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a measure which, he said, was not very likely to receive the sanction of the legislature, nor did he think it adviseable in itself ; the expedient had been fully tried, as far as voluntary compact could carry it, and had been a tended with the most pernicious instead of beneficial effects: not to mention the outrageous excesses into which the people had been led in the enforcing, these agreements, it still left it in the power of the interested and a varicious to draw additional profits from the distresses of the country. The home manufactures were not only vended at the most extravagant price, but all incitement to emulation being removed, they had declined in their quality to the lowest extreme. The second was to encourage by bounties the export trade. But this, he thought, was beginning at the wrong end. Foreign trade could only be fecured by the excellence of the manufactures, and that, he contended, could only be obtained

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permanent and irrevocable participation of the commercial advantages of this “country, when her parliament should permanently and irrevocably secure zn aid out of the surplus of the he editary revo'nue of that kingdom, towards defraying the expence of protećting the general comr merce of the empire in time of peace. Mr. Pitt, after taking a review of what had already been granted to Ireland by the British parliament, observed, That the concessions now proposed to be made to that kingdom, in order to put the two countries on a fair and equal footing, he should reduce to two heads: irst, The importation of the produce f daz" colonies in the West Indies and America through Ireland into Great Britain. Second, A mutual exchange between the two countries of their respective productions and manufactures, upon equal terms. With regard to the first, he allowed it had the appearance of militating against the navigaties laws, for which England had ever had the greatest partiality. But as she had already allowed Ireland to trade immediately and dire&ly with the colonies, he could not see how the impotting of the produce of those colonies circuitously through Ireland into Great Britain could injure the colonial trade of this country, which was a direct ope, and therefore to be made at a less expence and risque, than that which was circuitous. NIn return for these concessions on the part of Great Britain, he proposed that Ireland should agree to the payment of a certain stipulated sum yearly out of the surplus of her he editary revenue, towards defraying the general expences of the empire. Such was the general outline of the proposed system on its first appearance. In the outset, both those within and those without doors seened to comprehend but little, and to be liill less concerned about an obječt of such extent and importance.-A fortnight elapsed before the subječt again made its appearance : during which interim a report, prepared by a committee of the board of trade and plantations, was laid by the minister upon the table of the House of Commons, to affilt its deliberations. This report was stated to be founded upon the declarations and opinions of some of the principal manufactures and merchants in the kingdom, who had been examined by the above-mentioned committee; and its particular object was to prove the expediency of that part of the system which related to reducing the duties payable upon the importation of Irish produce and manufactures into Great Britain, to what the same sort of articles were changed with in this country. In the mean time the merchants and manufacturers who had been examined before the committee, joined by a great number of others from every part of the nation, met together for the purpose of taking the Irish propositions into their consideration.—During the course of their Proceedings it appeared, that the opinions of the to met were in direct contradićtion to the inferences which had been drawn from their examination in the report laid before parliament. Whether this was occasioned by any change which, upon a fuller consideration, had taken place in the od of the meishants and manufacturers then

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N O T E. § 1. That it is highly important to the interest of both countier, that the commerce between Great Britain and Ireland should be finally regulated on permanent and equitable principle, for the mutual bencht of both countries. II. That a full participation of commercial advantages should be permanently secured to Ireland, whenever a provision, equally permanent and secure, shall be made by the parliament of that kingdom towards defraying, in proportion to its growing prosperity, the necessary expences in time of peace, of protecting the trade and general interest of tise empire. , III. That towards carrying into full effect so desirable a settlement, it is fit and proper that all articles, not the growth or manufacture of Great Baitain or Ireland, “except those of the growth, E. or manufacture, of any of the countries yond the Cape of Good Hope to the Streights of Magellan, should be imported into each kingdom from the other reciprocally, under the same regulations, and at the same time, (if subject to duties) to which they “would be" liable when imported directly from the country or placefrom whence the same may have been imported into Great Britain and Ireland respectively, as the case may be ;" and that all duties originally paid on importation into either country respectively, except on arrack and foreign brandy, and on rum, and all forts of strong waters not imported from the British colonies in the West Indies, shall be finally drawn back on exportation to the other. “But, nevertheless, that the duties shall continue to be protected and guarded, as at present, by withholding the drawback, until a certificate from the proper officers of the revenue, in the kingdom to which the export may be made, shall be returned and compared with the entry out

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* 1788. Irish Parliamentary Intelligence.

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