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Northampton, Bitterswell, where he and nevolence.” Elsewhere he speaks of “one Mrs. Twining made a long stay with Mr. of the greatest comforts of travelling, the Powell, “the Pastor and his Pastorella,” being known to nobody," and declines an getting a good deal of music (of course he introduction to some one at Nottingham, had his fiddle with him). Here he noted “unless there is anything curious there the difference, which must have been strik. which could not possibly be got at without ing in the England of that day, between his help.” When he got back his horses an enclosed, and therefore « clothed," seemed “much better for the business village like Claybrook, and Bitterswell, they had done. Mrs. T., too, is jollified, which, being unenclosed, was “as bare as and wholesomely embrowned.” What a if some demon had brushed away all the picture all this gives of England as it was; hedges, trees, and plantations with his what a contrast between Matlock with its great elbow." Herein our country still two hotels and the Heights of Abraham, contrasts disadvantageously with some a climb a little less noteworthy then than parts of the Continent; public spirit in one of the minor Alps is now, and the western Germany, for instance, has here Matlock into which trip trains disgorge and there planted almost every their crowds, while the said Heights are

with trees, the timber and fruit of thronged, and the fern-caves are littered which not only help to pay the rates but in with sandwich papers and corks and many cases yield a surplus. In England broken bottles! While we are on the subthere were but few instances of planting ject of scenery, it will be well to pass over until by enclosure the land had become several years, and to see what our writer private property. It is strange to find says of that Wales of which he had so not a word about the Northamptonshire often talked, and which his brother, had churches, with their broach-spires and seen some years before.

There an eye long chancels. The county contains two blasé of Yorkshire dales and moors and Eleanor Crosses, and several specimens "edges," might well hope for something of that " long and short" building which startling. “I am tired," he says, when is set down as “Saxon;" but of these Mr. chaffing his brother about the likeness of Twining is silent, as he is of the curious Continental scenery to that which he had churches in Northampton itself. His ver- seen at home, "of this little variety of dict simply is: “ The town likes me well; combination where the materials are the we breakfasted there and walked about. same. Give me a country where the trees 'Tis one of the neatest and handsomest I grow bottom upwards, or where men con

Went to the new hospital.” verse by blowing their.noses in different From Northampton, by way of Leicester tones, or express violent grief by a horse and Derby, to Matlock, of which he says laugh, and cry when they are merry." He to his brother: “You know it; so I am went to Wales to see his friend Mr. happily released from attempting descrip. Hughes, of Llanvorog, near Ruthin, in tion that describes nothing. Yet he tells 1797, the year after his wife's death, of him how he and his wife scaled the Heights which event, by the way, the letters do of Abraham. " It was bold for Mrs. not contain a single word, so carefully Twining at least; but, thank God, she was have purely domestic matters been exquite bonny, and we actually performed cluded in the selection. The hills near the feat. I am a stranger to mountains, Llangollen were the steepest he had ever and never yet seemed so ballooned and encountered; his servant's horse, which above the globe as in ascending this great had light web-traces fastened to it for the hill, for your mountaineers, I suppose, will purpose, was every now and then fastened allow it no other name. If it is not sub-to the chaise-shafts. He at once plunges lime from its height, it is, however, from into Welsh legends — his landlady telling its steepness. We were at Saxton's, him about Corwena and the two giant not Mason's. You know my maxim of pre- brothers, “whose story is very fine in the ferring secondary houses to first. Every- Welsh ” — and into Welsh consonantbody goes to Mason's; now, everybody is changes, noting how Voel Vama is, by a body that I never wish to meet. what rule he cannot learn, altered from Surround me with good company,' a Moel Mama. He hears a sermon in crowd of ladies and gentlemen, and Mat- Welsh, and is “much gratified at the lock itself becomes worse than Hockley- sound of the venerable language; it was in-the-Hole. But when you view these not at all harsh or uncouth to my ear; the things in quiet, nothing so soothes a gutturals were soft, dérobés, and inoffensorrowing mind, nothing so conduces to Sive.” After twelve days of " charming perfect complacency, and therefore to be. I little excursions,” he and the Hugheses

