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ALLEN H. WELD, A. M.,
AUTHOR OF LATIN LESSONS AND READER, AND AN ENGLISH GRAMMAR.

REVISED AND ADAPTED TO THE LATEST EDITION OF WELD'S

PROGRESSIVE GRAMMAR.

PORTLAND:

PUBLISHED BY SANBORN & CARTER,

EXCHANGE STREET.

18 6 0.

Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1859, by O. L. SANBORN, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of Maine.

SYNOPSIS OF GRAMMATICAL RELATIONS.

KG 10891

[graphic]

Grammatical Subject. Modifiers of the Gram. Subject.
The Grammatical Subject The Subject may be modified
of a sentence may be a noun by a noun in apposition; an ad-
or pronoun; a verb in the jective; a preposition with its ob-
infinitive; a clause; or the ject (adjunct); a participle; a verb
name of any sign or letter of in the infinitive; a clause; and
which anything can be af- sometimes an adverb.
firmed.
The subject, modified by one or more words, is called

the LOGICAL SUBJECT.

Grammatical Predicate. | Modifiers of the Gram. Predicate.

The Grammatical Predi The Grammatical Predicate may
cate of a sentence must be a be modified by a noun in the objec-
verb.

tive case (if the verb is transitive);
a verb in the infinitive; an adverb
a preposition with its object (ad-
junct); à clause; an adjective; a

phrase; and a quoted sentence.
The predicate, modified by one or more words, is called

the LOGICAL PREDICATE.

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MODIFICATION OF WORDS.

Noun, Pronoun.

Verb, Participle.
A noun may be modified

A verb may be modified
1. By a noun in apposition ; as, 1. By a noun in the objective case,
George, the king.

‘if the verb is transitive; as,
2. By an adjective; as, A tall mast. The sun gives light.
3. By an adjunct; as, A life of toil. 2. By a verb in the infinitive; as,
4. By a participle; as, The sun rising. He hopes to return.
5. By a clause; as, I, who speak to 8. By an adjunct; as, I walk in

you.
6. By an adverb; as, Not my feet | 4. By a clause; as, I hope that
only.

you are well.
7. By a verb in the infinitive; as, A 5. By an adverb; as, The wind
time to die.

blows violently. 8. By a noun in the possessive case; 6. By a phrase; as, In vain he laas, Lot's wife.

bors. A pronoun may be modified by all 7. By a quoted sentence; as,

the above except the last two. Bion said, “ Know thyself."

Adjective. An adjective may be

modified
1. By an adverb; as, Very

rich.
2. By a verb in the infini-

tive; as, Pleasant to

behold.
3. By an adjunct; as, True

to nature.
4. By another adjective

as, Bright red. 5. By a phrase; as, In gen

eral successful.

the grove.

Adverb. An adverb may be modified 1. By another adverb; as, Most

assuredly.
2. By an adjunct; as, Agree-

ably to nature, most of
all.

Preposition.
A preposition may be modi.

fied
1. By an adverb; as, Far be-

yond.
2. By a noun in the objective

case; as, Over the hills. 3. By a verb in the infinitive;

as, About to depart.

Classification of Sentences.

Clauses, &c.

To analyze a sentence, 1. Declarative; as, I write.

Simple as well as compound sentences Mention
2. Interrogative ; as, Do you write ? may contain Clauses, Phrases, and Adjuncts. 1. Its class.
3. Imperative; as, Write better.

Clauses are distinguished as Substantive, 2. Its logical and grammatical subject.
4. Exclamatory; as, How fast he writes ! Relative, Adjective, Adverbial, and Condi- 3. Its logical and grammatical predicate.
A Simple Sentence contains but one mem tional.

4. Its copula and attribute.
ber.

The name of an object addressed with its 5. Its clauses, when it has any, and the lead.
A Compound Sentence is made up of two modifying words, being unconnected with ing proposition they modify:
or more members, sometimes joined by a anything else in construction, constitutes 6. The component parts of the clauses, and
connecting word and sometimes not. what is called an independent expression; the office of each.
as, Stop, my good friend,

7. The adjuncts and phrases; what they

modify, and by what they are modified.

UNIVERS;I Y
LIBRARY
04 7*.172
PREFACE.

The selections which compose the body of the following work are so arranged as to constitute a gradual course of Exercises in Analyzing and Parsing.

The Rules of Syntax are taken from Weld's ENGLISH GRAMMAR by permission of the Publishers, and to these rules references are occasionally made, to assist the learner in explaining idiomatic or difficult passages.

As the extracts are from some of the most accomplished and approved writers, the Ornaments of style, Figures of Rhetoric, and Scanning, may be profitably attended to by advanced classes.

The book may be used by learners in almost any stage of attainment after the elementary principles of Grammar are understood. The work is designed to take the place of Pope's Essay, Thomson's Seasons, Young's Night Thoughts, and other entire poems, which are used as parsing books in Schools. A variety in the selections, it is believed, will be more profitable and interesting to the learner than any single work can be, which exhibits no gradation in style, and the peculiarities of one writer only.

A. H. W.

This Parsing Book has been revised by the Editor of Weld's Grammar, and in its preliminary system of analysis and course of syntax made to conform to the latest edition of the work just referred to. For the sake of greater variety, a number of new extracts have been introduced.

PARSING BOOK.

CHAPTER I.

ANALYSIS OF SENTENCES.

By the Analysis of Sentences is meant the process of resolving them into the parts of which they are composed.

The parts into which a sentence is analyzed, are called its Elements.

CLASSIFICATION OF SENTENCES. There are four kinds of sentences; Declarative, Interrogative, Imperative, and Exclamatory.

A Declarative Sentence is one in which something is declared; as, “ The sun shines."

An Interrogative Sentence is one in which a question is asked; as, “ Does the sun shine ?”

An Imperative Sentence is one that is used in commanding, entreating, or permitting; as, “Let the sun shine."

An Exclamatory Sentence is one used in exclaiming; as, "How pleasantly the sun shines ! ".

SUBJECT AND PREDICATE.

The Subject of a sentence is that about which something is said or written.

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