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PARKINS & COTTO,

24 & 25, OXFORD STREET, LONDON.

PHOTOGRAPHIC ALBUMS.

A very handsome one for 30 Portraits, bound in real morocco, with two gilt clasps, 10s. 6d.

Ditto for 50 Portraits, 12s.6d., sent POST FREE upon receipt of a Post-office Order. DRESSING BAGS FROM 31s. 6D. TO TWENTY GUINEAS,

DRESSING CASES FROM 21s. TO FIFTY GUINEAS. RETICULES SCENT CASES | WORK BOXES SCRAP BOOKS

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SCENT BOTTLES
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TEA CADDIES
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KEY BOXES | WRITING CASES · DITTO, for GENTLEMEN

ORTEMONNAIBS

for LADIES NTLEMEN

SLACKS SILVER ELECTRO PLATE

IS A STRONG COATING OF PURE SILVER OVER NICKEL, MANUFACTURED SOLELY BY RICHARD AND JOHN SLACK. The fact of Twenty Years' wear is amplo proof of its durability, and in the hardest use it can never show the brusy

under surface so much complained of by many purchasers of Electro-plate.

EVERY ARTICLE FOR THE TABLE AS IN SILVER.
OLD GOODS REPLATED EQUAL TO NEW.

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SLACK'S TABLE CUTLERY.
Messrs. SLACK have been celebrated 50 years for the superior manufacture of their Cutlery.
IVORY TABLE KNIVES, 168., 20s., 288. DESSERT, 11s., 148., 15s.6d. Per Dozex.

Best Quality, Warranted not to come loose in the handles.

ORDERS CARRIAGE FREE PER RAIL SLACK'S CATALOGUE, with 350 drawings and prices, gratis or post free. No Person

should furnish without one.

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Ladies having Schools to employ
Supplied with all the Laces, Works, Linen, Long-cloth, &c.

necessary for the “Trousseau." Lace Collars and Sleeves, Cambric Handkerchiefs. MARRIAGE OUTFITS COMPLETE.

White Dressing Gowns, 1 Guinea;

Cotton Hosiery, 2s. 6d.;
Patent Corsets, 16s. 6d.

Real Balbriggan Hosiery.
THIS PART OF THE BUSINESS UNDER THE

MANAGEMENT OF MRS. TAYLOR.

LADIES RIDING TROUSERS,

Chamois Leather, with Black Feet.

Waterproof Riding Talma, 1} Guinea,
Young Gentlemen's Superfine Cloth Jackets, 35s.

School ditto, 258,
Young Gentlemen's Shirts, 5s. 60.
Naval Cadets' Outfits, complete.

RIDING HABITS, 51 TO 81 GUINEAS.

Lindsey Riding Habits

for little girls,
2 Guineas.

Everything of the Superior Excellence for which the House has been

Celebrated for Thirty Years.

53, BAKER STREET.
W. G. TA Y LO R.

MACMILLAN'S MAGAZINE.

- MARCH, 1862.

UNIVERSAL INFORMATION AND “ THE ENGLISH CYCLOPÆDIA.”

BY THE EDITOR.

The time was when every man whose them, it does not appear that, in any business lay in intellectual matters was article of erudition, they could be taxed bound to be his own encyclopædia. with ignorance, or with knowledge under Having picked up, one way or another, the highest contemporary mark. Later the amount of knowledge which he re- still, the alleged necessity of something quired, he walked about, carrying this like universal learning, each one for stock with him, increasing it as means himself, among those whom nations offered, and serving as a source of infor- would recognise as their intellectual mation to which others could refer that chiefs, was not palpably opposed to the chanced to be in his neighbourhood. fact. When Plato philosophized, it was Nor, in those days, did the knowledge not the mere flight of a splendid specuof a man so situated necessarily fall far lative faculty in empty space, but the short of all the knowledge that was to action of a mind that had grasped and be obtained. The world was yet young; digested all accessible knowledge respectand, as all that we call learning or eru ing the whole world of matter and men dition really resolves itself into history round which it flew and whose sublimer

