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ment. Here the part he took in sug which tends rapidly to accomplish that great gesting and bringing about the Great end to which, indeed, all history points; the Exhibition of the Works of Industry unity which breaks down the limits, and levels

realization of the Unity of mankind! Not a of all Nations, gives him a title even to the peculiar characteristics of the different originality and to the chief invention nations of the earth, but rather a unity, the of a method of international education

result and product of those very national vathe developments of which are not yet

rieties and antagonistic qualities." exhausted; and, on the whole, he did At the Dinner of the Royal Academy, May 3, 80 much and did it so well that we now

1851 :—“Gentlemen ! the production of all

works in art or poetry requires in their concepthink of him not as the foreign Prince

tion and execution not only an exercise of the who came among us two and twenty intellect, skill, and patience, but particularly a years ago, but as naturalized Briton concurrent warmth of feeling and a free flow who understood us and our ways, had

of imagioation. l'his renders them most made our interests his own, and so con

tender plants, which will thrive only in an

atmosphere calculated to maintain that ducted himself as to win honour for warmth; and that atmosphere is one of kind. himself and confer additional dignity on ness, kindness towards the artist personally our Queen.

as well as towards his production. An un

kind word of criticism passes like a cold blast There is a melancholy interest now

over tbeir tender shoots, and shrivels them in turning over those printed speeches up, checking the flow of the sap, which was of Prince Albert on public occasions rising to produce perhaps multitudes of flowers which are as yet the only literary me

and fruit. But still criticism is absolutely morial of his activity. They are models

necessary to the development of art, and the

injudicious praise of an inferior work becomes of what such things, from such a speaker, an insult to superior gepius. In this respect ought to be-singularly neat and con onr times are peculiarly unfavourable when cise, always hitting the exact nail of compared with those when Madonnas were the occasion on the head, and generally

painted in the seclusion of convents; for we

have now on the one hand the eager compedistinguished not only by their practical tition of a vast array of artists of every degree good sense, but also, so far as that slight of talent and skill, and on the other as judge, and formal style of composition will per

a great public, for the greater part wholly unmit, by a vein of speculative meaning writers, who often strive to impress the public

educated in art, and thus led by professional not usual in British orations of the same with a great idea of their own artistic knoworder. Here are a few passages which ledge by the merciless manner in which they seem characteristic :

treat works which cost those who produced

them the bighest efforts of mind or feeling. At a meeting of the Society for Improving the The works of art, by being publicly exbibited Condition of the Labouring Classes, May 18, and offered for sale, are becoming articles of 1848:-“Depend upon it, the interests of trade, following as such the unreasoning laws classes too often contrasted are identical, and of markets and fashion; and public and even it is only ignorance which prevents them from private patronage is swayed by their tyran. uniting for each other's advantage. To dispel nical influence." that ignorance, to show how man can help

At the Banquet in Birmingham, on laying man, notwithstanding the complicated state of civilized society, ought to be the aim of every

the first stone of the Birmingham and Midland

Institute, November 22, 1855 :-" The study philanthropic person; but it is more peculiarly

of the laws by which the Almighty governs the duty of those who, under the blessing of

the Universe is therefore our bounden Divine Providence, enjoy station, wealth and

duty. education."

Of these laws our great academies

and seats of education have, rather artiAt the Lord Mayor's Banquet in London, trarily, selected only two spheres or group18 March 21, 1850, in anticipation of the Greal E. (as I may call them) as essential parts of our hibition : -"Gentlemen! I conceive it to be the national educ ion—the laws which regulate duty of every educated person closely to watch quantities and proportions, which form the and etuay the time in which he lives, and, as far subject of mathematics; and the laws reguas in hini lies, to add his humble mite of india lating the expression of our thoughts, through vidual exertion to further the accomplishinent the medium of language, that is to say, gramof what he believes Providence to have or mar, which finds its purest expression in the dained. Nobody, however, who has paid any classical languages. These laws are most imattention to the peculiar features of our pre portant branches of knowledge, their study sent era, will doubt for a moment that we are trains and elevates the mind, but they are not living at a period of most wonderful transition, the only ones; there are others, which we

