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present."

AND SOCIAL

SEX IN EDUCATION;

CHILD LIFE.
Or, A Fair Chance for the Girls. By EDWARD
H. CLARKE, M.D. I vol. 16mo. $1.25.

Poetical selections. Edited by JOHN G.

WHITTIER. Beautifully illustrated. $3.00. Professor Agassiz. “This volume cannot fail to awake the public to the importance of a better understanding of the questions involved in the present system of education. Dr.

CHILD LIFE IN PROSE. Clarke has a right to be heard, on account of the study he has made of the physiological principles involved in Edited by John G. WHITTIER. Copiously the discussion, as well as for his extensive practice in cases of disorders arising from a neglect of proper pre

illustrated. $3.00. cautions during the school years of our young people. I am prepared to subscribe to every one of his most

These two volumes, says the Boston Advertiser. comprehensive propositions, and I am sure the com

“would constitute a library for any family of children, munity will derive the greatest benefit from a due re

the value of which they would never cease to acknowlgard to his recommendations.

edge. Parents who are forming little libraries for their “Very truly yours,

households will do well to begin with these two rol "L. Agassiz."

umes, even if their means forbid buying any others at

- Boston Advertiser. Christian Intelligencer. “We cordially commend the treatise to fathers and MATTHEW ARNOLD. mothers, and believe its suggestions will be productive of most valuable results."

Literature and Dogma. LITERARY

AN ESSAY TOWARDS BETTER AP.

PREHENSION OF THE BIBLE.
JUDGMENTS.

I vol 16mo. $1.50.
By W. R. Greg, author of “Enigmas of Life,”

“Once again the much-shaken mind of this genera etc. I vol. Izmo. $2.00.

tion has a promise of certainty and peace offered to it;

and there are characteristics of Mr. Arnold's creed CONTENTS: – Madame de Stael; British and Foreign which are likely to make it, to a large section of English Characteristics; False Morality of Lady Novelists ; Kingsley and Carlyle; French Fiction ; The Lowest of rare moral and intellectual force, original in the

men, more attractive than any rival. . . . It is a book Deep; Chateaubriand; M. DeTocqueville ; Why are greatness and directness of its aim as well as in its style Women redundant? Truth versus Edification ; Time; and diction." The Contemporary Review. Good People.

In these essays Mr. Greg shows the same masterly skill in treating literary and social topics, which his re

Essays in Criticism. markable work, “Enigmas of Life,' evinced for discussing the most profound problems of human existence and destiny. The important subjects and notable per

I vol.

16mo. $2.00. sons brought under consideration, and the large wisdom and deep sincerity stamped on every page, give this “The essays in this volume, in richness of matter, in volume peculiar attractions for intelligent and thought- ingenuousness of tone, in a certain indescribable fins ful readers.

ness and subtlety of literary treatment, are incomparably superior to the ordinary run of periodical criticism.

There is nothing sectarian, nothing narrow, DothThe Story of Goethe's Life. ing exclusive in Mr. Arnold's discussions. He gives a

noble example of the exercise of criticism, according to BY GEORGE HENRY LEWES. his own definition of the term, as a disinterested enWith Portrait.

deavor to learn and propagate the best that is known I vol.

i zmo. $1.50. and thought in the world. - New York Tribune. Mr. Lewes's “Life of Goethe" is generally conceded to be a masterpiece in biography, and altogether the most satisfactory of the many Lives of the great poet, THE novelist, dramatist, and philosopher. In this volume the author has omitted such portions of the former work as could be omitted without lessening the completeness

OR, THE LAST OF THE 'TZINS. of the work as a narrative of Goethe's career, and thus has made a book so inexpensive as to come within reach | A Tale of the Conquest of Mexico. By Major of all the admirers of the illustrious German's genius. General Lew WALLACE. I vcl. I 2mo.

600 pages. $2.00. COMMON SENSE IN RELIGION.

The Atheneum (London). A series of Essays. By JAMES FREEMAN CLARKE,

“We do not hesitate to say that 'The Fair God' is D.D., author of "Ten Great Religions,” etc.

one of the most powerful historical novels we have ever 12mo. $2.

read. . : . The opening, like that of most archæological

novels, is dull, but the scene where, in the sunrise, In this volume the author presents, with eminent Montezuma reads his fate, the dance scene, and the ability and striking simplicity, what he regards as com- entry of the Spaniards to the capital, are drawn in a mon-sense views of God, human nature, the Bible, sin, style of which

we think few living writers capable; and salvation, heaven and hell, the future life, and other the battles are Homeric in their grandeur. Cortes and themes of the highest importance. The nature of the Guatemozin live, and the whole of the characters breathe subjects treated and the remarkable wisdom, clearness the spirit of ancient Mexico. As a romantic treatment and candor displayed in treating them, give this book of the history of a beaten cause, “The Falr God' is peculiar value and significance.

equal to 'Rienzi.'"
For sale by all booksellers. Sent, post-paid, on receipt of price by the Publishers,

JAMES R. OSGOOD & CO., Boston.

