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THE

LITERARY GAZETTE;

AND

JOURNAL

OF

Belles Lettres, Arts, Sciences, etc.

FOR THE YEAR

1819.

COMPRISING

ORIGINAL ESSAYS ON POLITE LITERATURE, THE ARTS AND SCIENCES ;

A REVIEW OF NEW PUBLICATIONS; .

POETRY ; CRITICISMS ON THE FINE ARTS, THE DRAMA, &c.

Biography;
CORRESPONDENCE OF DISTINGUISHED PERSONS;

ANECDOTES, JEUX D'ESPRIT, &c.

SKETCHES OF SOCIETY AND MANNERS;

PROCEEDINGS OF PUBLIC AND LITERARY SOCIETIES;

POLITICAL SUMMARY, LITERARY INTELLIGENCE, &c. &c.

LONDON:

PRINTED BY WILLIAM POPLE,

No. 67, Chancery Lane.

PUBLISHED FOR THE PROPRIETORS, AT THE LITERARY GAZETTE OFFICE, STRAND

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Journal of Belles Lettres, Arts, Sciences, etc.

AND

This Journal is supplied Weekly, or Monthly, by the principal Booksellers and Newsmen throughout the Kingdom, but to those who may desire

its immediate transinission, by post, we beg to recommend the LITERARY GAZETTE, printed on stamped paper, price One Shilling. No. 102.

PRICE 8d.

SATURDAY, JÁNUARY 2, 1819.

to the title of our papers, as we have been honoured by a pretty close imitation.

pp. 67.

pp. 58.

ADDRESS.

a hope, in the language of a very beg those who desire to complete their sets,

agreeable writer,* that “ to the lovers that they will lose no time in transmitting On the commencement of a new of literature, these volumes, when they their orders to their respective newsmen or : Volume, when from past success we have outlived their year, may not be un- booksellers, to prevent disappointment. may presume to anticipate a large addi

important, but rather constitute a great Persons residing in the country are requested to give tion of subscribers, it may be expedient portion of literary history, and be indeed their orders to any newsman or bookseller in their own to take a brief view of the origin and the annals of the republic.”. objects of this Publication, and of the means employed to render it worthy of able friends for their liberal aid, and the

Most affectionately thanking our many the gratifying reception which it has public generally for their cheering en REVIEW OF NEW BOOKS. experienced. Novel in its plan, and consequently experimental in its nature, mend the Literary Gazette, and what we Memoir on the Ruins of_Babylon. By

couragement of our labours, we comit is delightful for us to be able to state have stated, to the consideration of those that the kindness of its infant reception who may not yet have become acquainted

Claudius James Rich, Esq. Resident seems to have grown into rooted favour with the objects of this undertaking, and

for the Hon. East India Company at as it has developed its character, and particularly to the lovers of literature and

the Court of the Pasha of Bagdat. that, as it becomes better known, it the arts, as a medium of much conse

Third Edition. London, 1818. 8vo. spreads itself over the distant parts of its native land, the colonies and foreign abroad. We beg also to request attention

sequence to their interests at home and Second Memoir, &c. By the Same. countries, with a rapidity equal to the to the annexed notices, which appear when the first edition of the former of most-sanguine expectations of its con

requisite on the present occasion. ductors.

these works was published three or four The Literary Gazette, during the pe

The Literary GAZETTE is regu- its contents. The study of antiquities

years ago, we were highly pleased with riod of two years, has given copious re

larly published every SATURDAY MORNING, views of about four hundred new works,

on stamped paper, price ls, and sent FREE OF and antiquarian researches has been with extracts, so as to enable the public postage throughout the kingdom, so that too often with justice called dry; and to form a fair judgment upon each. it may be received in the country on Sunday yet when the object is worthy of a painAbove fifty original biographical memoirs at the distance of nearly 200 miles from ful examination, when not only curiosity of distinguished persons, who have died town. It may also be forwardled like a neus- is gratified; hut results important to the in that time, have also appeared in its paper, to friends and relations abrond, on history of mankind, and even to the columns; and no notice of consequence application to the GENERAL Post-Office, illustration of divine truths, are to be to the fine arts or to science has been LONDON, or to any Local Postmaster.

Under the title of The London LITERARY gathered, as the reward of such labours, omitted. In Foreign literature and in- Gazette, the same work is also published on it is not in the nature of things that such teresting communications from Corre- unstamped paper, price only 8d. for the par- a subject, rightly investigated, can be pondents abroad, it has, we may con ticular advantage of those who reside in either tedious or unentertaining. For fidently assert, surpassed any contempo- London and its vicinity; but ite beg to re these volumes we can truly vouch that rary or preceding miscellany: it has also mind our country friends, that these cight they are altogether the reverse. Babyreceived and printed a multitude of con- penny unstamped Numbers may also be re; lon attracts us by the very sound of its tributions from some of the first native gularly, had (if ordered), of, the principal name, and all that is stupendous in the scholars, poets, philosophers, and other booksellers throughout all the towns celebrated men now living.

kingdom; and it is only in the more remote productions of human power, all that is

situations, and where it is an object to receive venerable from age, all that is wonderDetermined to pursue the same career it more instantaneously thun through the ful for art and ingenuity, all that is inteof diligence and impartiality which has medium of the booksellers' weekly parcels, resting from the association of ideas, already been so unprecedently rewarded, that we recommend the stamped 1s. Numbers seem to be concentrated in an inquiry we may venture to promise that our The Literary Gazette is also collected embracing that mighty city, its ancient future Numbers will deserve the cha- and stitched up in QUARTERLY PARTS, prodigies and modern ruins. racter of affording a various and com- price 10s. each, for the convenience of ex The first Memoir was originally pubprehensive view of the manners, amuse- portation, and of those who have only occa- lished in an excellent Journal, conducted ments, learning, science, and improve-sional opportunities of receiving it.

Lastly—THE VOLUMES for EACH tled The Mines of the East, (Mines

by Mr. Hammer, at Vienna, and entiments of the times. To this effect the numerous interesting and instructive pro- be had complete with titles, indexes, &c. price

YEAR, from the commencement in 1817,

may de l'Orient); and it will be necessary ductions, issuing so incessantly from the 21.28. each, forming together an authentic for us to take a concise view of its most press, must mainly contribute, and we and valuable register for constan! re

memorable facts, and of the theory it klaim no merit but that of bringing them ference.

maintains, before we proceed to the immediately and prominently under The Volume for 1818 is now ready for analysis of its successor. Mr. Rich's republic cognizance. In fine, following delivery --All the Quarterly Parts, ex- sidence at Bagdat, afforded him the best is far as our abilities permit

, the foot- cept the First, may also be had separately at of opportunities to explore the site of steps of Bayle, who declared himself present, as well as most of the Numbers, the Capital of the Assyrian Empire, now to be a reporter, and not a judge, stamped or unstamped, and we earnestly

so lost amid the wreck of years, that We trust we may modestly express

even the place of its existence is a ques VOL, III.

* D'Isracli.

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