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Who by that search shall wiser grow?
By that, ourselves we never know.
The little knowledge I have gain'd,
Was all from simple NATURE drain'd;
Hence my life’s maxims took their rise,
Hence grew my settled hate to vice.

The daily labours of the bee
Awake my soul to industry.
Who can observe the careful ant,
And not provide for future want?
My dog, (the trustiest of its kind)
With gratitude inflames my mind :
I mark his true, bis faithful way,
And in my service copy Tray.
In constancy and nuptial love,
I learn my duty from the dove :
The hen, who from the chilly air,
With pious wing protects her care,
And every fowl that flies at large,
Instruct me in a pa ent's charge.

« From NATURE too I take my rule,
To sbun contempt and ridicule.
I never, with important air,
In conversation overbear.
Can

grave and formal pass for wise,
When men the solemn owl despise ?
My tongue within my lips I rein;
For who talks much must talk in vain.
We from the wordy torrent fly,
Who listens to the chattering pye?
Nor would I, with felonious flight,
By stealth invade my neighbour's right
Rapacious animals we hate;
Kites, hawks, and wolves, deserve their fate.
Do not we just abhorrence find
Against the toad and serpent kind ?
But Envy, Calumny, and Spite,
Bear stronger venom in their bite.

Thus every ohject of creution
Can furnish hints to Contemplation ;
And, from the most minute and mean,
A virtuous mind can morals glean..

“ Thy fame is just,” the Sage replies ;
“ Thy virtue proves thee truly wise.
Pride often guides the author's pen,
Booke as affected are as men:
But HE WHO STUDIES NATURE'S LAWS,
FROM CERTAIN TRUTH HIS MAXIMS DRAWS.”

GAY.

ON HEARING THE THRUSH FOR THE FIRST

TIME IN THE SEASOV, Feb. 15th, 1814.
DELIGHTFUL songster! pleas’d, I hear

Thy song harmonious swell;
Though & unconfirm'd the trembling year,
Thy welcome notes my spirits clieer:

I love thy music well.
Although no leaves adorn the trees,
Vor soft and gently fanning breeze
Play o'er the daisied meadows, wļiere
At summer eve the swains repair,
In healthful sport an hour to spend,
Ere the bright glowing sun descend:
Yet conscious of returning spring
Thou tun'st thy little throat to sing ;
Cheerful, if but the rising day
One crimson blush above display,
Tho' glittering dew-drope deck each spray.
Sweet bird! sing ort, the fields shall soon

Their robes of glory wear ;
While 'neath the blaze of summer noon
The woods all

gay appear.
Then with thy faithful mate retire

To some sequester’d glen:
Sweetest amid the tuneful choir,
There let thy cheering lays inspire
With LOVE the hearts of men.

VIGIL OBSERVATOR.

?

NOTES TO CORRESPONDENTS. The Cottager's Fireside The Twa Ploughmen-Hints on the Morals of the Peasantry- The Onod News-How to make a good Wife - Perseverance and Obstinacy and Poetical Pieces, including the Acrostic by Silyab- Juvenile Amusements, &c. by A. A.-and the communication by A. B. are received.

Mrs MASON's three Rules for making a good Servant, will be found in page 135 of our first volume.

We certainly give Siiyab credit for his good intentions and the jxdicious selection of his pieces, but are sorry we cannot insert any of those yet sent us, for reasons, that, we have no doubt, would prove satisfactory to himself, did he give us an opportunity of communicat. ing them to him personally, by sending us his address,

HADDINGTON; Printed and Published, MONTHLY, by G, MILLER & SON.

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BEING A CONTINUATION OF THE HISTORY OF AN IRISH FAMILY.

IOW Hammel and George conducted themselves in Edinburgh...

