KTLLARNEY WALTZ, on Irish Airs. LOCH KATRINE WALTZ, on Scotch Airs. SANTA LUCIA WALTZ, the celebrated Neapolitan Canzonet.

. Printed by daoaoa Axdhsw Spottiiwoodi, of No. 10 Little New gtrect. In the Periih of St. Bride. In the City of London, at No. S New-etreet Square, In the wid Pariah. PubUehcd by Joan Boomt, at the Office of Boo ear k Bon, S8 HoUei Street.- Saturday, October*, 1800.

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"the Worth Op Art Appears Most Eminent In Mosio, Since It Requires Ho Material, No Subject-matter, Whose Effect Must Be Deducted: It Is Wholly Fork And Power, And It Raises And Ennobles Whatever It Expresses"Gsthe

SUBSCRIPTION—Stamped for Postage—20s. FEB ANNUM Payable in advance by Cash or Post-Office Order to B00SEY & SONS, 28 Holies Street, Cavendish Square, London, W.

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The following Pieces are published separately:
ACT L

BALLAD—" The hunters wake with the early morn," Alice with Churns ...
DUET—"When lorn are parted," .Marian and Robin (publiihcd in A flit

and in F) ;each

SONG—" A dark and troublous time ii this." {Sheriff') ■ ...

BALLAD—" True love," {Marian (in B Sat or in G) |

BONG—" The monk within his cell," (Somtmour ... ... ... ...

BONG—" Englishmen by birth are free," Lockslty, with Chorus (In G) ;...

Ditto (without Chorus, in E 0at)

ROUND—" May the saints protect and guide thee,"

Altec, Allan, Sheriff, and Sotnpnour ... ... ... ... ...

ACT II.

FOUR-PART SONO—" The wood, the gay greenwood," . Chorus of Men (separate rolce parts, 'A. each) ... ... ... ... ... ...

TRIO—" A good fat deer makes lusty cheer," Robin, Much, and Little John

SONG—" Confusion to the Norman, Robin Hood with Chorus (in E flat) ...
Ditto (without Chorus, in B Oat)

SCENA—*1 Hail! happy morn." and M Power benign," Marian ...

AIR—" Power benign," (printed separately from the above, in F, and with a second stanza) ... ... ... * ...' '•* . ■*•

DUET—" To the Fair, to the Fair," Marian and Alia (in C or In B flat) ...

BALLAD—"From childhood's dawn," Sheriff (In A flat or in G) ...

BALLAD—" My own, my guiding star," Robin (in D flat, in B flat, or in G)

QUINTET—" My heart from its terror repose.," ,
Marian, Alice, Locksley, Allan, and Sheriff

ACT ILL

DUET—" Ceatest plague on earth if lore," Alice and Allan

cr-PMA f" Mv CftUd has fled»" *nd I tike—aw

BALLAD—" She hai left me to mourn" (printed separately from the above, In

G, and with a tecond itanxa)

DUET—** To King ltichard at once you must go/' Sheriff"lr"! Sompnour ...
FOUR-PART SONG-*'Now the mn hai mounted high," Chorus of Men

(separate voice parts, 6d. each) M ..

Ditto, arranged at a Trio fur two Trebles and a Basi

BONG—" Sons of the Greenwood." Marian with Chorus (in E, or without

Chorus in D)

. f" Vain was the proud ambition," and > B.u_ SCENA- Life tQ me b no longer deaf * Rohm

BALLAD—*4 Life to me is no longer dear " (printed separately from the above,

'in D, and with a second stauxa) „

TRIO—" By all the love that you have shown," Marian, Robin, and Sheriff ...

PIANO-FORTE ARRANGEMENTS.

The Overture, arranged by E. P. RimbauU _ ... 3 G

Ditto, as a Duet

Tbi Favourite Airs, in 3 Books, W. H. Calleot

Ditto, as Duets, in A Books, it'. H. Calicut

Quadrilles Charles Coote

Drtvos (Polydore)—Fantaiiie-Transcription on " Power benign"

Favabgsr (Ren*)—Fantasia on Favourite Airs

— "Mv own, my guiding star"

Hichahds (Brinley)—.*' From Childhood's dawn" ... ...

Grand Fantasia

Macparrrn (Walter) " True love"

"Life to me is no longer dear," and " Courage fires me" ...

Beisiac (Jules)— Fantalsie de Salon on " My own, my guiding star"

RilfBAULT (E. F.)—Six Favourite Airs.arranged (easy).—No. 1. "True love." 2. M My own, my guiding star." 3. " From childhood's dawn." 4. m Life to dear. 5. "Confusion to the Norman." 6. "Sons of the

each 1

The Author {in the Press)

each

, each

ARRANGEMENTS IN PREPARATION.

ICBAMER, BEALE, AND CHAPPELL, 801, REGENT STREET."

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UNDER TUB DISTINGUISHED PATRONAGE OP

HER MOST GRACIOU3 MAJESTY THE QUEEN, Il.R.H. THE PRINCE CONSORT, 1 H.R.H. THE PRINCE OF WALES, THE PRINCES AND PRINCESSES OF THE KOYAL FAMILY,

AND MANY OF THE

Nobility, Clergy, Gentry, and Distinguished Families of the Empire. .

