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A Monthly Magazine Devoted to the Promotion of True Culture.

Organ of the Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle.

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FARVAND COLLEGE

MAR 8 1934

LIBRARY

COPYRIGHTED BY THEODORE L. FLOOD, IN THE OFFICE OF THE LIBRARIAN OF CONGRESS,

ASHINGTON, D. C., 1883-4.

INDEX TO VOLUME IV.

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103, 606.

AGASSIZ. Prof. J. Tingley, Ph.D. 462. CHAUTAUQUA CHILDREN'S CLASS (1883). EDITOR'S OUTLOOK :

ALASKA-ITS MISSIONS. Rev. Wm. H. 62.

Negro, Dr. Haygood's Battle for. 115.

Lewis. 592.

CHAUTAUQUA FOR 1884. 543.

Père Hyacinthe. 241.

AMERICAN LITERATURE, Criticisms on.CHAUTAUQUA TO CALIFORNIA. Frances Phillips, Wendell. 429.

503.

Willard, Pres. W.C. T. U. 81.

Political Methods. 428.

AMERICAN LITERATURE, Selections From. CHAUTAUQUA WINTER, Echoes from a. Political Outlook, The. 115.

Aldrich, Thomas Bailey. 446.

Rev. H. H. Moore. 419.

Political Outlook, Present. 300,

Bancroft, George. 334.
CLASS OF '85, To the. 356.

Rewards of Public Service. 486.

Bryant, William Cullen. 208. CLIMATE SEEKING IN AMERICA. Geo. A. Shakspere Controversy, The. 53.

Bushnell, Dr. Horace. 145.

Townsend. 516.

Social Life, A Drawback to. 366.

Channing, William Ellery. 79. C. L. S. C. COURSE FOR 1884-'85. 600. Spanish Bull Fights. 301.
Dana, Richard Henry. 208. C. L. S. C. IN CANADA, The. 481.

Steam not an Aristocrat. 300.

Edwards, Jonathan. 16.

C. L. S. C. IN THE SOUTH. 292.

Temperance Question, The. 179.

Franklin, Benjamin. 77.
C. L. S. C. IN TORONTO, The. 167.

Tenth Assembly, The. 52.

Halleck, Fitz Greene. 207.

C. L. S. C. NOTES ON REQUIRED READ- Time Standards, The New. 240.

Higginson, Thomas Wentworth. 392. INGS.

Wall Street Troubles, The. 608.

Holmes, Oliver Wendell. 265.

October, 57

Workman, The Decline of Our. 547.

Howells, William D. 394.

November, 120.

Editor's TABLE. 56, 119.
Irving, Washington. 146.

December, 183.

EDUCATION OF NEGRO POPULATION. A.
James, Jr., Henry. 393.
January, 243.

G. Haygood. 148.
Jefferson, Thomas. 79.

February, 304.

ELECTRICITY. 89.
Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth. 210. March, 370.

ENGLISH, British and American. R. A.

Lowell, James Russell. 266.

April, 432.

Proctor. 410.

Mather, Cotton. 14.

May, 491.

ESTIVATION, or Summer Sleep. Rev. J.

Motley, John Lothrop. 333.

June, 551.

G. Wood, A.M. 273.

Paulding, James Kirke. 147.
C. L. S. C. REUNION. 104.

ETIQUETTE. 99.

Porter, Ďr. Noah. 146.

AC. L. S. C. TESTIMONY.

EXPERIENCE, A C. L. S. C. 167.

Prescott, William H. 335.

C. L. S. C. WORK. J. H. Vincent, D.D. FAILINGS. J. Mortimer-Granville. 39.

Sandys, George. 14.

44, 102, 165, 228, 287, 355, 421, 477, FLOWERS, Early. Francis George Heath.

Taylor, Bayard. 446.

225.

Thaxter, Celia. 447.

C. L. S. C. '84. 355.

FRANCE, Republican Prospects in. Joseph

Warner, Charles Dudley. 394. COMMENCEMENT, C. L. S.C. Class 1883.' Reinach. 80.
Washington, George. 78.

FRENCH HISTORY, Readings in. J. H.

Whittier, John G. 264.

COOPER INSTITUTE. J. M. Buckley, D.D. Vincent, D.D. 315, 377.

AMERICANS, ÉCCENTRIC. C. E. Bishop. 398.

