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VISSCHER, MARIA TESSELSCHADE.
Holland, 1594-1649.

The Nightingale (Translation)
WALLER, EDMUND.
England, 1605 - 1687.

Girdle, On a

Go, lovely Rose !
WALLER, JOHN FRANCIS.
Ireland, b. 1810.

Spinning-Wheel Song, The
WALSH, WILLIAM.
England, 1663-1707.

Rivalry in Love
WALTON, IZAAK. (See JOHN CHALKHILL.)
England, 1593 - 1683.

Angler's Wish, The . WARTON, THOMAS. England, 1728-1790.

Retirement WASTELL, SIMON. England, d. 1623.

Man's Mortality WATSON, JAMES W. America.

Beautiful Snow
WATTS, ISAAC.
England, 1674-1749.

* Before Jehovah's awful throne
From all that dwell”
Insignificant Existence
"O God! our help in ages pasi”
Summer Evening, A.
"The heavens declare thy glory, Lord ! »
“There is a land of pure delight".

“Unveil thy bosom, faithful tomb "
WAUGH, EDWIN.
England.

The dule 's i' this bonnet o' mine
WEIR, HARRISON.
England.

English Robin, The
WELBY, AMELIA B.
America, b. 1821.

The Old Maid WESLEY, CHARLES. England, 1708 - 1788.

* And let this feeble body fail”
'Jesus, lover of my soul”
"Now to the haven of thy breast"
“On Jordan's stormy banks"

Wrestling Jacob
WESTWOOD, THOMAS.
England.

Little Bell.

“Under my window" WHITCHER, FRANCES MIRIAM. Whitesboro, N. Y., b. 1802.

Widow Bedott to Elder Sniffles
WHITE, PLANCO.
England, 1773-1840.

Night
WHITE, HENRY KIRKE.
England, 1785 - 1806.

Early Primrose, To the

Harvest Moon, To the . WHITTIER, JOHN GREENLEAF. Haverhill, Mass., b. 1807.

Absent Sailor, To her
Angel of Patience, The
Barbara Frietchie
Barclay of Ury
Barefoot Boy, The
Benedicite (Snow Bound)
Burns
Farewell

, The
Hampton Beach
Schabod
Indian Summer .
Laus Deo!

Maud Muller

Meeting, The 348

New England in Winter .
Palm-Tree, The

Poet's Reward, The . 50

Pumpkin, The 45

Reformer, The
WILDE, RICHARD HENRY.
Ireland, 1789-1847.

Life
WILLIS, NATHANIEL PARKER.

Portland, Me., 1807 - 1867. 59

Belfry Pigeon, The
Leper, The
Parrhasius.

Women, Two 520

WILSON, JOHN (K’it North).
Scotland, 1785 - 1854.

Evening Cloud, The. 325

To a Sleeping Child
WINSLOW, HARRIET.

Ainerica, b. 1824. 186

“Why thus longing ?” WITHER, GEORGE.

England, 1588 - 1567. 251

"I loved a lass, a fair one"
“Lord ! when those glorious lights I see"

Shepherd's Resolution, The.
284 WOLCOTT, DR. (Peter Pindar).
294 England, 17;3 - 1819.
593 King Canute and his Nobles
271

Pilgrims and the Peas, The . 314

Razor-Seller, The 282 WOLFE, CHARLES. 266

Ireland, 1719-1823.
175 Burial of Sir John Moore
WOODWORTH, SAMUEL
Scituate, Mass., 1785 - 1842.

Old Oaken Bucket, The
WORDSWORTH, WILLIAM.
England, 1770-1850.

Cuckoo, To ihe. 344

Daffodils
Daisy, To the

Education of Nature, The 620

England
Helvellyn

Highland Giri of Inverspaid, To ihe 285

Inner Vision, The

Intimations of Immortality 272 272

Lost Love, The 265

March 270

Music
Old Matthew
Pet Lamb, The

Rainbow, The 631

Reaper, The
“She was a phantom of delight”
Simon Lee, the old Huntsman
Skylark, To the
Sleeplessness.
Two April Mornings,

The
We are Seven
Westminster Bridge .
Worldliness
Yarrow Unvisited

Varrow Visited
WOTTON, SIR HENRY.
England, 1568-1639.