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and some other friends set off on a driv- being quiet; of sitting still and letting ing and riding expedition. He has with pleasure come to one instead of having to him his nephew Daniel, and at the second run after it. Some philosophers make the .stage meets brother Richard and his son. happiness of Heaven consist in sitting Llanrwst strikes him as “like Matlock on still and wanting nothing, motion implying a far grander scale;" but his complaint imperfection. However, in a day or two that the bleak, barren hills make the drive I found myself as human and imperfect and dreary and comfortless shows that he was as ready to encounter the inconvenience not fully alive to the charms of wild of travelling for the sake of its pleasures scenery. The waterfalls delight him im- as I ever was.” In all this tour, in which mensely. He sits close by,"" the noise he notices the old-world look of the Welsh seeming to grow louder and louder, and shops, “though Shrewsbury is so near at the water more and more angry. There hand,” and puts in a protest against Mil. is something very fine in the sensation of ton's "trim gardens, preferring the being perfectly safe while death is staring wilder grounds of the Welsh parsonages, you in the face within an inch of your he says not a word about the spiritual state

It is sweet to sit and see others in of the people, their feelings towards the danger while you are safe, but it is sweeter Established Church, etc. One must not to see the danger that nobody is in so decry as superficial what was never meant near as to give you the feel of being in it to be anything else; but it is certainly yourself, while this imaginary and volun- strange that in the intimacy of correspontary terror is immediately turned into dence with a brother we do not find a pleasure by the consciousness of perfect word about the inner life of the people. safety. Even a Twining may face danger Even brother Richard is less reticent on in this manner” (he was always twitting this point. He remarks, for instance, that the family with being altogether unheroic, intemperance is out of fashion in Wales; as where he says he had to fight his way they warned me not to take a second through his classics at college proprio glass of ale, adding, “It's stronger than marte, “the only sort of Mars that a you think.” He notices that “ Parson Twining is constructed to have anything Evans spoke English with the whine of to do with "'). *

his native language." He “reads Ma. This tour took eleven days, and it is son's Caractacus' in Mona amid scenery curious in these railroad times to note our which belied the poem.". Richard's jourauthor's lament over the hurry-"to have ney home was not at all in his brother's seen all comfortably, sufficiently, and qui- leisurely style. He drove back to Isleetly would have required three weeks or a worth without stopping, except to change month.” "

Intemperance in sight-seeing " horses, thirty-five hours on end ; " felt the he takes to be as great a mistake as in- first hundred miles very much, but got temperance in other things; but then he strong as I went on.” Thomas, travelling was soon satisfied ; "all entertainments slowly as usual, got to Lichfield, and, are too long for me. Music has been, and hearing his old friend Archdeacon Egeris, one of the greatest charms of my life, ton Leigh was in residence, he determined and nothing has fatigued me oftener.' At to play him a trick, which is best deConway he hears a good harper, having scribed in his own words : “ As soon as I at other places been pestered with mod. had dined, I called and refused to send in ern tunes, ill-played upon a harsh, noisy my name. He came to me into the pasinstrument. The playing affected me sage, peering and scowling at me with his even to tears; it would not at all have hand over his eyes, as much as to say, this effect on me in England." Near What can the fellow want?' I made Bethgelert he is delighted at coming upon him a sneaking bow. Sir, I hope no a lovely valley, "of which we have never offence, sir. Knowing the benevolence of heard before." And then follows a dia- your character, and your generous dispositribe against “Sir Tasteless Seeall, and tion, I take the liberty to wait upon you. tourists who travel with a catalogue in I am a clergyman, sir, and in distress, as their pockets of things to be seen.

." Back you may see, sir, by my coat.' 'Oh, sir, at Llanvorog, he enjoys “the luxury of indeed I can't

. I have many such appli

cations as this; but I know nothing of • It is hardly fair to stigmatize as cowardice his you, and I never attend -- I make it a hasty chaise journey to Cambridge in November, 1803, rule 'Sir, excuse me, but knowing was in residence, and so the widower needed linile your character for learning, and particuextra inducement for what became a very pleasant visit, larly, sir, your skill in the Greek lan. described in two very pleasant letters