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who are preparing for the i to the public by pyfbrm

Dr. Mark begs to Inform young ladies and gentl

rtrofosiion that ha affords opportunities of introducing rig at hli concert*.

Orphans of the musical profession, and poor children possessing n admitted free, and receive a general and musical education, together with board, I ing, and clothing, until the age of fourteen years, when they are either apprent! trade or trained for the profession. /

Little Buys, from five to nine years of nge, apprenticed for threejve, ofVfci years by paying a moderate entrance fee to cover the expenses of Tq>i books..

For Prospectuses, apply direct to the Royal College of Music, M/flcbjs Visitors are admitted from Nine to Eleven, a.m., and Two to Fuur^.nT Saturdays and Sundays excepted.

TUST PUBLISHED, RUDIMENTS of

fj with Progressive Exercises. By G. A. Macearren. Price Belle, *i Chappell, 201 Regent Street.

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Macfarren, G. A. Three Four-part Songs, for two Tenors and two Basses.

No. 1—" The fairy's evensong," G. Macfarrcn 2/0

2— '* The world's festivals," Douglas Thompson 3/0

3—" The arrow and the song," Longfellow 2/0

Separate vocal part each, . 0/6

Meyerbeer, G. " The Lord's Prayer," for four voices, (in score)

Soprano, Alto, Tenor, and Bass, and Organ, ad lib. 3/0 Separate vocal parts, each . . 0/6 „ '' Aspiration," for Bass solo, and chorus of three

Sopranos, two Tenors, and Bass, (in score) 4/0

Meyerbeer, G. " This house to love is holy," for eight voices, (in
score) two Sopranos, two Altos, two Tenors,
and two Basses .... I/O
Separate vocal parts, each . . 0/1
Monk, E. G. "The Battle of the Baltic," for four voices, (in score)

two Sopranos, Alto, Tenor, and Bass, Campbell 2/0
Separate vocal parts, each . . 0/6

Pecb, Dr. J. "The bridal morn," for four voices, (in score)

Soprano, Alto, Tenor, and Bass . . *}• Vos, C. De. "God save the Queen," for four voices, (wo

Tenors, and two Basses) in score . • W

Loroon: DUNCAN DAVISON & CO., Dep6t General de la Maison Brandus, de Paris j 244 Regent Street, corner of Little Argyll Street

[MUSIC AND THEATRES IN PARIS.

{From our own Correspondent.')

[Parii, Oct 4.

Nbws of all sorts is scant this week. The most prominent item is the assurance, which is very commonly promulgated and believed in, that Meyerbeer's long-talked-of Africaine is at last about to be drawn from her long captivity in the escritoire of her illustrious progenitor and proprietor. She is to be made over, after the horrors of that middle passage, a rehearsal, to be a possession of the world at large, or rather, she is to be emancipated and become a free citizeness of every civilised community, on the stage of the Imperial Opera in Paris. The name under which this opera has been so long talked of is not, however, to be retained. Meyerbeer invariably rebaptises his productions on giving them to the world. It is to be entitled, say the gossips, Vasco di Gama. The motive which has led the composer to consent at last to the production of his work, the composition of which is said to have preceded that of Le Prophete, is, that in the existing company, under the direction of M. Alphonse Rover, for the first time has presented itself that combination of talents and attributes, which the master judges necessary to give entire fulfilment to his intentions. The simultaneous engagement of Mad. Tedesco and of M. Niemann, the tenor, has brought about this tardy determination. M. Alphonse Rover has engaged M. Morelli, the baritone, who is to play Wolfram in Taunhaiiser; but he is to sing in Ouillaume Tell first, in which, it is said, he appears to great advantage.

The rehearsals of the Pardon de Ploermel have commenced at the Opera Comique. It is said that the air which Meyerbeer composed for the second act, and which Mad. Nantier Didice sang when Dinorah was produced at Covent Garden, will be introduced on its revival here. Mile. Darcier is to be entrusted with it. This young lady u the niece of the actress Mile. Darcier, now retired from the stage, and become Mad. Mamiguard. Before appearing in Le Pardon she will make her debut in Le Pre aux Clercs. I mentioned to you last week a disagreement which had taken place between M. Ernest Reger, the composer of Maitre Wolfram, and the manager of the Theatre Lyrique, who, finding himself trammelled with the previous engagement of his predecessor to produce a new opera by this composer at the opening of the season, had first got the day of production postponed by consent, and then sought to free himself from all definite terms on the subject. An action was threatened, which would most certainly have issued in an award of damages to the injured authors of the work. A better result has been obtained, however, by amicable negotiations. The opera, which is entitled Let Ruines de Baalbec,Yi\\\ be shortly produced without the intervention of any legal process whatever. 1\xe'_Bouffes Parisiennes is in a vein of wondrous good fortune. The twenty first performances of Orphee aux Enfers, revived this season, have brought in a clear receipt of 40,060 fr. (1,600/.), or about 80/. per night.

