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the ranks, and the service of this regiment was thus more hazardous than that of any other. Its loss was likewise great. The centinels were perpetually surprised upon their posts by the Indians, and, what was most astonishing, they were borne off their stations without communicating any alarm, or being heard of after.

Not a trace was left of the manner in which they had been conveyed away, except that, upon one or two occasions, a few drops of blood had appeared upon the leaves which covered the ground. Many imputed this unaccountable disappearance to treachery, and suggested as an unanswerable argument, that the men thus surprised might at least have fired their muskets, and communicated the alarm to the contiguous posts. Others, however, who could not be brought to consider it as treachery, were content to receive it as a mystery which time would explain.

One morning, the centinels having been stationed as usual over night, the guard went at sunrise to relieve a post which extended a considerable distance into the wood. The centinel was gone! The surprise was great; but the circumstance had occurred before. They left another man, and departed, wishing him better luck. “ You need not be afraid," said the man with warmth," I shall not desert."

The relief-company returned to the guard-house.

The centinels were replaced every four hours, and, at the appointed time, the guard again marched to relieve the post. To their inexpressible astonishment the man was gone! They searched round the post, but no traces could be found of his disappearance. It was necessary that the station, from a stronger motive than ever, should not remain unoccupied ; they were compelled to leave another man, and returned ruminating upon this strange circumstance, to the guard-house. The superstition of the soldiers was awakened, and the terror ran through the regiment. The Colonel being apprised of the occurrence, signified his intention to accompany the guard when they relieved the centinel they had left. At the appointed time, they all marched together; and again, to their unutterable wonder, they found the post vacant, and the man

gone!

Under these circumstances, the Colonel hesitated whether he should station a whole company here, or whether he should again submit the post to a single centinel. The cause of these repeated disappearances of men, whose courage and honesty were never suspected, must be discovered; and it seemed not likely that this discovery could be obtained by persisting in the old method. Three brave men were now lost to the regiment,

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y eye more constantly fixed upon it, and as it was now witha few yards of the coppice, hesitated whether I should not e. My comrades, thought I, will laugh at me for alarming em by shooting a pig! I had almost resolved to let it alone, hen just as it approached the thicket, I thought I observed it ve an unusual spring. I no longer hesitated : I took my m; discharged my piece; and the animal was instantly retched before me with a groan which I conceived to be that a human creature. I went up to it, and judge my astonishent, when I found that I had killed an Indian! He had enloped himself with the skin of one of these wild hogs so artfuland completely ; his hands and feet were so entirely conceali in it, and his gait and appearance were so exactly corresponent to that of the animal's, that, imperfectly as they were alays seen through the trees and jungles, the disguise could not e penetrated at a distance, and scarcely discovered upon the earest aspect. He was armed with a dagger and a tomaawk.”

Such was the substance of this man's relation. The cause f the disappearance of the other centinels was now apparent. the Indians, sheltered in this disguise, secreted themselves in ne coppice; watched the moment when they could throw it ff'; burst upon the centinels without previous alarm, and, too uick to give them an opportunity to discharge their piece, ither stabbed or scalped them, and bore their bodies away, thich they concealed at some distance in the leaves. The Imericans gave them rewards for every scalp of an enemy vhich they brought. Whatever circumstances of wonder may appear in the present relation, there are many now alive who an attest its authenticity,

ESCAPE OF MRS. SPENCER SMITH.

In 1806, the French force, under General Lauriston, entered Venice, and established there a new government.

Mrs. Spencer Smith, the sister-in-law of the gallant Sir Sidney Smith, was then resident there, for the benefit of her health, with two infant children.

She received an order to appear before the French police. On obeying the summons, she was declared to be under arrest as a French prisoner, and received an order to depart within a week, for the city of Bassano, the place fixed upon by the government for her residence. She demanded to know the reason for which she was thus treated ; and was answered, Your country and A

very few days after, it appeared that the order to repair to Bassano was a mere feint, and that the real instructions of

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and to assign the post to a fourth, seemed nothing less than giving him up to destruction. The poor fellow, whose turn it was to take the station, though a man in other respects of incomparable resolution, trembled from head to foot. " I must do my duty," said he to the officer," I know that; but I should like to lose my life with more credit.”