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know nothing of the matter •I much for me," and a black-letter Chaucer. thought I might take the liberty to solicit"What a painstaking, thorough-paced, your encouragement for a little [pulling thorough-stitched man you are when you papers out of my pocket] treatise I have set about anything! I never read a blackwritten, sir; the title of it, sir, is čori ooi lettered book in my life. And then, you've Toivoua;' [referring to a circumstance of read all Juvenal and all Quintilian." Deour college life which I took it for granted spite his quizzing, he had an unlimited would open his eyes). He replied : 'No, admiration for the head of the house. In sir, indeed, I can't say anything to it. one of his last letters he says, with an You must excuse me.' 'Sir, I am very unusual display of feeling: “As to your sorry. I thought that as I once had the earnestness in whatever active part you do pleasure of knowing you - • Knowing take, I heartily wish every part of your

Indeed I don't know you.' I constitution were as good as that. then smiled, said nothing, but held out Keep your heart where it is and what it is. my hand. He would not take it, but And whenever it pushes you into a crowd sbrunk back, and declared he had not the don't be ashamed of it, but go on, and look least knowledge of me. Then at last, back with a smile of pity upon us idle fel. • What!' quoth I, don't you know Twin- lows gaping and stretching on our beds of ing?' I shall never forget his change of roses. This brother's foreign tour was countenance. Nothing could answer bet- begun in August, 1781. The party took ter than my trick; it was a fine dramatic boat at Margate for Ostend ; thence by αναγνώρισις." The inscription on Gar- barque to Bruges, where Richard talks rick's monument in Lichfield Cathedral he much of the supposed Michael Angelo strongly objects to, because “it commem- Virgin and Child, " said to have been orates his dramatic powers. . . . When a captured” (others say shipwrecked) man's good qualities are enumerated on its way to Engiand. Lord Leicester” (it his tomb it must always be understood as was really Horace Walpole) "offered saying, 'As he was a good man, we hope £4.000 for it.” He also mentions the he has gone to heaven;' but the idea of bronze-gilt tombs of Charles the Bold and his being the more likely to go to heaven his daughter Mary, and the burial place for his dramatic powers is perfectly ab- of Van Eyck; but he does not seem even

urd.” For Garrick he professes the pro to have heard of the wonderful paintings foundest admiration; but in 1782 he tells of Hans Memling in the Hospital of St. his brother that he has not read a word John, nor at Ghent does he say a word about Mrs. Siddons, and is sick of the about Van Eyck's “Adoration of the cant of theatrical criticism. Richard is Lamb." At Tongres he turns to his freer in giving his opinion; thinks that Cæsar, and talks of Atuatuca. Liége was '" Kemble will improve as Hamlet. He then under the mild rule of the prince did badly his angels and ministers of bishops, which, despite many bloody revgrace' - was too labored and mouthing. olutions, lasted till 1794. The place was But the closet scene was exquisite, and so a paradise of priests; "the bishopric is a was that where he enjoins secrecy on the grand piece of preferment, £25,000 a year. players.". This Richard was an active The bishop is chosen out of their own man of business - added to his other body by the seventy Trefoniers (canons of cares the duties of East India director; St. Lambert), who'must all be of noble Thomas often laughingly scolds him for birth, with ever so many quarterings.” working too hard “it

is not for the good Stavelot, pear Spa, belongs far more than of the family that your life should be Liége to the old order of things. The very shortened.” He also frequently helps memory of its prior, who kept a dozen sol. him in his Latin. Richard at sixteen was diers (the Liége army was one thousand), taken from Eton to manage the Strand and who (says Richard) “ ranked higher shop for his widowed mother. He brought than the prince bishop, though he need with him an intense love of classics; used not be of noble birth,” has passed away. to send Thomas Virgil translations to be Neither he, nor the Coo Cascade into corrected. Heyne's notes, “ten times which the crowd of beggars used to fing harder than anything in Cicero,” he found dogs to amuse the tourists, are even men. troublesome; but Thomas recommended tioned in Murray. At Spa Richard found them as good, useful, rough exercise. that the ladies all paint, and sit their horses His own love of quiet he often contrasts astraddle; and at balls frizzle tbeir hair and with Richard's "love of a bustle.” He use brown powder. It is not an edifying quizzes him for studying not classics only society. The most striking figure is the but Warton, " which I think would be too l baron De Haindel, from Strasburg, who

