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PRINCETON REVIEW,

MESSRS. CHARLES SCRIBNER & 654 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.

AND

PUBLISHED BY

CO.

This able and influential journal has now completed its forty-first year. It has outlived religious quarterlies in being at the time of its origin, and is, with a single exception, the quarterly of any kind in the country. This is a strong token of the soundness and vitality principles, and of the ability with which it has been conducted.

The Rev. CHARLES HODGE, D.D., and Rev. LYMAN H. ATWATER, D.D., associate editors, will re the special co-operation of Rev. M. W. JACOBUS, D.D., Rev. WM. HENRY GREEN, D.D., Rev. E HALL, D.D., President CHARLES A. AIKEN, Rev. JOHN FORSYTH, D.D., and Rev. WM. M. BLACK D.D., while contributions are promised by others, including authors of the highest rank an f

With these arrangements, it is intended that this Review shall not only retain the attri which have made it a great power for good in the past, but that it shall be constantly improved amplified in the future.

While it will continue to support, with whatever ability it can command, the great syste doctrine defined in the Westminster symbols, which are adopted by all the Presbyterian bodi America and Great Britain, and, to a considerable extent, by other communions, and to deal science, philosophy, and literature at their points of contact with religion, it will labor earnest cement and consolidate the Re-union of the Presbyterian Church in truth, charity, and unity: make it a blessing to the church and the world. Having been firmly established years befor schism of 1838, the Princeton Review will strive to do its part in moulding the future of the Re Church in accordance with the standards which form the basis of the re-union.

A special aim of its editors will be to increase the number and variety of its articles practical department; to furnish new aid to pastors and others in charge of Christian and work, for its effective organization and prosecution, by the thorough discussion of questions tive to worship, preaching, pastoral visitation, Sunday-schools, revivals, missions, education, tian beneficence and activity, church architecture and music; in short, whatever may be fi infuse intelligence, energy, and enterprise into any sphere of Christian life and action. In a it will aim to be a helper of ministers and intelligent laymen.

No efforts will be spared to extend and improve the department of criticism, and of accou new publications-especially those relating to our common Christianity.

Its contributors, constantly increasing, now include some of the ablest writers in the Amer Church.

TERMS:

Three Dollars a year, in advance. For Five Dollars, strictly in advance, it wil sent two years to the same subscriber, or for one year to any existing subscri and a new one. We will also send it, for the years 1869 and 1870, to those w will send Four Dollars.

SPECIAL NOTICE.

By the liberality of gentlemen desirous to extend the benefit of this valuable journai to Minis otherwise unable to take it, we are enabled to send it for the coming year to every Presbyte Pastor, or stated supply, whose salary is not over $1,000 per annum, on the receipt of One Do and for both 1869 and 1870 on the receipt of Two Dollars, until the supply set apart for this pose is exhausted. Those who desire to avail themselves of this offer will see the need of pro

ness.

CHARLES SCRIBNER & Co.,

654 BROADWAY, NEW YOR

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66

THE

BIBLICAL REPERTORY

Rev. M. W. JACOBUS, D.D.

44

PRINCETON REVIEW.

AND

EDITED BY

CHARLES HODGE, D.D.; LYMAN H. ATWATER, D.D.

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WM. HENRY GREEN, D.D.

EDWIN HALL, D.D.

WITH THE SPECIAL CO-OPERATION

OP

NEW YORK:

PUBLISHED BY

President C. A. AIKEN.
Rev. JOHN FORSYTH, D.D.
46 WM. M. BLACKBURN.

CHARLES SCRIBNER & CO., 654 BROADWAY:

AND SUBSCRIPTIONS RECEIVED BY

SMITH, ENGLISH & CO., AND PETER WALKER, PHILADELPHIA, STELLE & SMITH, PRINCETON; REV. A. KENNEDY, LONDON, C. W.;

REV. WILLIAM ELDER, ST. JOHN, NEW BRUNSWICK;
REV. ROBERT MURRAY, HALIFAX, N. S.;
TRÜBNER & CO., LONDON.

Published Quarterly. Price $3 per annum.

CONTENTS OF NO. II.

APRIL, 1870.

