Oldalképek
PDF
ePub
[blocks in formation]

" And there was a child, but eight at best,

Who went his way in a sea we shipped, All the while holding upon his breast

A little pet parrot whose wings were clipped. And as the boy and the bird went by,

Swingiąg away on a tall wave's crest, They were grappled by a man with a drowning cry,

And together the three went down to rest.

" And so the crew went one by one,

Some with gladness, and few with fear; Cold and hardship such work had done

That few seemed frightened when death was near. Thus every soul on board went down

Sailor and passenger, little and great; The last that sank was a man of my town,

A capital swimmer--the second mate.”

• Now, lonely Fisherman, who are you,

That say you saw this terrible wreck ? How do I know what you say is true,

When every mortal was swept from the deck ? Where were you in that hour of death?

How do you know what you relate ?" His answer came in an under-breath• Master, I was the second mate!”

LI.

THE SKY-LARK.

JAMES HOGG.

Bird of the wilderness,

Blithesome and cumberless,
Sweet be thy matin o'er moorland and lea!

Emblem of happiness,

Blest is thy dwelling-place,
Oh to abide in the desert with thee!

Wild is thy lay, and loud,

Far in the downy cloud,
Love gives it energy, love gave it birth.

Where, on thy dewy wing,

Where art thou journeying ?
Thy lay is in heaven, thy love is on earth.

O'er fell and fountain sheen,

O’er moor and mountain green,
O'er the red streamers that herald*he day,

Over the cloudlet dim,

Over the rainbow's rim,
Musical cherub, soar, singing away!

Then, when the gloaming comes,

Low in the heather blooms,
Sweet will thy welcome and bed of love be!

Emblem of happiness,

Blest is thy dwelling-place-
Oh to abide in the desert with thee!

LII.

FANATICISM.

CHARLES SUMNER_1856.

The Senator from South Carolina denounces opposition to the usurpation in Kansas as an uncalculating fanaticism. Sir, fanaticism is found in an enthusiasm or exaggeration of opinions, particularly on religious subjects; but there may be a fanaticism for evil as well as for good. Now, I will not deny that there are persons among us loving liberty too well for their personal good, in a selfish generation, Such there may be, and, for the sake of their example, would that there were more! In calling them “fanatics,” you would cast contumely upon the noble army of martyrs, from the earliest day down to this hour; upon the great tribunes of human rights, by whom life, liberty, and happiness on earth, have been secured; upon the long line of devoted patriots, who, throughout history, have truly loved their country; and upon all who, in noble aspirations for the general good, and in forgetfulness of self, have stood out before their age, and gathered into their generous bosoms the shafts of tyranny and wrong; in order to make a pathway for truth. You discredit Luther, when alone he nailed his articles to the door of the church at Wittenburg, and then, to the imperial demand that he should retract, firmly replied, "Here I stand; I cannot do otherwise, so help me God!" You discredit Hampden, when alone he refused to pay the few shillings of ship-money, and shook the throne of Charles I.; you discredit Milton, when, amidst the corruptions of a heartless court, he lived on, the lofty friend of liberty, above question or suspicion ; you discredit Russell and Sidney, when, for the sake of their country, they calmly turned from family and friends, to tread the narrow steps of the scaffold; you discredit the early founders of American institutions, who preferred the hardships of a wilderness, surrounded by a savage foe, to injustice on beds of ease; you discredit our later fathers, who, few in numbers, and weak in resources, yet strong in their cause, did not hesitate to brave the mighty power of England, already encircling the globe with her morning drum-beats. Yes, sir, of such are the fanatics of history, according to the Senator.*

IIII.

THE GERMAN'S BELL.

Hi up in de shteeble dare hangs de pell, un
Every day tree times comes der schneider man
Un bulls de rope so dat he makes de pell speag,

*Butler.

On seven, on zwolf, und at noin o'glock in de
Nite. Den ef dare meetin mit bolitix, oder
Speeches, oder shows, he likewise de rope
Does bull. Ef de breechen time comes, und de
Beeples valk togedder to worship Got,
Und gits der childs baptized, den too
De pig veel fast mit de pell goes rount,
One vay unt todder rich makes ding dong.
Un ef de peebles is glad und comes togedder
Und holler, und say it is de four of Ghuly,
Dat pell do speag loud un make a krat noise.
Yaw, und ef you goes over Chordan it speaks
Shlow und grand, shust like valkin to a barrien.
Ven de chudge comes here und otter beeples
De pell must ring shure.

Ef it rains, oder snows, oder is hot wedder
As vill burn bowder ; oder ef it is golt as vill
Vreeze wit de mittens off; oder if it pees
Tark as you not can see un inch, oder de glouts
Is pig un dick -

no otts

de pell rings.
So Meister Peck, de tailor man, is shust so certain
As de patch in his bogget.
Oh, if he dies order gits kilt, vot shall ve do!

LIV.

TO THE GRADUATING CLASS OF COLUMBIA COLLH N.

CHARLES KING -1861.

My young friends, you enter upon life at the very moment this great question of secession is under the issue of war. Shrink not back from it. We must be decided now and forever. The baleful doctrine of secession must be finally and absolutely renounced. The poor quibble of double allegiance must be disavowed. An American ---and not a New Yorker, nor a Virginian-is the noble title by which we are to live, and which you, my young friends, must in your respective spheres, contribute to make live, whatever it may cost in blood and money.

Go forth, then, my young 'friends--go forth as citizens of the great continental American Republic--to which your first, your constant, your latest hopes in life should attach--and abating no jot of obedience to the municipal or State authority within the respective limits of each-bear yourselves always, and every where, as Americans--as fellow-countrymen of Adams, and Ellsworth, and Jay, and Jefferson, and Carroll, and Washington, and Pinckneyas heirs of the glories of Bunker Hill, and Saratoga, and Monmouth, and Yorktown, and Eutaw Springs, and New Orleans, and suffer no traitor hordes to despoil you of so rich an inheritance or so grand and glorious a country.

LV.

SECESSION AND FOREIGN POWERS.

EDWARD EVERETT -1861.

Let it be remembered that in granting to the seceding States, jointly and severally, the right to leave the Union, we concede to them the right of resuming, if they please, their former allegiance to England, France and Spain. It rests with them, with any one of them, if the right of secession is admitted, again to plant a European government side by side with that of the United States on the soil of America; and it is by no means the most improbable upshot of this ill-starred rebellion, if allowed to prosper. Is this the Monroe doctrine, for which the United States have been contending?

The disunion press in Virginia last year openly encouraged the idea of a French protectorate, and her legislature has, I believe, sold out the James River canal, the darling enterprise of Washington, to a company in France supposed to enjoy the countenance of the Emperor. The seceding patriots of South Carolina were understood by the correspondent of the London " Times” to admit that they would rather be subject to a British prince, than to the Government of the United States. Whether they desire it or not, the moment the seceders lose the protection of the United States, they hold their

« ElőzőTovább »