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wears diamond and amethyst buttons on established that it was not shaken when, his absurdly fashioned coat, has a Circas- by-and-by, the tax came to be replaced, sian mistress, and seșvants who show their owing to the great expenses of the war, dignity by wearing three watches, and and lasted till free trade was forced upon who drives and rides up and down the the Chinese. He had a peep at Heyne, crowded streets at full speed. Then there who began life as a weaver, and till he is the apostolic nuncio, “fat, with sinister was twenty-nine knew not Virgil even by eyes, always laughing, and playing cards name." The great man, to whom he morning, noon, and night.” A public promised a copy of his brother's “ Arisbreakfast, given by Prince Henry of Prus- totle" a gift which called forth the sia, atoned to Richard Twining for the ponderous Latin letter published in vol. i. undesirableness of much of the company. was at Göttingen, lecturing in German He also talked over with Major Parsons about ancient painting to only ten stu. the early scenes of the American War, dents! Like a good brother, he boasts of hearing how, on the eighteen days' march the “ Aristotle," and begş Heyne to speak to Bunker's Hill, the men went 'mad with well of it, and thinks he has induced him the heat, being forced to travel by day for to do so, "for men are biassed, if ever so fear of ambushes. One lady, Richard, impartial, by such courtesy.” At Hanover who has a penchant for pretty women, he had the pleasure of seeing a good deal goes into raptures about, the daughter of the Dukes of Cumberland and Cam. of the grand duke of Hesse Darmstadt: bridge: “Is not it a fine thing to have a “She has one of the inost dangerous dim- young prince with a star hanging on to ples I ever saw. If the Prince of Wales your arm?”. The princes are remarkably would make her a good husband, I wish courteous, giving due honor to the house he would marry her. If he was not to of Twining. Mrs. Twining is shown the prove good to her, I'd never swear alle. library and the “prancing creams," and giance to him.” At Cologne be goes to she and her husband dine (at 2 P. M.) with see nothing but the ugly Rubens repre- the princes, “all being quiet and methodsenting Peter crucified head downwards. ical, not like the English hurry.” Here But he begins at once to admire the they meet Professor Schlöger's daughter, Rhine; on which, when he has seen it at who had anticipated these modern days St. Goar, his verdict is: “ I never saw any- by being a Ph.D., passing in anatomy, thing so fine. The Rhine will become natural philosophy, music, and eight lanthe chief object of my affections, though guages, and being, moreover, an adept in the tolls counteract the benevolent inten- dressmaking. Nor does he neglect scentions of nature.” At Hanau not a word ery. Here is what he says of the neighabout Barbarossa, but a good deal about borhood of Spa: " It seems as if nature, an innkeeper, who, having come in for a apprehensive that her character might fortune, prefers keeping on the paternal suffer from the insipidity of Flanders, was inn because it gives him a lot of company, determined to give here an ample proof “the worthy among whom he solemnly of her creative powers. Mountains are salutes on both cheeks.” He is astonished seen on every side varying in shape and that the Rhineland peasants offered feature. Narrow valleys and deep grapes “and expected no douceur;" he is glens may be discovered from many yet more astonished at the waltz which he points; and the cheerful town of Spa is sees danced at Frankfort after dinner (two often a must pleasing addition to the o'clock): “ You'd think they were going scene. .. Not far off a part of the moun. to wrestle." At Frankfort, too, he sees a tain boldly thrusts itself forward and af. ballet, "the sort of thing which is ruining fords a most noble prospect. . . . In fact, the singing in operas." At Antwerp, the principal produce of the ecclesiastical which was then “a Marquisate of the prince of Stavelot, whose territory, we Holy Roman Empire," the emperor was soon enter on our way to the Cascade of trying to get up an East Indian Company, Coo, appears to be prospects (vol. ii., " which I fear may be prejudicial to us p. 30). by stocking that market to which our At Spa he just missed, to his great resmugglers resort.” So it proved, till gret, meeting the emperor (son of Maria Pitt's Commutation Act changed the cent. Theresa), about whom he cannot resist per cent. duty on tea for a window tax, telling the following story: " While he plus an ad valorem tea duty of from 24d. was there the Duchess of Chandos recomto 6fd. a pound. This ruined the Dutch mended him to marry, and advised the smugglers, and enabled the Twinings “to princess royal of England. "Too young,' drive a roaring trade,” which got so firmly I said the emperor. "Oh! not at all; I'm