FAIR GOD;

Fifth Series,
Volume IV.

}

No. 1541. - December 20, 1873.

From Beginning,

Vol. CXIX.

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CONTENTS.
I. VOLTAIRE,

Quarterly Review,
II. Sukie's Bov., By the author of “The Hu-
guenot Family,” etc.
Part II.,

Sunday Magazine,
III. PLUTARCH'S ESSAYS,

Fortnightly Review,
IV. ST. SYMEON Salos. By the Rev. S. Baring-
Gould, M.A.,

Fraser's Magasine,
V. China's FUTURE PLACE IN PHILOLOGY, Macmillan's Magazine,
VI. LEGENDS OF OLD AMERICA,

Cornhill Magazine,
VII. WOMEN AT SCHOOL,

Saturday Review,

POETRY.
THE BUTTERFLY AND THE CHILD, 706 | ELODIA,
THE NETHERLAND MARTYRS, 1535. By

EVENING LONGINGS. By Björnstjerne
Nathan Haskell Dole,

7061 Björnson,

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PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY BY
LIT TELL & GAY, BOSTON.

TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION. For Eight DOLLARS, remitted directly to the Publishers, the Living Age will be punctually forwarded for a year, free of postage. But we do not prepay atare on less than a year, nor when we have to pay commission for forwarding the money; nor when we club'the L Age with another periodical.

An extra copy of The Living Age is sent gratis to any one getting up a club of Five New Subscribers.

Remittances should be made by bank draft or check, or by post-office inoney-order, if possible. If neither of these can be procured, the money should be sent in a registered letter. All postmasters are obliged to register letters when requested to do so. Drafts, checks and money-orders should be made payable to the order of LITTBLL & GAY.

THE BUTTERFLY AND THE CHILD. Their names are lost to us, but their example

Flames like a beacon through the mist of ages, I PASSED and saw in a sunlit room A butterfly flutter its golden plume,

And bids us bravely stand when men would While a baby vainly strove to clasp

trample Its silken wings in its tiny grasp.

Upon our faith, and overthrow our altars;

When fiery persecution round us rages, I passed again, and the sunlit room

And when our courage under trial falters. Was shrouded in darkness, and saddened in

Transcript gloom, And the voice of the baby was silent and

hushed, And beside him the wings of the butterfly

ELODIA. crushed;

O SUDDEN heaven ! superb surprise ! For cold and still on the snowy bed,

O day to dream again ! Like a snow-drop, pale, lay the baby dead;

O Spanish eyebrows, Spanish eyes, And the tangled maze of his sunny

hair

Voice and allures of Spain ! Seemed bright with the light that the angels

No answering glance her glances seek,

Her smile no suitor knows; Once more I passed, and methought on high

That lucid pallor of her cheek A song broke forth from the distant sky,

Is lovelier than the rose; — And I felt as the cadence swept along 'T was the silver sound of tnat baby's song - But when she wakens, when she stirs,

And life and love begin, “Ever my father's face I see,

How blaze those amorous eyes of hers,
Ever, forever, it smiles on me,

And what a god within !
And never again shall my voice be hushed
Or the prize I am grasping be withered and

I saw her heart's arising strife,
crushed.”

Half eager, half afraid ;
I paused ; I would not wake to life

The tinted marble maid.

wear.

NATHAN HASKELL DOLE.

I.

But starlike through my dreams shall go, THE NETHERLAND MARTYRS, 1535.

Pale, with a fiery train,
The Spanish glory, Spanish glow,
The passion which is Spain.

Macmillan's Magazine.
Amid the flames their souls were full of cheer,
And facing the dark mystery of death,
Unflinchingly they clung unto their faith,
No whit relenting at the beck of fear.

EVENING LONGINGS. And while the crowd stood round to mock and

BY BJORNSTJERNE BJORNSON. jeer,

1. These martyrs blessed them with their dying breath,

The Princess sat high in her maiden-bower, Remembering what the Holy Scripture saith, And the boy blew his horn below by the For they were loving men although austere.

tower :

Be silent, thou boy, why blowest thou so? They died unhonored for their constancy;

Thou hinderest my thoughts that afar would go Brave men were they; yet no one mourned or With the setting sun.

wept. They suffered for the sake of liberty ; And in their death, their deathless fame is kept. The Princess sat high in her maiden-bower, But had they lived, their story would have slept And the boy no longer blew by the tower : – Uncared for in the tomb of history.

" Why art thou so silent? Again thou must

blow: II.

Thou helfest my thoughts that afar would go The faith they held was bigoted and blind.

With the setting sun." The God they worshipped was a cruel God.

III. A rugged and a weary path they trod; And life seemed unto them well nigh unkind. The Princess sat high in her maiden-bower,

And the boy blew again below by the tower; So when the summons came to leave behind And then she wept in the eventide : Life's bitterness, they bowed beneath the rod, What do I then want, my God!” she sighed: And gladly laid aside the heavy load –

Then the sun went down. A martyr's never-fading crown to find.

Saint Pauls

II.

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