A Happy Live
“You meaner beauties”

Verses in Praise of Angling
153
179 WYATT, SIR THOMAS.
448 England. 1503-1542.
377

An Earnest Suit 26 The Deceived Lover sueth only for Liberty. 31

XAVIER, ST. FRANCIS. 703

France, 1506 - 1552. 142

“My God, I love thee" (Translation). 473 713 YOUL, EDWARD. 316

England.

Song of Spring

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342 369 367

21 442 2II

23 567 622 194 307 585 33

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ANONYMOUS.

Advice
Annie Laurie
Baby Louise (M. E.)
Bachelor's Hall
Burd Helen
Caliph and Satan, The
Cano Carmen Sixpence
Child of Elle, The
Children in the Wood, The .
Civil War.
Deborah Lee
D.eamer, The
Drummer-Boy's Burial, The
Eggs and the Horses, The
"Fairer than thee"
Fair Helen of Kirkconnell
Fetching Water from the Well
Forze, The Song of the
Gluggity Glug
"Go, feel what I have felt"
Good old Plough, The :
Go to thy rest, fair child
Grief for the Dead
Heaven
Homesick for the Country
Hundred Years to come, A
“If women could be fair”
Indian Chieftain, The
Indian Summer
Jovial Beggar, The

Just as I am"
" Juohony, git oot!”
King and the Miller of Mansfield, The
Kissing 's no Sin
Lady Ann Bothwell's Lament
Lament of the Border Widow
Little Puss
“Love me little, love me long"
Loveliness of Love, The

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“Love not me for comely grace

61 Meditation on the Frailty of this Life, A 611 Mummy at Belzoni's Exhibition, Auswer of the 543 My eyes ! how I love you

74 "My Love in her attire

47 My old Kentucky Home My sweet Sweeting

49 New Year's Eve Nothing but leaves"

269 Old-School Punishment

26 "Only waiting.”

266 Origin of the Opal

654 Orphans, The

246 Perils of the Pave, The

707 Prayer for Life, A

288 Remonstrance with the Snails

357 Robin Hood and Allen-a-Dale

496 Sally of the Cid

410 Sea Fight, The .

487 Sebastopol taken- in and done for (London

Diogenes) Shan Van Vocht

455 Shule Aroon Signs of Rain

313 Skater Belle, Our

518 Skeleton, Toa

622 Sneezing

763 Somebody

97 Stormy Petrel, Lines to the

354 Summer Days

80 Swell's Soliloquy

742 The Caliph and Satan (J. F. C.) The Eggs and the Horses (R. Ś. S.)

759 “The land, boys, we live in

444 The Petrified Fern

620 The Seaside Well.

596 “ They 're dear fish to me"

199 Tomb of Cyrus, The

210 Under the Cross (W. c. R.)'

178 Useful Plough, The

420 Vicar of Bray, The

754 Waly, waly, but love be bonny

173 "When shall we all meet again?" White Rose, The.

39 “Why, lovely charmer

47 Wife to her Husband, The

157 Willy drowned in Yarrow .

415
54

6
729
112
673
763
509

10 381 763 224 378 759

46 197

93 423 733 417 421 195 176 266 136 621 608 761 317 732 274 106 497

79 173

673

225

207

6 61 60

202

This is love, who, deaf to prayers,
Hoth writt befying mewares,
Draw, if then contite Purphe lie
Levering rightly his from there
thich is human, which divine.

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INTRODUCTION.

