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-about the fame in rear of the building, falls Rear ? off abruptly on those two quarters.

abruptly? 3. On the north end, it subsides gradually into extensive pasture ginund; while, on the subsides south, it Nopes more steeply, in shorter dif tance and terminates with the coach house, termixetes? ftables, vineyard, and nurseries.

4. On either wing, is a thick grove of parallel? different flowering forest trees. Parallel with them, on the land fide, are two spacious gardens, into which, one is led by two fer- Serpentine ? pentine gravel walks, planted with weeping willows.

5. The manfion house appears venerable and manfion ? convenient.— A lofty Portico, ninety fix feet in length supported by eight pillars, has a portico ? pleasing effect, when viewed from the water,

6. A small park on the margin of the river, park where the English fallow deer, and the A- margin? merican wild deer, are seen through hickets, romantic ? alternately with the vessels as they are fail picturesque ? ing, add a romantic and pi&turefque appearance to the whole scenery.

7. On the oppofite side of a small creek breek ? to the northward, an extensive plain, exhibiting cornfields and cat:le grazing, affords in grazing ? summer, a luxurious landscape to the eye, while the blended verdure of woodlands, blended ? and cultivated declivities on the Maryland declivities ? fhore, variegates the prospect in a charming variegates ? mamer.

8. Such are the philofophic shades, to tumultuous? which our beloved and lamented Command. er, retired from the tumultuous scenes of a busy world.

The Gentleman and the Basket-Maker.
HERE was in a distant part of the

,
a rich

who lived in a
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fine

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Whole. fine house, and spent his whole time in eat.

ing, drinking, sleeping, and amusing himself. infolent? 2. As he had a great many servants to

wait upon him, who treated him with the

greatest respect, and did whatever they were capricious ? ordered, and as he had never been taught the truth, or accustomed to hear it, he

grew very proud, infolent, and capricious ; imagining that he had a right to command all the world, and that the poor were only born to

serve and obey him. deeds!

3. Near this rich man's house, there lived an honest and industrious poor man, who

gained his livelihood by making little bas cottage ?

kets out of dried reeds, which grew upon a
piece of marshy ground close to his cottage.

4. But though he was obliged to labour
from morning to night, to carn food enough
to support him, and though he seldom fared
better than upon dry bread or rice, or pulse,
and had no other bed than the remains of the
rushes of which he made

baskets, yet appetite.

was he always happy,cheerful,and contented;
for his labour gave him so good an appetite

that the coarselt fare appeared to him delicious, delicious ? and he went to bed so tired, that he would

have slept foundly even upon the ground. humane ? 5. Besides this, he was a good and virtu

ous man, humane to every body, honelt in honeft. his dealings, always accustomed to speak the

truth ; and therefore beloved and respected neighbours. by all his neighbours.

6. The rich man, on the contrary, though nicejl. he lay upon the softest bed, yet could not sleep,

because he had passed the day in idleness ; and wait. tho the nicest dilhes were prefented to him, yet could he not eat with

any

pleasure, because appetite.

he did not wait till nature gave him an appe

tite, nor use exercise,nor go into the open air. Auggard? 7. Besides this, as he was a great fluggard

and

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pulse ?

Whole. fine house, and spent his whole time in eato

ing, drinking, sleeping, and amusing himself. infolent ? 2. As he had a great many servants to

wait upon him, who treated him with the

greatest respect, and did whatever they were capricious ? ordered, and as he had never been taught

the truth, or accustomed to hear it, he grew very proud, insolent, and capricious ; imagining that he had a right to command all the world, and that the poor were only born to

serve and obey him. feeds ?

3. Near this rich man's house, there lived an honest and industrious poor man, who

gained his livelihood by making little bascotiage ?

kets out of dried reeds, which grew upon a piece of marshy ground close to his cottage.

4. But though he was obliged to labour from morning to night, to earn food enough to support him, and though he feldom fared better than upon dry bread or rice, or pulse, and had no other bed than the remains of the

rushes of which he made baskets, yet appetite. was he always happy,cheerful,and contented;

for his labour gave him so good an appetite

that the eoarfelt fare appeared to him delicious, delicious ? and he went to bed so tired, that he would

have flept foundly even upon the ground. humane? 5. Besides this, he was a good and virtu

ous man, humane to every body, honest in honest. his dealings, always accustomed to speak the

truth ; and therefore beloved and respected neighbours. by all his neighbours.

6. The rich man, on the contrary, though niceft. he lay upon the softest bed, yet could not sleep,

because he had pafled the day in idleness; and wait. tho the nicest dishes were prefented to him,

yet could he not eat with any pleasure, because appetite.

he did not wait till nature gave him an appe

tite, nor use exercise,nor go into the open air. Auggard? 7. Besides this, as he was a great sluggard

and

1

and glutton, he was almost always ill; and, Gutton ? as he did good to nobody, he had no friends, and even his servants spoke ill of him behind nobody. his back, and all his neighbours, whom he oppressed, hated him.

8. For these reasons, he was fullen, melan- cheerful. choly, and unhappy, and became difplealed with all who appeared more cheerful tha himself. When he was carried out in his borne. palanquin, a kind of bed borne upon the îhoulders of men, he frequently passed by the cottage of the poor basket-maker, who was always fitting at the door, and singing as he wove the baskets.

9. The rich man could not behold this wretok. without anger-_What, said he, fhall a wretch, a peasair, a low-born fellow that weaves bulrushes for a scanty subsistence, be peasant ? always happy and pleafed, while I, that am a gentleman, poffefled of riches and power, and of more consequence than a million of reptiles ? reptiles like him, am always melancholy and discontented ?

10. This reflection arose so often in his conquor. mind, that at last he began to feel the greatest degree of hatred towards the poor man; and, as he had never been accustomed to conquer his own pallions, however improper happier. or unjust they might be, he at last determin. ed to punish the basket-maker for being happier than hiniselt.

11. With this wicked design he one night disobey. gave orders to his servants, who did not dare to disobey him, to set fire to the rushes which surrounded? furrounded the poor man's house.

12. As it was summer, and the weather in weather. that country is extremely hot, the fire foon fpread over the whole marsh, and not only consumed all the rushes, but foon extended to extremely. the cottage itself, and the poor man was ob

liged

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