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down the ladder whose top he has seized, forth their deadly contents, and it is as if 5.

as every one observing him from above over the whole length of the ramp had or below fully expects him to do, but been passed the sharp sickle of death. jumping on to it he goes scurrying down it The rushing sepoys go down before it as as fast as he can, and his companions im- the standing corn goes down before the mediately follow his example — they have sweep of the scythe. And men rush no desire to remain where they are, or to across the enclosure, even up towards the fight their fellow-countrymen. And now guns, and wave their arms, and fall to the amid great shouts of praise and cries of ground, and lie there writhing in their welcome from those below, the men of agony. War is not a pretty thing. And both Fane's bands begin to swarm down the Englishmen ply the men on the wall both the ladders, and the men he has with their muskets, and cause them to run stationed at the gateway seeing what is back. The pieces having been reloaded, happening, rush away from their post and the Englishmen have again nothing to join those at the nearest ladder, and the do but wait. And a good many of the English men cannot control or coerce those minutes so unexpectedly fraught with such who so largely outnumber them, and they momentous consequences go by, and their have to throw themselves together to pre- opponents have not appeared again. vent themselves from being overpowered Now the cause of this is seen. They singly in case their men, instead of merely have been making a circuit behind them. deserting them, should become actively A party of sepoys now appears on the hostile, to which the sepoys from below banquette of the wall on the other side of are now loudly urging them. There is a the enclosure, the outer, or river, or city short period of great confusion and dis- wall, while another party appears again on order, and then there is nothing for the the inner wall at the top of the fatal ramp. Englishmen to do but to get back to the And both these parties fire down on the guns in the enclosure and there fight out Englishmen and the Englishmen return the final fight.

the fire, not only with their muskets, but They could of course have run down to with the howitzer, which is brought to the Water Gate and passed out through it bear with such effect on the men on the on to the river and so got safely out of the outer wall as to scatter them. And then place long before the sepoys had mounted it is loaded again — the natives themselves the wall in any numbers. But the thought attribute our success in the battles against of this occurs to none of them; could not them greatly to our quickness in the loadhave been entertained if it had. Why, ing and firing of our guns - and brought there are eight of them — enough to fight, to bear on the party on the inner wall, and too many to run away. And Fane and scatters it too. And then again two Frost and Smith, commissioned officers, bodies of sepoys appear simultaneously and Hurley and Scully and Doolan and on the two opposite walls, as if to distract Flannagan, and Reilly (now lying dead on the attention and divide the fire of the the wall above) and Cooper; these were Englishmen, and as the howitzer sends its they who fought the great fight this day. deadly hail across the top of the inner

Fane tells off the men to the guns. wall, the men on the oppos wall rush on And Michael Flannagan has taken his and begin to descend the slope leading stand by the train, the setting fire to which down from that wall to the enclosure, is to be the last blow on their side in the which said slope or ramp is open and fight.

free, and not encumbered with dead and * When I lift my hat,” says Fane. wounded as the one on the opposite side

It will take the sepoys some little time is. But two pieces had been trained on to mount the walls and make their way this ramp, and they have been standing towards them, and that time is utilized in ready loaded for a long time, and now they loading muskets, and laying them down are discharged, and though the men do by the side of the guns for the use of not go down in a shock as they had be. those who are to cover the men appointed fore, a good many of them fall, and the to fire and load the latter. And so the rest go back. But now the Jemadar Rusmoments go by, their fierce heat upfelt. tum Khan himself: appears upon this And now the sepoys come shouting along wall, and quietly makes observation of the top of the inner wall, and now they the placing of the guns below, while the come pouring down the ramp to their easy Englishmen take shots at him. victory, only eight men before them; and What his orders are is soon seen. RusFane watches them quietly, and then gives tum Khan does not mean to let them the word of command, and two guns send I bring their superior engines of destruction,