The Italian Opera opened on Tuesday night with La Sonnambuln. Mile. Mane Battu and MM. Gardoni and Angelini were the principal artists. Next week I will tell you at length about the doings at this establishment.

At the theatres, at least those of the higher class, there has been nothing new, except a little comedy in one act, called Une Tasse de The, produced at the Vaudeville by MM. Mitter and Derby. I have not seen it yet, but it is said to abound in comic situations, and to be very well acted by St. Germain and Mile. Marquet.

At the Varietes a new drama, in three acts, is shortly forthcoming. Meanwhile La Fille du Diable has been revived. A thorough-bred melodrama of the fine old stock has sprung up at the Anibigu. It is entitled La Maison du Pont Noire Dame, and is divided into five acts and six tableaux. The authors are MM. Theodore Barriere and H. de Kock.

It appears that the intelligence I communicated not long since to your readers of Mr. Lumley having taken the Theatre du Cirqus in Brussels for a series of operatic performances by Italian artiste is without foundation. The ex-manager disposes of the destinies of many artists whose professional horoscopes are studded with laurel crowns and sheaves of banque notes, and he is besieged, it would seem, with applications from all quarters to transfer his

interest in them, but that he is prepared to incur the risks of management does not appear. By the way, an anecdote which has gone the round of the papers concerning some enthusiastic demonstration elicited by Jenny Lind at Stockholm, reminds one of the skilful manipulation with which Mr. Lumley was wont to work up and lash into fury the popular curiosity about this retired divinity. The students of the Swedish capital, in their eagerness to shower down their good wishes on the departing nightingale, upset a boat into which a party of them had got. Soused over ears, the ardour of their admiration was nevertheless unquenched, and, clinging to the upturned keel, they still gurgled forth their farewell chorus amidst the regurgitated liquid they had involuntarily swallowed. What a puff would this have been for the sails of the impresario when Jenny sailed among his crewl What a tempest of second-hand enthusiasm would Prospero have conjured out of it with the firmly-grasped wand of the free and independent British press! Alas 1 all is over now. Miranda is married to Ferdinand, Caliban is dead in a distant land; Ariel has bartered her new-given liberty to a magician of inferior glamour; and Prospero has buried his wand and books five fathoms deep under the Lord Chancellor's woolsack, and wanders on the continent under the conventional and colourless guise of rentier. As for the " oft-vext Bermoothes," if Trinculo and Stephano are not masters over it, yet merry doings and high jinks are there, and as usual the "air is filled with sweet sounds that give delight and hurt not," so far as the public are concerned.

Oct. 10.

The long-promised revival of Le'Prophete at the Grand Opera is again put off, and with it the reappearance of Mad. Tedesco. The cause of this fresh procrastination is the illness of Mile. Hamakers. Last Saturday the The&tre Lyrique gave a representation extraordinaire, or, as we should say, a benefit in favour of the funds of the Association des Artistes et Musiciens. The performances consisted of the opera Les Rosiires, a comedy from the Gymnase, entitled Une Partee de Piquet, and a musical interlude contributed by the military band under the direction of M. Mohr. The rehearsals of the Vol (TAndorre are nearly brought to a close, and the opera will be produced this week. M. Retz, the manager, has just engaged a pupil of the Conservatoire, Mile. Baretti, for three years.

There is still but little doing at the theatres. At the Odeon a new comedy has been produced from the pen of M. Galoppc d'Ouquaire, entitled Les Vertueux de Province. The author has aimed at conveying a moral, but avoided being dull in so doing, a feat not always accomplished by modern playwrights when making the same attempt. Dalila has been revived at the Vaudeville, and at the Varietes a new piece, entitled Ce qui plait aux Hommes is announced, in which Miles. Lejars and Marie Gamier are to make their first appearance. The Palais Royal has put forth two new one-act pieces, La Famille de VHorloger and Un gros Mot. The latter by MM. Labriche and Dumoustier, has turned out the most successful of the two, and Ravel is fitted in it with a character in which his original and fantastic humour finds full scope.

The series of Rossini's musical evenings at home at his villa in Passy has been brought to a close, the venerable bard and his lady having returned to their winter quarters in the Chaussee d'Antin. The baritone, Signor Delia Siede, who sang with so much success in Rossini's and Mad. Orpila's salons, has returned to Berlin, where he is engaged for the Italian Opera there during the ensuing season. It is said that he is to return to Paris in March next, when he will appear in public.

Thalberg is at present in Paris. He is going to London, and thence to Germany, to look after family affairs. Another virtuoso of celebrity, M. Vieuxtemps, is reported to have bid adieu to the wandering life of an artist, and in proof of this it is alleged that he has purchased a house at Frankfort. The German papers announce the death of M. Horzalka, a pianist and composer. Among his best works are mentioned a song called The Miller and his Child, the words of which were by Ranpach, and another, The Waces of the Sea, by Grillpazer. He was sixty-two.

The approaching marriage of Mile. Virginie Ferni, the female violinist, is spoken of, to a merchant of Nice, to whom she has been affianced since her tenth year. She will thereupon retire into private life.

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