I.—The Element of Time in Interpreting the Ways of God

II.-Pantheism as a Phase in Philosophy and Theory of History. 206

III-Memoir of Dr. Raffles

217

IV. The Relation of Adam's First Sin to the Fall of the Race

239

V.-The Witness of Paul to Christ

263

279

cation.

ART.

ART.

ART.

ART.

ART.

ART. VI.-The Christian giving for the Times.

ART. VII.--Brief Suggestions on Presbyterian Reconstruction and Unifi

ART. VIII.-Recent Publications on the School Question .

ART. IX.-Notices of Recent Publications

ART.

X.-Literary Intelligence.

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The Editors of this Journal, while responsible for the general character of its contents, cannot be understood to indorse every paragraph contained in the articles of contributors. Nor, on the other hand, can they permit its known principles to be assailed, or the articles it publishes to be uncourteously attacked, upon its pages.

All communications containing orders, remittances, or other matters relating to the business department of the Princeton Review, should be directed to CHARLES SCRIBNER & Co., 654 Broadway, New York. All communications relative to the Editorial Department, including publications for notice, should be sent to the Editors of the Princeton Review, Princeton, New Jersey.

THE

PRINCETON

REVIEW

APRIL, 1870.

No. II.

ART. I.-The Element of Time in Interpreting the Ways of God." One day is with the Lord as a thousand years, and a thousand years as one day.

""

THE schemes of the Divine Government are doubtless all formed in infinite wisdom and goodness, and must, therefore, necessarily be holy, just, and good. But, why should creatures like us expect to comprehend them so perfectly as, in all cases, to perceive their goodness or their wisdom? They concern a whole universe. They reach through eternity. To beings of our limited capacity it may be impossible to give so complete a view of many of the vast designs of God, that no darkness or clouds shall surround them. Why should they not often prove baffling to our reason, and full of mystery? Besides this, the Lord intends to exercise and prove our faith.

What is true of the great purposes of the Divine Government, should seem to be also necessarily true of the great lessons embraced in the essential doctrines of Revelation. The Fall; the ruin of mankind by the sin of their first parents; the union of the two natures-the Godhead and Manhoodin the one person of Christ; the satisfaction of Divine Justice by the sacrifice of Christ, instead of the punishment of the 13

VOL. XLII.—NO. II.

sinner-doubtless there are mysteries in these which man cannot yet fathom; and questions may be asked which we are, as yet, unable to answer. The counsels of the Lord are, in many cases, too deep and too far reaching for our full comprehension. If so, it is at least idle for us to presume to sit in judgment upon them, or to try to alter, or evade, whatever he reveals concerning them. We may greatly err in so doing. We may do immense mischief to our own souls, and to the souls of our fellow-men. We may greatly dishonor God.

Probably, also, many things are dark to us at present, not because of our want of intellectual capacity, but because of our brief experience. Time has been wanting to unfold the scheme sufficiently to our comprehension. Wait till the day reveals it; and, if it be best, what we know not now we may know hereafter; and perhaps what is now dark shall then disclose brighter glories than we are as yet able to imagine.

The Apostle Peter calls us to the consideration of this value of time, in forming our judgment of the Divine providences. On the delay of threatened judgments there come scoffers, saying, "Where is the promise of his coming? For, since the fathers fell asleep, all things continue as they were from the beginning of the creation." They forget how the old world perished in the deluge. They do not believe that the same heavens and the earth are kept in store, reserved unto fire against the day of judgment and perdition of ungodly men. On the other hand, the people of God, looking to the completion of some promised scheme of glory and beneficence, and seeing the wicked long triumphant, and the righteous suffering long affliction, sometimes give way to impatience, and cry, "How long, O Lord, how long?" But the delay, either of judgment or of promised blessings, is no evidence of slackness on the part of God. Often he delays judgment because he is long-suffering, not willing that any should perish, but that all should come to repentance. If judgment had always been speedily executed, how many who are now saved would have been lost? Had Saul of Tarsus been cut down while breathing out threatenings and slaughter against the church, it would have been just: but what a revenue of praise and glory to God,-what songs of salvation over all the earth and

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