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three hundred and ten so dedicated in England ; but in later times it has become still more general, on an average one in every five of our modern Churches being so named. The third Person in the Blessed Trinity is very rarely honoured separately; we have but two instances in England: Marland, Devon; and the Chapel of the Holy Ghost, Basingstoke, Hants, unless S. Esprit, in Warwickshire, be thus intended. Under the name of S. Saviour's and Christ Church we have sixty-six dedications to the second Person, but of these great part are comparatively modern, from the constant use in our own day of the dedication of Christ Church, in cases of new district parish Churches. This is quite opposed to the medieval custom, when this dedication seems to have been applied almost exclusively to Cathedrals or Collegiate Churches. The term S. Saviour has its origin, like S. Sepulchre, from the French Le Saint Sauveur.

Representations of the mystical Three in One, as emblematical of the Holy Trinity, abounded from a very early age. We give three from the tombs of

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the early Christians in the catacombs of Rome, and

two examples of the monogram very commonly met with on brasses, painted glass, &c., in medieval times.

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In later representations, the Three Persons of the Holy Trinity are more distinctly defined, the Holy Ghost being most generally represented between the Father and the Son, either as a dove only, with the nimbus, or as a human form, with a dove perched upon His arm or head. A number of curious engravings of these subjects may be referred to in Didron's Iconographie Chretienne, and a selection from them in a review of that work in the first volume of the Archæological Journal. Some are particularly deserving of notice, as two from a MS. of the thirteenth century in the Bibliotheque Royale of Paris, representing the Trinity creating man. Those of the fifteenth century, shew a great and almost irreverential decline in symbolic character, representing the Father as a pope, and far advanced in years, the Son as a vigorous man, and the Holy Spirit between them as the youngest of the three.

PART II.

BRIEF ACCOUNTS OF THE SAINTS WHO HAVE CHURCHES

NAMED IN THEIR HONOUR, OR WHOSE IMAGES ARE MOST FREQUENTLY MET WITH, IN ENGLAND.

ABBREVIATIONS.

A. or Ab. Abbot or Abbess. Abp. Archbishop. B. Bishop. C. Confessor. D. Doctor of the Church. Emp. Emperor or Empress. H. Hermit. K. King. M. Martyr. P. Pope. Q. Queen. V. Virgin.

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BRIEF ACCOUNTS OF THE SAINTS, WHOSE IMAGES ARE

MOST FREQUENTLY MET WITH, OR WHO HAVE CHURCHES NAMED IN THEIR HONOUR, IN ENGLAND.

S. Acca, B., A.D. 740. Was the disciple and friend of S. Wilfred, whom he succeeded in the bishopric of Hexham ; he was contemporary with the Venerable Bede, who assures usa, “ that he was a man most learned in the Scriptures, most pure in the confession of the Catholic faith, most skilful in the rules of ecclesiastical discipline, most strenuous and industrious in all good, and a doer of great things both before God and man.” He held his bishopric twenty-four years, and departed A.D. 740. He was commemorated on Dec. 20th; and the Church of Aycliffe, Durham, is dedicated in his honour. There is a painting on wood of this saint in the Abbey

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