Sir Christopher Wren and His Times

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Chapman & Hall, 1852 - 436 oldal

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65. oldal - When I was yet a child, no childish play To me was pleasing ; all my mind was set Serious to learn and know, and thence to do What might be public good; myself I thought Born to that end, born to promote all truth, All righteous things...
149. oldal - The mention of my wife's arrival puts me in mind to desire you to put that compliment upon her, that her entrance into the town may be with more decency than the ways will now suffer it to be : and, to that purpose, I pray you would quickly pass such laws as are before you, in order to the mending those ways; and that she may not find Whitehall surrounded with water.
201. oldal - Up, and put on my coloured silk suit, very fine, and my new periwig, bought a good while since, but durst not wear, because the plague was in Westminster when I bought it; and it is a wonder what will be the fashion after the plague is done, as to periwigs, for nobody will dare to buy any hair, for fear of the infection, that it had been cut off the heads of people dead of the plague My Lord Brouncker, Sir J.
82. oldal - Those morning haunts are where they should be, at home ; not sleeping, or concocting the surfeits of an irregular feast, but up and stirring, in winter often ere the sound of any bell awake men to labour, or to devotion ; in summer as oft with the bird that first rouses, or not much tardier,* to read good authors, or cause them to be read, till the attention be weary, or memory have its full fraught : then, with useful and generous labours preserving the body's health and hardiness...
72. oldal - COME thou, who art the wine and wit Of all I've writ ; The grace, the glorie, and the best Piece of the rest. Thou art, of what I did intend, The all and end ; And what was made, was made to meet Thee, thee, my sheet.
72. oldal - TO LAURELS. A FUNERAL stone Or verse I covet none, But only crave Of you that I may have A sacred laurel springing from my grave: Which being seen, Blest with perpetual green, May grow to be Not so much call'da tree As the eternal monument of me.
73. oldal - Alike i' th' dust. Nor need we here to fear the frown Of Court or Crown: Where fortune bears no sway o'er things, There all are Kings. In this securer place we'll keep As...
82. oldal - ... to read good authors, or cause them to be read, till the attention be weary, or memory have its full fraught ; then with useful and generous labours preserving the body's health and hardiness to render lightsome, clear, and not lumpish obedience to the mind, to the cause of religion, and our country's liberty...
84. oldal - This great Prelate had the good humour of a Gentleman, the eloquence of an Orator, the fancy of a Poet, the acuteness of a Schoolman, the profoundness of a Philosopher, the wisdom of a Chancellor, the sagacity of a Prophet, the reason of an Angel, and the piety of a Saint.
227. oldal - The noise and cracking and thunder of the impetuous flames, the shrieking of women and children, the hurry of people, the fall of towers, houses, and churches...

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