which have so greatly multiplied their a long length of the arsenal wall blown numbers, into play against him in the over. If the smaller fragments of the same wholesale way. He directs his men closely cemented brick and mortar were to scatter themselves along the banquette, carried to long distances the bullets were and lying down upon it to take steady, carried still farther. Writing with referseparate aim at the Englishmen. There ence to this, a native eye-witness and are now only six of them. Frost, the chronicler of the events of the day, says: young officer who had been so troubled at “It” (the explosion of the magazine) “ did the news of the mutineers having got into great damage to the adjacent houses, and the town, had been killed by a shot through killed about five hundred passengers walkthe head, and Sergeant Hurley was killed ing in different streets. The bullets fell on the occasion of the second rush. And in the houses of people to such a degree of these six there is not a man, except that some children picked up two pounds, Fane himself and Flannagan, who was and some five pounds of it, from the yards sheltered by the powder magazine, who is of their houses.” However that may be, not more or less badly wounded.

inany thousands of bullets were hurled But still they continue to play on the into the air, for the magazine was very full wall with their howitzer and their muskets. of ball ammunition. The explosion of the And so the fight goes on. And the heat powder magazine, with its massive side of the sun, of the air, is terrible, for it walls half buried in the earth, and its masnow about three o'clock in the afternoon, sive circular roof, was also like the burstthe hottest time of the day. And now asing of a huge shell

. A huge black cavern Scully and Doolan, the two Irishmen who now marked the place where it had stood. have done such splendid service in the The assailants suffered severely. Many loading and firing of the guns, both being were killed by the direct shock and contall, strong, powerful men, are standing by cussion of the explosion, many by the the muzzle of the howitzer, and about to rockets and bullets and fragments of ma. reload, the bullets take them, and the sonry flying about. Many were destroyed sponging rod drops from the hand of the by the heavier masses of masonry in their one, and the powder bag from the hand of descent; many who were gathered together the other, and one falls to the ground and on the top of it, or at its base, were killed the other reels back, and there is a shout by the blowing down of the long length of from the walls; and then, as if they had battlement near the magazine. risen out of the earth, at the edge where The survivors on the spot were conthe level road across the enclosure and scious only of the sudden obscuring of the the steep incline leading down to the gate. sun, and of the dark shadow which the way meet, appears a line of red coats and huge, depse cloud of smoke cast over dark faces - they had come in through them. Those who were observing the the gateway which Rustum Khan had had place of conflict from a distance saw a opened - and then along the level road great pyramid of flame leap suddenly high way comes a swift rush for the guns. into the air, were stunned by the shock of

The time has come. Fane quietly lifts the explosion, and then saw that a tall, his hat. The earth trembles, and the tall black column of smoke had taken the place walls rock. The air is rent with the sound of the flame - saw that this black shaft of the great explosion. It closely resem- remained solid for some time, and then bles a volcanic eruption. There is the gradually widened out at the top until it uprushing column of flame and smoke; looked like a gigantic mushroom. the air is filled with the white dust of the mortar of the shattered building, to represent the volcanic ashes; and the fragments of masonry hurled into the air

From Beigravia. represent the cast-up rocks, to which they

OUR WITTIEST JUDGE. are not unequal in size. The larger of these fragments descend close around; some of the smaller are carried to enormous dis. tances. The first terrible noise of the The list of English wits is a large and explosion is succeeded by the sharp hiss. respectable one, and varied enough in its ing of rockets and pioging of bullets rush. departments. It would be interesting to ing through the air; by the dull thud of the classify the principles that have directed descending fragments of masonry striking each form of humor, or trace out to what the earth ; by the crash of falling build- extent it has been prompted by the particings. The office building is blown down ; l ular situation or the character of the pro

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THE LATE SIR W. MAULE.

BY PERCY FITZGERALD.