FROM THE BALTIC TO THE ADRIATIC.

43, 95, 211, 275, 348, 510, 584.
COUNCIL OF Nice, The. 581.

36, 87.

AMUSEMENTS THE LONDON POOR. COURTS OF THREE PRESIDENTS—Thiers, GARDENING AMONG THE CHINESE. 215.

Walter Besant. 457:

MacMahon, Grévy. 566.

GERMAN HISTORY. Rev. W. G. Wil-

ARDENT SPIRITS. B. W. Richardson, DEAD-LETTER OFFICE, The. Pattie L. liams. 1, 63, 129, 189, 251.

M.D. 347.

Collins. 460.

GERMAN LITERATURE. 66.

ARNOLD, MATTHEW. Prof. A. B. Hyde, DREAMY OLD TOWN, A. Edith Sessions GERMAN LITERATURE, Extracts.From.

D.D. 270.

Tupper. 520.

Goethe, Johann Wolfgang. 194.

ART, Readings in. 11, 75, 142, 204, 262, EARTHQUAKES-ISCHIA AND JAVA. 83. Heine, Heinrich. 253.
330, 384, 442, 500,

EDITOR'S NOTE-Book. 54, 117, 180, 241, Humboldt, Alexander von. 253

ASTRONOMY OF THE HEAVENS. Prof. M. 302, 368, 430, 488, 548, 610.

Lessing, Gotthold Ephraim. 134.

B. Goff.

EDITOR'S OUTLOOK :

Luther, Martin. 134.

December, 183.

C. L. S. C. an Educational Necessity, Sachs, Hans. 133.

January, 218.

Schiller, Friedrich von. 193.

February, 278.

C. L. S. C. Plan, The. 178.

Schleiermacher, Friedrich. 254.

March, 346.

C. L. S. C. Course for 1884-5, The. Schopenhauer, Arthur. 255.

April, 405.

607

Schlegel, Friedrich. 195..

May, 455.

Chautauqua Outlook for 1884. 609. Walther von der Vogelweide. 132.

June, 528.

College Reform, A. 116.

Winckelman, Johann Joachim. 193.

July, 569.

Complaint, An Unjust. 367. GOING TO EUROPE. 598.

August, 570.

Day, an Extra. 180.

GOSPELS, THE, Considered as a Drama.

September, 571.

Dress and Income. 300.

D. H. Wheeler, D.D. 412.

BANQUET TO CHAUTAUQUA TRUSTEES. Efficiency and Tenure. 547. GRADUATES C. L. S. C. 310.
307.

Evangelists. 239.

GREAT ORGAN AT FRIBOURG, The. Edith
BLUE LAWS. 156.

Floods. 429.

Sessions Tupper. 94.
BOOK KNOWLEDGE AND MANNERS. Lord Founder's Day. 428.

HESITATION AND ERRORS IN SPEECH. J.
Chesterfield. 161.

General Conference, Some Points on Mortimer-Granville. 454.
Books RECEIVED. 127, 187, 249, 314, 496, the. 608.

HIBERNATION. J. G. Wood, M.A.

150.

556, 612.

Greece, History of. 116.

HYACINTH Bulbs. Grant Allen. 351.

BOTANICAL NOTES. Prof. J. H. Mont- Greeting, To the Class of 1884. 546. INEBRIATES, What to do with the. W.w.

gomery. 227, 287.

Headquarters of the C. L. S. C. 238. Godding. 514.

CALIFORNIA. Frances E. Willard, Pres. Idea, Dr. Newman's New. 487. INTERMEDIATE NORMAL CLASS.

W. C. T. U.

Ingenuity in Local Circles. 365. ISLAND PARK ASSEMBLY. 31.

CAÑONS OF THE COLORADO, The. Major Is Crime Interesting ? 366.

LANDMARKS OF BOSTON. E. E. Hall.

G. W. Powell. 564.

Knowledge, Superfluous. 488.

572.

CHARACTER BUILDING. James Kerr. Lawlessness, Two kinds of. 485. LAKESIDE ASSEMBLY. 31.

153

Letters of William Cullen Bryant. 367. ' Law, Commercial. E. Č. Reynolds, Esq.

CHARITY OF PARIS, A Private. 471.

Luther, Martin. 179.

