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If it be granted that thought never flops, and that the mind is perpetually employed ; the wonder should rather be, that so few

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millions of the human species through the
whole extent of time have been, during their
state of slumber, continually subject to dream;
perhaps the calculators of chances would be
apt to maintain, that near coincidences have
probably happened much more frequently
than they have been either noticed or recoi.
lected.
Among the various histories of fingular
dreams, and corresponding events, we have
lately heard of one, which seems to merit
having been rescued from oblivion. Its ou-
thenticity will appear from the relation ; and
we may surely pronounce, that a more ex-
traordinary concurrence of fortuitous and
accidental circumstances can scarcely be pro-
duced, or paralleled.
One Adam Rogers, a creditable and dc.
cent person, a man of good sense and re-
pute, who kept a public-house at Portlaw, a
small hamlet, nine or ten miles from Wa-
terford, in the kingdom of Ireland, dreamed
one night that he saw two men at a particu-
largreen spot on the adjoining mountain,
one of them a small fickly looking man, the
other remarkably strong and large. He then
saw the little man murder the other, and he
awoke in great agitation. The circumstances
of the dream were so distinét and forcible,
that he continued much affected by them.
He related them to his wife, and also to se-
veral neighbours, next morning. In some
time he went out coursing with grey hounds,
accompanied, amongst others, by one Mr.
Browne, the Roman Catholic priest of the
parish. He soon stopped at the above-men-
tioned particular green spot on the moun-
tain, and calling to Mr. Browne, pointed it
out to him, and told him what had appeared
in his dream. During the remainder of the
next day he thought little more about it.
Next morning, he was extremely startled at
seeing two strangers enter his house, about
eleven o'clock in the forenoon. He imme-
diately ran into an inner-room, and desired
his wife to take particular notice, for they
were precisely the two men that he had seen
in his dream. When they had consulted
with one another, their apprehensions were
alarmed for the little weakly man, though
contrary to the appearance in the dream.
After the strangers had taken some refresh-
ment, and were about to depart, in order to
prosecute their journey, Rogers earnestly en-
deavoured to dissuade the little man train
quitting his house, and going on with his
fellow-traveller. He assured him, that if he
would remain with him that day, he would
accompany him to Carrick the next morn-
ing, that being the town to which the tra-
vellers

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