cannot disregard, which we cannot do with as well as in State : I mean the principles of out. There are, for instance, the laws govern individual liberty, and of allegiance and subing the human mind, and its relation to the mission to the wil of the community, exacted by Divine Spirit (the subject of logic and meta it for its own preservation. These conflicting physics : there are those which govern our principles cannot safely be disregarded; they bodily nature and its connexion with the soul must be reconciled. To this country belongs (the subject of physiology and psychology); the honour of having succeeded iu this mighty those which govern human society, and the task, as far as the State is concerned, whilst relation between man and man (the saljects other nations are still wrestling with it.” of politics, jarisprudence, and political economs), azd many others. Whilst of the laws There is no reason to think but that, just mentioned some have been recognised as as these views are characteristically essentia . of education in different institutions, those which the Prince-Consort always and some will by the course of time more fully assert their right to recognition, the laws

urged in public, so the expression of regulating matter and form are those which

them, as here given, was his own too. will constitute the chief object of your pur. Matter and expression together, they suits; and, as the principle of subdivision of surely reveal, when we allow for the labour is the one most congenial to our age, I would advise you to keep to this speciality,

necessary straitness of all such oratory, and to follow with undivided attention chiefly

a mode of thought and feeling which the scie:ces of mechanics, physics, and che we can regard as princely in a rather mistry, and the fine arts in painting, sculpture, high sense of the word. No one among and archiecture."

our numerous aristocratic orators on o meeting of the Royal Agricultural public occasions thought and talked in Socieli nt York, July 13, 1848 :-“ Agricul. the same exact strain. It was distinture, which once

was the main pursuit of guishably the Prince-Consort's. Putting this as of every other nation, holds, even

the notion of his intellectual and moral now, notwithstanding the development of comúerce and manufactures, a fundamental qualities we so get along with others position in the realm. And, although time has derived from other sources, are we not changed the position which the owner of the entitled to think, that, had his life been land, with his feudal dependents, held in the e:11pire. the country gentlemeu with his wife

spared, a time might have possibly come and children, the country clergy man, the te.

-say in some conflict with the rest nint, and the labourer, still form a great and, of the world, rolling Britain back upon I hope, united family, in which we gladly herself, and evoking the full powers, rroguise the foundation of our social state.

without stint, of all who were capable Science and mechanical improvement have, in these days, changed the mere practice of culti

to represent her—when such a mind viting ihe soil into an industrial pursuit, would have been roused into more requiring capital, machinery, industry and powerful and direct action than had beskill, ani perseverance in the struggle of competition. This is another great change. but ire

fore been required of it, and would have must cosider it a great progress, as it demands

been watched as worthy of the emerhigher ex rts and a higher intelligence." gency? As it is, just as the year 1861

is drawing to a close in prospects cloudy All the ! rd Jubilee of the Society for the Pro enough, these prospects are complicated, pagation of the Gospel in Foreim Paris, June 111, 18.01: -“We cannot help deploring that the

and our spirits in meeting them un(hurch, whose exertions for the progress of

settled, by the calamity of his loss. He Christianity and civilization we are to-day ac is gone ; what he has been, ire know; huowl's ng, should be afflicted by internal dis

what he might have been, we know not. sension and attacks from without. I have no far, hs, arer, for her safety anil ultimate wel

His widowed Queen (whom God comfure, solo, as she holds fast to what our ances. fort) survives as our Sovereign, dearer tors gair... ' for us at the Reformation, the gospel to us because of her great sorrow ; and,

od the wafettered right of its use. The dissen. a generation hence, his children, whom rions aui üifficulties which we witness in this as in every other Church, arise from the natural

thrones and chances await, will look back and necessary conflict of the two antagonistic

to this then distant year, and think of their principle, which move human society in Church father prematurely lost to them!

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