260, 327, 382, 439.

188

222.

M.A. 353;

221.

LIFE OF A PLANET, The. Richard Proc- OUTLINE OF C. L. S. C. READINGS. SEA AS AN AQUARIUM, The. C. L. An-
tor. 157.
October, 47.

derson, M.D. 279, 341.
LOCAL CIRCLE, How to Conduct a. 107. November, 112.

SKATING AND SKATERS. Robert Mac-
LOCAL CIRCLE Notice. 47.

December, 166.

Gregor. 159.
LOCAL CIRCLES. 105, 169, 230, 288, 356, January, 228.

SOLDIERS' HOME. O. W. Logan. 529.
422, 478, 539, 601.

February, 288.

SPECULATION IN BUSINESS. Jonathan.
LONDON, Disraeli's.
157
March, 355.

281.
LONDON PREACHERS, Some. 536.

April, 422.

STATIONERY, C. L. S. C. 103.
Low SPIRITS. J. Mortimer - Granville. May, 478.

STEEL HORSE, Our. 523.
85.

June, 539;

SUMMER MEETINGS AT CHAUTAUQUA. 597.
MAN OF LEARNING, TELL ME SOMETHING. PEKING, The Imperial College of. G. W. SUNBEAMS FROM THE CIRCLE. 167, 229.
Margaret Meredith. 150.

Smyth. 587:

SUNDAY READINGS. J. H. Vincent, D.D.
LDT'S
MENDELSSOHN'S GRAVE AND HUMBOLDT's Phillips, Wendell. Edward Everett . 6, 70, 137, 198, 257, 328, 388, 440, 499,
HOME. 339,
Hale. 451.

560.
MIGRATIONS ON Foot. Rev. J. G. Wood, PHYSICAL SCIENCE. 3, 67, 135, 196, 255. SUN AND STRANGE SUNSETS, Green. 400.

PLANT NUTRITION. Maxwell T. Masters, | TABLE-TALK OF NAPOLEON BONAPARTE.
MISSIONS, Christian.

M.D. 164.

224, 269.
MONONO LAKE ASSEMBLY. 30.

POACHERS IN ENGLAND. Jas. Turves. 90. TALK ABOUT Books. 126, 248, 314, 436,
MONTEAGLE ASSEMBLY. Řev. J. H. PoE, Edgar Allen. C. E. Bishop: 407.

495, 556, 612.
Warren. 29.

POLITICAL ECONOMY. G. M. Steele, D.D.' TEMPERATURE. J. Mortimer Granville.
MONTEREY ASSEMBLY. 28.

9, 73, 140, 202.

158.
MOUNTAIN LAKE ASSEMBLY. 31.

POPULAR EDUCATION, C. L. S. C. An- TENEMENT House LIFE IN NEW YORK.
MYTHOLOGY, Slavonic. A. H. Cummings. nouncement. 48, 175.

Geo. A. Townsend. 561.
34.

PRISONERS AND PRISONS, Military. O. W. TRICKS OF CONJURORS. Thomas Frost.
NAPOLEON'S MARSHALS.

Longan. 475.

125.
NAVAL FORCE, Our. Lieut. G. W. Mentz. PROHIBITION IN MAINE.

Hon. Neal : TROLLOPE'S (ANTHONY) AUTOBIOGRAPHY.
595.
Dow. 415.

400.
NAVY, The. Lieut. G. W. Mentz. 524. QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS. A. M. Martin. UNITED STATES HISTORY. 267, 336, 395,
NEW ENGLAND ASSEMBLY. 32.

49, 109, 172, 234, 294, 362, 425, 482, 544. 448, 506.
New ENGLAND BRANCH, Class of '86. RECREATION. James Paget. 274. UNIVERSITY, Chautauqua., 478,
103.

RECREATIONS OF PARIS WORKMEN. R. VANISHING Types. Rev. Edward Sprague.
NORMAL Class, Chautauqua Graduates Heath. 153.

577
(1883): 374.
REUNION AT MILWAUKEE. 166.

VEGETABLE VILLAINS. R. Turner. 33,
Normal CLASS, Chautauqua. J. L. Hurl- Roman History, Readings in. W. C. 86.
but, D.D., and R. S. Holmes, M.A., In- Wilkinson. 437, 497.