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fessor. It might be discovered that a Born in 1788 at Edmonton, he was sent to good deal was owing to the fashion of Cambridge, where he distinguished him

looking at things,” to what, in short, self in mathematical studies to an extraoraccounts for the “style” of different dinary degree, and, it is said, that he painters. Thus an impressionist” can would have been one of the first of Euroonly see the moods and tones of nature, pean mathematicians had he not followed and is blind to details ; a Deaner or a the bar. When he graduated in 1810, he Hemling seems to paint as though his eyes“ came out” senior wrangler, and so far were but an inch away from the subject. ahead of bis competitors, that no There are humorists who detect fantastic could be considered second a sort of images, and similarities, like Sydney eclipse" first, the rest nowhere. He in. Smith; others, setting aside all details, vented marvellous “ processes," and it was discover new and unsuspected meanings told that he and his friend Babbage had in some trite and long accepted proposi- once played a game of chess on the top of tion. But the highest and most appre a coach without board or pieces ! ciated, because the rarest, form is the

His sister has written a simple, unpreironical, which has the subtlest flavor ; tending account of his youth and college with an air of simplicity, or apparent course, which shows that the whole agreement; with a disguised, sarcastic thoughts of this amiable man were bound tone. We have unhappily but few of up with his family. His parents followed these originals; Swift, Sterne, and above his course with equal pride and affection, all, Elia. Here we have perfect ease, and his letters to them are almost engag. without the air of exertion - an indiffering for the simplicity and almost touching ence perhaps. The French excel in this interest exhibited. Even thus early he line, and have an unsurpassed delicacy of began to exhibit the pleasant "Maule touch, adding a sort of malin good-humor vein,” and, when a mere lad, describing to and air of good-will; witness the incom. his father how his pony had shied at a parable Rivarol, who so good-naturedly wagon load of hay, he says, “I thought it cautioned an indifferent author of poems very strange for a horse to be frightened that his MS. was hanging out of his at a load of hay, till I recollected having pocket : “ If they did not know you," he seen people frightened at a drove of oxen, added, “it might be stolen.” It was Riva- who had no objection to a dinner of beef.” rol, too, or some one akin, who, when it This has merit and promise, and is quaint was arranged that he should decide be enough. tween two indifferent works, exclaimed on This interesting and accomplished man hearing the first, I prefer the other.” had ever a standing antipathy to anything Some literal minds have to pause a little like sycophancy or what is called humbefore they can seize these delicate iasin- bug: For many years, when he was at uations. There was a good deal of this the bar, he lost business, though his merit delightful impertinence in the sayings of was fully recognized, owing to his asthat truly original being, Thompson, the sumed cold and distrustful manners to late master of Trinity, whose jests had a clients and solicitors. This was owing to “ quince-like " flavor, and were all of the his determination to avoid all appearance same family.

of courting them, or as it was called “hugMaule, the eminent judicial humoris: ging. Scrupulously fair in his conduct

not "joker” — had this distinct cachet; of cases, he could not endure any exagand the wit-amateur even takes special geration in his brethren. •Talfourd, who delight in his delicious jests, which are had an emotional temperament, used to unhappily but too few. There is a depth work on juries by emotion and the disin them and a something that might be play of sentiment, which his " learned called "sardonic,” were they not the utter-friend,” who was often opposed to him, ances of a truly amiable man. They recur used to neutralize by happy sarcasm or to us regularly, as part of our philosoph. ridicule. ical or intelligent “ baggage ;” much as His accomplishments were extraordione puts up for a journey the little favor- nary. He was familiar with French, Italite * pocket", poet or essayist. It is ian, Spanish, and other languages, and scarcely so well known as it ought to be, could write graceful sonnets in these that this eminent man, instead of being torgues. Lord Brougham used to declare habitually a bitter, or “ cantankerous” per- that he was the only man in London whom son, possessed the most amiable and even he was afraid of in conversation. An odd affectionate of dispositions. He was re- instance is given of his cleverness in markable for his filial and family devotion. “ trifling" matters. He had an extraordi