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many years younger than the duke, and yet Why I write seldom is not because the we live very happily together.' 'Differ- intention is hard, but the obligation. I ent religions!'* Nowadays nobody at. will not be forced to write ; but when I tends to religion in matters of that sort.' write I write.” The emperor smiled.” After seeing the Richard, active in travels as in all Jews’ quarter at Frankfort he reflects: things, made (his grandson tells us) twelve

Strange that so numerous a people (as tours, going on horseback with saddlebags the Jews), many of them residing in the etc., till he married, when he set up a most polished parts of Europe, should phaeton and a pair of ponies. His son neither enjoy an equality with their fellow- made eight, going througlı France as far creatures nor have to all appearance the as Chartres when he was eighty. most distant prospect of acquiring it. Richard reciprocated in equal measure Such of them as have had the benefit of a the affection of his clergyman brother. liberal education (he may mean Moses He worries himself about the preface Mendelssohn, who died a few years be to the “ Aristotle," and whether "abili. fore) have in general reaped full advantage ties and utility” is too great a jingle. from it."

He shares his brother's feelings about Love of scenery and travelling were, France : "I can't comprehend what those however, in this family, not confined to French liberty boys are about.” He en. one generation. In 1834 Richard the sec-joys an evening during which Mason and ond is at Hanover, and has a long talk Bishop Hurd were "snubbing and snapwith the viceroy, the very Duke of Cam- ping at each other;" and he records with bridge by whom his father had been hos manifest zest a saying or two of “the ponpitably received nearly half a century derous Dr. Parr:""The name of Twinbefore. His letters to Richard the third, ing has long been endeared to my mind the compiler of these volumes, giving him by the intellectual and moral excellences the whole course of his travels abroad, of the persons to whom it belonged;” and form the pleasantest part of the “Sequel.” “I should like to bear a direct and lumiThe volume is made up with a letter or nous testimony to the transcendent merits two from Thomas, son of the eldest Rich- of your brother's • Aristotle.'” ard, a “writer” in the East India Com. There is little more to tell. Both brothpany's service, who in 1794 " interviews ers had in their quiet way a great affection the Great Mogul in his glory." There is for their mother; both were fond of a joke. also a letter from Preston, son of a West- Thus Parson Thomas, in a letter of admoreland innkeeper who had entertained vice to his nephew at college, says: 6. It the Pretender on his way to Derby. For is a wide and common field, 'the fences thirty years he had been bookkeeper to now (I fear) almost all thrown down, and the Twinings; and, “indifferent to holi- even while they remained they were easily days, caring little for amusements, not climbed over. To stand firmly a man grumbling at long hours despite the small. must have the murus aeneus in his own ness of his salary, he found his sole relax- heart; and so as niuch brass in your in. ation in the Westmoreland Society, and side, and as little in your face (my dear) his comfort in putting his savings into as you please. I think in college it used short annuities for himself and his sister.” | to be the fashion in my time to wear it After his retirement he was for some time chiefly upon the face." And when Richworried with the fear that the annuities ard tells him he saw their crest on the would cease before the lives had dropped. chariot of a Pembrokeshire gentleman The firm set him at ease on this point; named Twinning, he replies : " I see now and then he lived cheerily on in his native what it is in my blood that makes me so air till fourscore years and ten. His ac- immoderately fond of toasted cheese, and count of his journey to Westmoreland, onions which are akin to leeks.". His fun vid Bath and Bristol, partly by mail, partly reminds us of Cowper's in his lighter by post, shows more clearly than even the moods. He and Dr. Burney, chatting in Twining letters do, the very different con- letters, discussing whether the dialogues ditions of travel at the end of the last in the Greek plays were not sung in recicentury:

tative, and whether in a song the words Besides this, the volume contains some should or should not be distinct, and the of Thomas's Latin poems, of which he relative merits of the harpsichord and the was proud, and yet more of his apologies newly introduced piano, are always amusfor that inertness which is contrasted with ing. Thomas Twining gets from the doc. his brother's activity. His brother's let- tor all the gossip about Dr. Johnson's ters he calls “letterlings;" and says, ' death – how Sir J. Hawkins would not

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