WAVERLEY Novels. Wallace Bruce. 17.
structors. 112, 176, 236, 297, 364, 426, ROUND-Table, C. L. S. C. 171, 233, 292. White House, The: Mrs. Pattie L. Col-
484, 545.
RUSSIAN NOVELIST, A. Gabriel Monod.

lins. 557:
NURSES, Trained. Lulie W: Winchester.

154.

WINE AND WATER. Benj. W. Richard-
466.

SCHOOLS OF BOSTON, Industrial. E. E. son, M.D. 283.
OCEAN MONARCH, An. G. Browne Goode.

Hale. 417

WOMEN AS MISTRESSES OF HOUSEHOLDS,
582.

Scott, WALTER, Eight Centuries with. Duties of. F. P. Cobbe. 473.
OSTRICH HUNTING. Lady Florence Dixie. Wallace Bruce. 91, 162, 216, 284, WOMEN, Work for. 219.

343, 403. 467, 533. 589.

WRECKAGE, Social. Ellice Hopkins. 40

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220.

POETRY

AT REST. Sarah Doudney. 42.

Growth. Mrs. Emily J. Bugbee. 561. Rise Higher. Helen G. Hawthorne. 571.
AUTUMN SYMPATHY. E. Ġ. Charlesworth. HELEN'S TOWER. Chas. Blatherwick. 338. SABBATH CHIMES. Phebe A. Holden. 402.
80.

His Cold. Foliot S. Pierpoint. 269. SELF-DEPENDENCE. Matthew Arnold.
Blossoms, To. R. Herrick.

529.

How we CAME TOGETHER. W. C. Wil- 472.
CHILLON, Sonnet on. Byron. 582.

kinson, D.D. 32.

STILL YOUNG. Ellen O. Peck. 412.
CRACKED FIDDLE, A lay of. Fred. Lang. Ivy, The. Henry Burton. 19.

STORK, The. Translated from the Swed-
bridge. 155
LIGHT AT EVENTIDE. E. G. Charles-

ish. 214.
DIVINE SCULPTOR, The. Mrs. Emily J. worth.

397:

SUMMER, A Remnant of. E. O. P. 156.
Bugbee. 451.

LUTHER. Mrs. S. R. Graham Clark. 275. To My Books. Lady Sterling Maxwell.
FIR TREE, The. Luella Clark. 347. MY YEARS. Ada Iddings Gale. 343.

83.
FLOTSOM (1492). J. Logie Robertson. Night. Charles Grindrod. 510. UNDER THE AUTUMN SKIES. Mrs. Emily
341.
NIGHT. A. St. J. A. 211.

J. Bugbee. 161.
Flowery FIELDS, In. Mary Harrison. PRAYER OF SOCRATES, The. Stuart WHERE LIES THE Music? Alice C. Jen-
38.
Blackie. 537.

nings. 17
GONE. E. G. Charlesworth. 40.

RETURNING. Mary Harrison. 148. ZENOBIA. Ada Iddings Gale. 152.

THE CHAUTAUQUAN.

A MONTHLY MAGAZINE DEVOTED TO THE PROMOTION OF TRUE CULTURE. ORGAN OF

THE CHAUTAUQUA LITERARY AND SCIENTIFIC CIRCLE.

VOL. IV.

OCTOBER, 1883.

No. I.

Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle.

FOR THE

and to the Prosna and the Lower Niemen. The country is

mountainous in the south, hilly in the center, and flat in the President--Lewis Miller, Akron, Ohio.

north, where it forms part of the great plain which takes in the Superintendent of Instruction—Rev. J. H. Vincent, D.D., New Haven, Conn.

whole of north-eastern Europe. The western part of this plain Counselors—Rev. Lyman Abbott, D.D.; Rev. J. M. Gibson, D.D.;

takes in the country between the Teutoburg Wood and the Bishop H. W. Warren, D.D.; Rev. W. C. Wilkinson, D.D.

North Sea. As it passes eastward it widens till it reaches from Office Secretary-Miss Kate F. Kimball, Plainfield, N. J.

the Erz and Riesen Mountains to the Baltic. A part of South General Secretary-Albert M. Martin, Pittsburgh, Pa.

Germany slopes toward the east, and is watered by the Danube;

but the general slope of the country is toward the north. Among REQUIRED READING

the rivers flowing northward are the Rhine, the Ems, the Weser, the Elbe, the Oder, and the Vistula."-Sime.