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nary cleverness in picking locks! and ter of course upon payment of the proper could not only open but close them again, fees and proof of the facts. You might with a simple bit of wire. He once utterly then have lawfully married again. I perconfounded a country locksmith by thus ceive, prisoner, that you scarcely appear opening a portmanteau which had been to understand what I am saying to you, pronounced impregoable.

but let me assure you that these steps are The most memorable and oftenest constantly taken by persons who are dequoted of his utterances is, of course, the sirous to dissolve an unhappy marriage ; one delivered at the Warwick Assizes, on it is true, for the wise man has said it, a the trial of a prisoner for bigamy. The first hated woman when she is married is a wife had taken to drinking, pawned all his thing the earth cannot bear,' and that 'a property, and finally had gone off with her bad wife is to her husband as rottenness paramour. After the lapse of many years to his bones.' You, however, must bear the prisoner married, and now was in this great evil or must adopt the remedy dicted, it was said, at the instigation of prescribed by the Constitution of your her seducer. This hard case moved the country. I see you would tell me that judge to express himself in the matchless these proceedings would cost you £1,000, piece of irony which has excited such ad- and that all your small stock in trade is miration. There have been many versions not worth £100. Perhaps it may be so. of this address, some halting enough; but The law has nothing to say to that; if the one we shall furnish was given in the you had taken these proceedings you Times over thirty years ago, at the mo- would have been free from your present ment when Mrs. Norton's grievances were wife and the woman whom you have secengrossing attention, and seems to be the ondly married would have been a respectamost authentic in form.

ble matron. As you have not done so you Prisoner, you have been convicted stand there a convicted culprit, and it is upon clear evidence ; you have intermar- my duty to pass sentence upon you. You ried with another woman, your wife being will be imprisoned for one day." still alive. You have committed the crime Everything here is perfect, even to the of bigamy. You tell me, and indeed comedy, as it might be called, of the situthe evidence has shown, that your firstation. The prisoner inust have listened wife left her home and her young chil dazed and bewildered, to the grave direcdren to live in adultery with another tions of the judge ; to the things left un

You say this prosecution is an in- done which he ought to have done. But strument of extortion on the part of the Maule was speaking to a greater audience, adulterer. Be it so. I am bound to tell to the empire, and was not thinking of the you that these are circumstances which culprit. The passages underlined are the law does not, in your case, take notice matchless in their ironical earnestness, of. You had no right to take the law into there is no exaggeration, and the effect your own hands. Every Englishmaa is left is as of something almost grotesque. bound to know that when a wrong is done, It has been always repeated that this most the law, or perhaps I should say, the Con- original appeal helped more than anything stitution, affords a remedy. Now listen else to bring about a reform in the mar. to me and I will tell you what you ought riage laws. But the calm, unaffected style to have done. Immediately you heard of of the speaker was half the battle. “How,” your wife's adultery you should have gone says one of his admirers, “ reproduce that to an attorney and directed him to bring inimitable manner which could render the an action against the seducer of your wife. phrase of good-humored sarcasm no conYou should have prepared your evidence, tradiction in terms, which so justly hit instructed counsel, and proved the case in that mysterious focus in which manifest court, and recollect it was imperative intention and assumed unconsciousness that you should recover, I do not say actu- play through one another like the changing ally obtain, substantial damages. Having colors of shot silk.” proceeded thus far, you should have em- No wonder, indeed, that juries were ployed a proctor and instituted a suit in the often mystified by this curious mode of ecclesiastical courts for a divorce a mensa address; it was said that they sometimes et thoro. Your case is a very clear one, took this refined irony as a literal direcand I doubt not you would have obtained tion. Irony is an awkward and often your divorce. After this step your course useless weapon. Let any one try the was quite plain; you had only to obtain a experiment of relating, some delicately private act of Parliament to dissolve your refined saying in a mixed company of marriage. This you would get as a mat- young ladies, or average Scots, and he will