-into a recollection of what has hap- relations it sought to establish. In pened among men, or men have thought Aristotle, even more conspicuously, we and found out the burden of legends behold, with wonder unabated to this that had been rolled down from the begin- day, universality and minuteness of ning of things in any one land was not acquisition, combined, as a matter of too great for one man's memory. Homer, course, with the spirit of philosophic if there was such a person, was not only system. the poet of the Greek world, but also a Nor did the tradition which required walking compendium, from one Greek universality of knowledge in those who "storefarm” to another, of all the history would tower highest in a community, as and science then existing on both sides its men of intellect, die out with the of the Ægean. Herodotus carried in his Greeks. Different ages and countries single head a recollection, most diligently have had different notions as to the kind got together, of all that it seemed worth of intellectual functionary most to be while for a Greek to know respecting the held in honour. Over large tracts of present and the past of mankind as time, as with us perhaps now, the poet ranged round and away from the vast has had the undisputed pre-eminence, margin of the Mediterranean. What and been voted, nem. con., the tip-top of with the strong memories of those old created beings; but there have been worthies, what with the small helps of times when—possibly because a poet of tablets, note-books, and scrolls, which the right order seemed a blessing past the later of them may have had about praying for-men have been content to. No. 29.-VOL. V.

BB

offer their highest worship to the philo- perfection, and act on the nerves of a sopher, or even, at a pinch, to such a crowd like an electric battery. A generatortoise or toad of earth as the scholar ortion or two later, as we see from the Diahistorian. The Romans, in this respect, logue of Tacitus concerning Eloquence, it made a rather characteristic choice. For had begun to be a question among the cula time, at least, it was neither poet, phi- tivated Romans whether after all oratory losopher, nor historian that the imperial was the grandest of human occupations, people honoured the most and hoisted and whether it might not be more judion their shoulders with the loudest cious for a man of intellect to retire into shouts, but that nondescript compound the country, and there, if he would work of the practical parts of all three to whom with his brains, work in quiet, and merely they gave the name of orator. But then “sing to the praise and glory of God," what a prodigy their orator had to be, to like the parish-clerk in Lincolnshire, “a satisfy them! According to Cicero, for little ’ymn of his own composin'.” But, one real orator that was produced, Nature wheresoever and in whatsoever one were produced poets, philosophers, and his- to work, it was required of every man torians, nay generals and statesmen also, who would be an intellectual chief among by the bushel ; and what he meant by his fellows, that he should be master of making this assertion, over and above the universal learning of his time. the sly reference he may have had to The same tradition, with the same No. 1, we see better when we read his evidence of facts at first sight to make inventory of the things necessary for the it plausible, has descended even into outfit of a first-class orator. We flatter the modern world. In the early ourselves that we have orators among centuries of our era there were men in us; but how our House-of-Commons the monasteries or about the Courts of men would stare if this enumeration of Europe-take our own Bede, or the Cicero's were made imperative! First of Alcuin whom we lent to Charlemagne, all, universal knowledge—not the smat for example—who, according to the tering on many subjects which pleaders rude standard of the age, were prodigies must acquire in handling their successive of universal lore and made it subserve briefs, but real well-grounded knowledge theology. Then, on the first establishin every possible department of science, ment of the great European Universities, art, and practice. The orator must know their luminaries—the Abelards, the as much of philosophy as the philoso- Aquinases, and others of those princes pher, as much of history as the historian, of the schools who lectured to their as much of war as the general, as much thousands of pupils—were men who, of law as the jurist, as much of business though their business was logic and as the merchant, and so on! Then, in speculation, would not have stood their addition to this, and to vitalize all this ground in the midst of such packs of heap of acquisitions, there must be hungry students clamant for knowledge the whole set of the orator's special unless they had been living reservoirs qualifications besides the voice, the of the totum scibile. And what of the presence, the energy, the training in first great poet in any of the European rhetoric, the action, action, action. In vernaculars? Is it not part of the other words, it was upon the orator greatness of Dante that, even in a poem rather than upon any other man that the which is unique among the productions Romans of this age laid that awful ne- of genius as the expression of one excessity of being his own encyclopædia traordinary personality, he presents to us which the Greeks had laid rather upon in summary the entire system of thought their poets and philosophers—with this and knowledge of medieval Italy? A farther demand, that the orator had to while after Dante it was when, in conbe an encyclopædia beautifully bound, sequence of the so-called Revival of that could stand on its legs at a mo- Letters, Scholarship or Learning in a ment's notice, gesticulate and speak to special sense of the word-more particu

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