“Germany has varied very much in extent at different times. Chautauqua Literary and Scientific Circle for 1883-4. This is due partly to the fact that it has no clearly-marked

natural boundaries on the east and west, but chiefly to the OCTOBER.

peculiarity of its position. It is the central country of Europe.

Being surrounded by most of the leading nations of the ConGERMAN HISTORY.

tinent, the Germans have been involved, more than any other

people, in the general history of Europe. Of all their neighbors, By Rev. W. G. WILLIAMS, A. M.

the Scandinavians are most nearly allied to the Germans. Both

are branches of the Teutonic race. But the Germans are also I.

connected, although not so closely, with the other surrounding The student of history has need of divisions. By their aid

peoples. All, if we except the Magyars or Hungarians, who alone can he hope to have command of the facts and events

are Turanians, belong to the great Aryan family.”—Sime. with which history in so large part deals. It is well therefore

Ancient authors mention several German tribes, as well as to begin the study of any particular history by noting such

their dwelling places, with greater or less precision. Several changes, such epoch-making events as may form partition walls

of them also speak of the chief tribes, among which the single of boxes in which may be placed our classified information.

septs united themselves. But their statements are not sufficiently The history of Germany has been variously divided into

unanimous or precise to give us that clear view which we would periods by the different authors. That which we have adopted

so willingly obtain. The origin of the Germanic nations, therehere has the sanction of the majority and will be found ex

fore, like that of all others, is uncertain. To assign to them a ceedingly natural, and hence simple and convenient. The

distinct historical origin is to make an assertion without evistudent should memorize it thoroughly, being assured that

dence, though it is now indisputably established that the Teuthough a very general history of itself, nevertheless it is more

tonic dialects belong to one great family with the Latin, than many of supposed information could tell of the history of

the Greek, the Sanscrit, and other European and Asiatic this wonderful people.

tongues. All the positive knowledge that we have of the GerDIVISION OF THE HISTORY OF THE GERMANS INTO TEN PERIODS. man nations, previous to their contact with the Romans, is First-From the most ancient times to the conquests of the

exceedingly vague and mere conjecture.”—Menzies.

'The Romans first heard the name Germans' from the Franks, under Clovis (A. D. 486). SecondFrom conquests of Clovis to Charlemagne (511-768).

Celtic Gauls, in whose language it meant simply neighbors. Third-Charlemagne to Henry I. (768-919).

The first notice of a Germanic tribe was given to the world by Fourth-Henry I. to Rodolphus of Hapsburg. The Saxon,

the Greek navigator Pytheas, who made a voyage to the Baltic Swabian, and Hohenstaufen houses (919-1273).

in the year 330 B. C. Beyond the amber coast, eastward of the

mouth of the Vistula, he found the Goths, of whom we hear FifthRodolphus I. of Hapsburg to Charles V. (1273-1520). Sixth-Charles V. to Peace of Westphalia (1519-1648).

nothing more until they appear, several centuries later, on the

northern shore of the Black Sea. For more than two hundred SeventhPeace of Westphalia to French Revolution (16481789).

years there is no further mention of the Germanic races; then,

most unexpectedly, the Romans were called upon to make their Eighth-French Revolution to Peace of Paris (1789-1815). NinthPeace of Paris to Franco-Prussian War (1815-1870

personal acquaintance.”—Bayard Taylor.

At the time of their first contact with the Romans, these 1871).

Germanic tribes had lost even the tradition of their Asiatic Tenth--From Franco-Prussian War to present time.

origin. They supposed themselves to have originated upon the THE PRIMITIVE POPULATIONS OF GERMANY, THEIR ORIGIN, soil where they dwelt, sprung either from the earth or descended CUSTOMS, RELIGION, ETC.

fron the gods. According to the most popular legend, the “Germany, or Deutschland, occupies a large part of Central Wr-god Tuisko, or Tiu, had a son, Mannus (whence the word Europe. Speaking roughly, it now reaches from the Alps to the man is derived), who was the first human parent of the German Baltic and the North Sea, and from the valleys of the Rhine race. Many centuries must have elapsed since their first settleand the Maes to the Danube as far as the March and the Mur, ment in Europe, or they could not have so completely changed

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