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certainly be chilled and disheartened at men can condescend to play upon the the reception of his jest, which he probably stupidity of others.” will have to explain, or expound, even then Few incidents have been more quoted without making it intelligible. The judge than his sarcasm on the ladies who re. himself used to relate some delightful mained to listen to an unsavory case. specimens of these coups manqués. As When warning had been given, and some when once a man was indicted before him retired precipitately, a few strong-minded for the offence of "wounding with intent ones, as they were called, kept their places. to do bodily harm," and who had, in effect, “ You may now go on," said the judge, stabbed his victim dangerously: The "all the ladies have withdrawn." There couosel who defended made a rather des- is another version, or it might have been perate attempt to argue that it was no another occasion. “Out with it,” he said more than “a common assault,” and, if to the hesitatiog witness, "the ladies don't they came to that conclusion, they should mind it, you needn't be afraid of me.” acquit. This seemed to have made some There is a noble, sarcastic burst of his, impression on the jury. On which the that can be put beside his famous bigamy judge, with much naiveié declared that address, and which must have given a the counsel's view of the law was perfectly twinge to the judge who heard it. When correct. “If, therefore, they were of practising on the circuit, he was engaged opinion that the ripping up the prosecut in a case which had occupied a considor's belly, so as to let out his bowels, had erable time. “ Come, Brother Maule," been done without the intent of doing him said Baron Parke, who was trying the any bodily harm, they should certainly case, can't

you get on a little faster? I acquit him of the more aggravated offence, must be at Stafford to-night.”. and find him guilty of a mere common " I should be most happy to oblige your assault. If, on the other hand, they were Lordship,” was the reply, “ but you see at not of that opinion they should find him present I am not · Brother Maule' but guilty of the previous charge. The too · Brother Robinson'(his client), who has literal jury considered that it was thus not the least wish that your Lordship seriously "left to them" to choose either should get to Stafford to-night; in point course, and after deliberation found the of fact, he does not care a straw whether prisoner guilty only of the lighter offence. your Lordship ever gets to Stafford at all,” There was the same unlucky result in a in which ironical rebuke there is a bitter coining case at the Surrey Assizes, where significance, for it is the story of legions the counsel ingeniously contended that the of unhappy suitors who have been thus coins were so rudely fashioned that no airily sacrificed, their cases “huddled up ordinary person could be deceived. He and hurried over, that judge and counsel further insisted that it was impossible may “get to Stafford to-night," another that the prisoner could have intended to form indeed of prisoners being hung “utter” or “ pass” such clumsy forgeries. “ that jurymen may dine." We can conThe judge again took occasion to say that ceive, indeed, the 'blank astonishment as the counsel had correctly interpreted the the advocate thus bluntly set forth the law. Accordingly if the jury came to the true position of the client. No one, who conclusion that the prisoner did not intend has not travelled “on circuit," can have a to imitate any particular coin of the coun- conception of how unscrupulously clients try, but something else, say a boot-jack or and their cases have been thus dealt with, a pair of nut-crackers, they were of course by “My learned friend, who is conto acquit him. There was good sense and cerned'in other cases," or "retained " at logic in this bit of persiflage, as well as the next town the judge impatient, the fine irony. But the "jolter-headed” jury hapless client, unconscious of the plot, fancied it was a literal direction to them believing that counsel, judge, and jury are to investigate the likeness between the all eager in his interest - having been coin and the other familiar objects, and paid to attend to it. Suddenly there are gave the prisoner the benefit of the doubt. whisperings and consultations, and he is These results must have been vexatious told imperiously that he must agree to enough for the judge. But as was said “this or that; in vain he protests; a truly of him by a sagacious observer, ex- varnished tale is ingeniously presented plaining these little fatalities, “ He had and he is told that he will rue it if he neither the congenial stupidity which en- does not take advice. And so the party at ables men not otherwise remarkable to last happily gets away " to Stafford.” appeal successfully to the stupid, nor that It was the late Mr. Hayward who peculiar form of talent by which some brought story-telling to an art or mystery,

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