A noble sentiment... True magnanimity... A disagreeable shopmate in a gentleman's son ill brought up ...A more agreeable companion in the son of a poor widow ...A good servant meets with attention from an old mis. tress... The first interview between George's master and Waliam Gray... The fatherless boy is taken into the shop ...Badly used by Ned R.... The defects of genius supplied by persevering attention... Hammel delivers his message to his uncle... Their dialogue in consequence... George takes up the narrative... Informs his uncle how he and his brother first attracted notice... The manner in which they spent the evenings... Advantages of reading... Hammel's master makes an unexpected appearance ...Lewis expresses his satisfaction at the recital... The advantage of a well regulated mind... Of a taste for literature, and the benefits to be derived from well chosen circulating libraries...The duty of parents to cultivate a taste for reading in their children, and to encour

age publications adapted for youth, &c. WHEN We found ourselves in a strange place,” said Hammel, “it was a great comfort that we always met

Vol. II,

at

at night, and could advise and comfort each other. " seldom went to bed, or separated to our several work-shop in the morning, without speaking to each other of you parting advice, and resolving neither to say or do an thing we would be unwilling to lay before you in all the minutest circumstances.”

“Well, my dear Hammel, you could not submit you conduct to a more partial judge, and this account will nee diminish the interest I feel in you both. Many anxior: moments have I passed during the first six months you spent in town. Hardship I knew must be the lot of all in your situation, but I relied upon your manly spirit for sustaining disagreeables without flinching. My solicitude was not for what you might suffer, but how you shouls

act."

“ We had some hardships," said Hammel; “but we did not forget you had often told us, that THE NOBLEST USE OF COURAGE IS IN DOING OUR DUTY AGAINST ALL OBSTACLES AND DISCOUR. JGEMENTS, AND TO BEAR PAINFUL EX ERTION OR INCONVENIENCE WITH CHEER FUL FORTITUDE."

“ That is indeed truer valour,” said Lewis, "than to pos sess strength, agility, and ferocity, to engage and overcome all the lads in your shop. Any strong animal, a madman i bull, or a mastiff, may conquer his inferior in' bodily prowess; but to persevere in the endurance of lengthened discomfort, and to abstain from employing any ignoble means for relief, is the magnanimity of a rational being.”

“ Hammel never had to defend himself,” said George " but he once took my part against a tall fellow, who, be cause he was four years older, and had been born a gentle man, thought I should not only run when he pleased in the shop, but spend the after hours as he chose ; and that was in card-playing in a gin shop; two snares you warned me to shun."

Poor young man,” said Hammel, “ he was born gentleman, but did not receive a gentleman's education for I lrave reasou to say, that really well instructed gen

had

tlemen

son

tlemen have a generous way of thinking, and a gentleness n their manners that sets all about them at ease; but this young man was the of

very
foolish
parents, who

squan. dered their fortune and their precious time in amusements, leaving three sons under the care of a worthless tutor, whom they had chosen chiefly because he made a genteel bow, and dressed handsomely. When Mr R. and ais lady were from home, the tutor paid visits also, and left the boys to play about the stables. Their father died insolvent; their mother is married again ; and the boys taken up by relations. George's master was a distant cousin, and he would have been very fortunate had le con. ducted himself properly, for Mr B. is a liberal man, and has no near heirs; but Edward R. though a very clever lad, gave no application, and among the stable-boys he had contracted such a passion for cards, as ended in his ruin. He ran deeply in debt, and as he had no prospect of paying, entered himself a volunteer with a man-of-war's tender at Leith. George suffered much from him, but be behaved worse to a poor youth who was certainly not his equal in birth or talents, but he had sound principles and prudence, and, if he lives, has now much better prospects than Ned R.”

- Does he owe his good fortune to any incident," saill Lewis, " or is it self-earned ?"

He owes it all to himself, sir," said Hammel, " and to a worthy mother. She was left a young widow with five children, who could hardly take any care of each other they were so young.

What was to be done to maintain them? Their father had come from a distant country as a labourer, having been reduced to poverty by the failure of his crops and loss of cattle. Their mother had served a lady in town four years, and had left her to to take care of her own mother, who lived near her husband's parents : but many years had elapsed since she had heard of her late mistress. She was conscious of having deserved a blameless character for honesty and diligence, and knew the lady to be so actively benevolent, that if she could find her out, some employment might be devised for her. She applied to the medical gentleman who with

great

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