So large a collection of poems as this demands of its compiler an extensive familiarity with the poetic literature of our language, both of the early and the later time, and withal so liberal a taste as not to exclude any variety of poetic merit. At the request of the Publishers I undertook to write an Introduction to the present work, and in pursuance of this design I find that I have come into a somewhat closer personal relation with the book. In its progress it has passed entirely under my revision, and, although not absolutely responsible for the compilation or its arrangement, I have, as requested, exercised a free hand both in excluding and in adding matter according to my judgment of what was best adapted to the purposes of the enterprise. Such, however, is the wide range of English verse, and such the abundance of the materials, that a compilation of this kind must be like a bouquet gathered from the fields in June, when hundreds of flowers will be left in unvisited spots, as beautiful as those which have been taken. It may happen, therefore, that many who have learned to delight in some particular poem will turn these pages, as they might those of other collections, without finding their favorite. Nor should it be matter of surprise, considering the multitude of authors from whom the compilation is made, if it be found that some are overlooked, especially the more recent, of equal merit with many whose poems appear in these pages. It may happen, also, that the compiler, in consequence of some particular association, has been sensible of a beauty and a power of awakening emotions and recalling images in certain poems which other readers will fail to perceive. It should be considered, moreover, that in poetry, as in painting, different artists have different modes of presenting their conceptions, each of which may possess its peculiar merit, yet those whose taste is formed by contemplating the productions of one class take little pleasure in any other. Crabb Robinson relates that Wordsworth once admitted to him that he did not much admire contemporary poetry, not because of its want of poetic merit, but because he had been accustomed to poetry of a different sort, and added that but for this he might have read it with pleasure. I quote from memory. It is to be hoped that every reader of this collection, however he may have been trained, will find in the great variety of its contents something conformable to his taste. I suppose

it is not necessary to give a reason for adding another to the collections of this nature, already in print. They abound in every language, for the simple reason that there is a demand for them. German literature, prolific as it is in verse, has many of them, and some of them compiled by distinguished authors. The parlor table and the winter fireside require a book which, when one is in the humor for reading poetry and knows not what author to take up, will supply exactly what he wants.

I have known persons who frankly said that they took no pleasure in reading poetry, and perhaps the number of those who make this admission would be greater were it not for the fear of appearing singular. But to the great mass of mankind poetry is really a delight and a refreshment. To many, perhaps to most, it is not requisite that it should be of the highest degree of merit. Nor, although it be true that the poems which are most famous and most highly prized are works of considerable length, can it be said that the pleasure they give is in any degree proportionate to the extent of their plan. It seems to me that it is only poems of a moderate length, or else portions of the greater works to which I refer, that produce the effect upon the mind and heart which make the charm of this kind of writing. The proper office of poetry, in filling the mind with delightful images and awakening the gentler emotions, is not accomplished on a first and rapid perusal, but requires that the words should be dwelt upon until they become in a certain sense our own, and are adopted as the utterance of our own minds. A collection such as this is intended to be furnishes for this purpose portions of the best English verse suited to any of the varying moods of its readers.

Such a work also, if sufficiently extensive, gives the reader an opportunity of comparing the poetic literature of one period with that of another; of noting the fluctuations of taste, and how the poetic forms which are in fashion during one age are laid aside in the next; of observing the changes which take place in our language, and the sentiments which at different periods challenge the public approbation. Specimens of the poetry of different centuries presented in this way show how the great stream of human thought in its poetic form eddies now to the right and now to the left, wearing away its banks first on one side and then on the other. Some author of more than common faculties and more than common boldness catches the public attention, and immediately he has a crowd of followers who form their taste on his and seek to divide with him the praise. Thus Cowley, with his undeniable genius, was the head of a numerous class who made poetry consist in far-fetched conceits, ideas oddly brought together, and quaint turns of thought. Pope, following close upon Dryden, and learning much from him, was the founder of a school of longer duration, which found its models in Boileau and other poets of the reign of Louis the Fourteenth,-a school in which the wit predominated over the poetry,-a school marked by striking oppositions of thought, frequent happinesses of expression, and a carefully balanced modulation, - numbers pleasing at first, but in the end fatiguing. As this school degenerated the wit almost disappeared, but there was no new infusion of poetry in its place. When Scott gave the public the Lay of the Last Minstrel, and other poems, which certainly, considered as mere narratives, are the best we have, carrying the reader forward without weariness and with an interest which the author never allows to subside, a crowd of imitators pressed after him, the greater part of whom are no longer read. Wordsworth had, and still has, his school ; the stamp of his example is visible on the writings of all the poets of the present day.

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