“I will leave no man,” said the Colonel, “ against his will." A man immediately stept from the ranks, and desired to take the post. Every mouth commended his resolution. "I will not be taken alive," said he," and you shall hear of me on the least alarm. At all events, I will fire my piece if I hear the least noise. If a crow chatters, or a leaf falls, you shall hear my muşket. You may be alarmed when nothing is the matter; but you must take the chance of that as the condition of my making the discovery."

The Colonel applauded his courage, and told him he would be right to fire upon the least noise which was ambiguous. His comrades shook hands with him, and left him with a melancholy foreboding. The company marched back, and waited the event in the guard-house with the most anxious curiosity.

An hour had elapsed, and every ear was upon the rack for the discharge of the musket, when, upon a sudden, the report was heard. The guard immediately marched, accompanied, as before, by the Colonel, and some of the most experienced officers of the regiment. As they approached the post, they saw the man advancing towards them, dragging another man on the ground by the hair of his head. When they came up to him, it appeared to be an Indian whom he had shot. An explanation was immediately required. “I told your honour," said the man,

" that I should fire if I heard the least noise. The resolution I had taken has saved my life, and led to the discovery. I had not been long on my post, when I heard a rustling at some short distance; I looked and saw an American hog, such as are common in the woods, crawling along the ground, and seemingly looking for nuts under the trees and amongst the leaves. As these animals are so very common, I ceased to consider it for some minutes ; but being on the constant alarm and expectation of attack, and scarcely knowing what was to be considered a real cause of apprehension, or what was not, I kept my eyes vigilantly fixed upon it, and marked its progress among the trees; still there was no need to give the alarm, and my thoughts were, notwithstanding, directed to danger from another quarter. It struck me, however, as somewhat singular, to see this animal making, by a circuitous passage, for a thick coppice immediately behind my post. I therefore kept my eye more constantly fixed upon it, and as it was now within a few yards of the coppice, hesitated whether I should not fire. My comrades, thought I, will laugh at me for alarming them by shooting a pig! I had almost resolved to let it alone, when just as it approached the thicket, I thought I observed it give an unusual spring. I no longer hesitated : I took my aim; discharged my piece; and the animal was instantly stretched before me with a groan which I conceived to be that of a human creature. I went up to it, and judge my astonishment, when I found that I had killed an Indian !

He had enveloped himself with the skin of one of these wild hogs so artfully and completely ; his hands and feet were so entirely concealed in it, and his gait and appearance were so exactly correspondent to that of the animal's, that, imperfectly as they were always seen through the trees and jungles, the disguise could not be penetrated at a distance, and scarcely discovered

the nearest aspect. He was armed with a dagger and a tomahawk."

Such was the substance of this man's relation. The cause of the disappearance of the other centinels was now apparent. The Indians, sheltered in this disguise, secreted themselves in the coppice; watched the moment when they could throw it off; burst upon the centinels without previous alarm, and, too quick to give them an opportunity to discharge their piece, either stabbed or scalped them, and bore their bodies away, which they concealed at some distance in the leaves. The Americans gave them rewards for every scalp of an enemy which they brought. Whatever circumstances of wonder may appear in the present relation, there are many now alive who can attest its authenticity.

upon

ESCAPE OF MRS. SPENCER SMITH.

In 1806, the French force, under General Lauriston, entered Venice, and established there a new government. Mrs. Spencer Smith, the sister-in-law of the gallant Sir Sidney Smith, was then resident there, for the benefit of her health, with two infant children.

She received an order to appear before the French police. On obeying the summons, she was declared to be under arrest as a French prisoner, and received an order to depart within a week, for the city of Bassano, the place fixed upon by the government for her residence. She demanded to know the reason for which she was thus treated ; and was answered, " Your country and your name.A

very few days after, it appeared that the order to repair to Bassano was a mere feint, and that the real instructions of.

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