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A MANUAL

OF

ENGLISH COMPOSITION.

WITH COPIOUS ILLUSTRATIONS AND

PRACTICAL EXERCISES.

BY THEOPHILUS D. HALL, M.A.,

FELLOW OF UNIVERSITY COLLEGE, LONDON; JOINT-AUTHOR OF 'A SCHOOL MANUAL

OF ENGLISH GRAMMAR;' &c. &c.

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DR. WM. SMITH'S ENGLISH COURSE.

A SCHOOL MANUAL OF ENGLISH GRAMMAR; With

Copious Exercises. By WM. SMITH, D.C.L., and T. D. HALI., M.A.

(256 pp.) Post 8vo. 38. 6d. A PRIMARY ENGLISH GRAMMAR FOR ELEMENTARY

SCHOOLS. With Exercises and Questions. Based upon the above

work. By T. D. HALL, M.A. (76 pp.) 16mo. 18. “We doubt whether any grammar could give an introduction to the English language more clear, concise, and full than this does.”_Watchman. A PRIMARY HISTORY OF BRITAIN for ELEMENTARY

SCHOOLS. Edited by WM. SMITH, D.C.L. (368 pp.) 12mo. 28. 60. “ The modest title of this history scarcely indicates its real value. It is an admirable work, one of the best short school histories of England we have seen."-Educational Times.

A SCHOOL MANUAL OF MODERN GEOGRAPHY, PHY

SICAL AND POLITICAL. By JOHN RICHARDSON, M.A., Diocesan

Inspector of Schools. (400 pp.) Post 8vo. 5s. “ After a careful examination of Mr. Richardson's manual, we are bound to say that it is the most comprehensive, accurate, and methodical geograpby with which we are familiar." - School Guardian.

PREFACE.

This Manual has been prepared in order to supply a want very generally felt, namely, that of a really serviceable class-book of English Composition. The Exercises have been arranged in a strictly systematic progression, from the construction of simple sentences to the treatment of really difficult subjects. Constant reference is made to the “School Manual of English Grammar,” to which the present work may be regarded as a Supplement.

In the exercises for original composition some use has been made of passages in verse, the sense of which is to be expressed in prose. But no poetical passage has been introduced the matter of which may not with equal fitness be expressed without the aid of verse. The adherence to this rule has involved some sacrifice, from the consequent exclusion of various choice and interesting poetical extracts, which might otherwise have been employed. This, however, seemed a less serious evil than to require pupils systematically to set about the debasement of noble literary work. In true poetry, the form in which the material is cast may be assumed to be the most perfect attainable; and to convert it to prose is, to say the least, to alter it for the worse. On the contrary, such extracts as are to be found on pp. 32, foll., lose little or nothing by being “ trans-prosed,” and may be safely handed over to the manipulation of the student.

It will be noticed that the names of the authors from whom the illustrations of inaccurate English are taken,

are in most instances attached. The writer wishes it to be understood that such citation implies no expression of opinion on the literary merits of those authors, beyond the passage actually adduced. English style-unlike Latin and French, for example-is still so far undeveloped, that occasional inaccuracies are to be met with in all but a few of the most accomplished writers.

It is earnestly hoped that all the exercises introduced, both in the body of the work and in the Appendix, will be found really practicable and serviceable.

A large number of subjects for original composition has been provided ; and for the greater part of these, hints and materials have been added. No exercises have been incorporated with Part III.; but Nos. 82-100 in the Appendix will be found to furnish practice in most of the rules laid down in this section of the work.

The faulty paragraphs (Append. Ex. 82, 84, &c.), it need scarcely be said, are not to be found in any author in their present form.

The exercises on Part V. are designed for more advanced pupils only.

Although the writer has spared no labour in the preparation of this work, he does not expect that it will be found free from imperfections; and will thankfully receive any suggestions from practical teachers, with a view to its improvement.

BOWDON, NEAR MANCHESTER.

Nov. 3, 1879.

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