Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity

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Harvard University Press, 1989 - 601 oldal

In this extensive inquiry into the sources of modern selfhood, Charles Taylor demonstrates just how rich and precious those resources are. The modern turn to subjectivity, with its attendant rejection of an objective order of reason, has led--it seems to many--to mere subjectivism at the mildest and to sheer nihilism at the worst. Many critics believe that the modern order has no moral backbone and has proved corrosive to all that might foster human good. Taylor rejects this view. He argues that, properly understood, our modern notion of the self provides a framework that more than compensates for the abandonment of substantive notions of rationality.

The major insight of Sources of the Self is that modern subjectivity, in all its epistemological, aesthetic, and political ramifications, has its roots in ideas of human good. After first arguing that contemporary philosophers have ignored how self and good connect, the author defines the modern identity by describing its genesis. His effort to uncover and map our moral sources leads to novel interpretations of most of the figures and movements in the modern tradition. Taylor shows that the modern turn inward is not disastrous but is in fact the result of our long efforts to define and reach the good. At the heart of this definition he finds what he calls the affirmation of ordinary life, a value which has decisively if not completely replaced an older conception of reason as connected to a hierarchy based on birth and wealth. In telling the story of a revolution whose proponents have been Augustine, Montaigne, Luther, and a host of others, Taylor's goal is in part to make sure we do not lose sight of their goal and endanger all that has been achieved. Sources of the Self provides a decisive defense of the modern order and a sharp rebuff to its critics.

 

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Don't tell my dissertation advisers that I hadn't read this before I finished- they might revoke my degree. On the other hand, they might say "well, you don't really need to read this unless you're a ... Teljes értékelés elolvasása

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Felhasználói ismertető  - wonderperson - LibraryThing

Yesterday, early in the morning, I finished this book. This was a six month stint and it took a mighty effort just to finish it off, meaning that I lost much needed sleep in order to bring the reading ... Teljes értékelés elolvasása

Tartalomjegyzék

Inescapable Frameworks
3
The Self in Moral Space
25
Ethics of Inarticulacy
53
Moral Sources
91
PART II
105
Inwardness
109
Moral Topography
111
Platos SelfMastery
115
God Loveth Adverbs 21 1
211
Rationalized Christianity
234
Moral Sentiments
248
The Providential Order 166
266
The Culture of Modernity
285
Fractured Horizons
305
Radical Enlightenment
321
Nature as Source
355

In Interiore Homine
127
Descartess Disengaged Reason
143
Lockes Punctual Self
159
Exploring 1Humaine Condition
177
Inner Nature
185
A Digression on Historical Explanation
199
PART III
209
The Expressivist Turn
368
Our Victorian Contemporaries
393
Visions of the PostRomantic Age
419
Epiphanies of Modernism
456
The Conflicts of Modernity
495
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A szerzőről (1989)

Charles Taylor works creatively with material drawn from both analytical and Continental sources. He was born in Montreal, educated at McGill and Oxford universities, and has taught political science and philosophy at McGill since 1961. He describes himself as a social democrat, and he was a founder and editor of the New Left Review. Taylor's work is an example of renewed interest in the great traditional questions of philosophy. It is informed by a vast scope of literature, ranging from Plato to Jacques Derrida. More accessible to the average reader than most recent original work in philosophy, Taylor's oeuvre centers on questions on philosophical anthropology, that is, on how human nature relates to ethics and society. Taylor develops his themes with an engaging, historically accurate insight.

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