Home Life: What it Is, and what it Needs

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W. V. Spencer, 1864 - 180 oldal
 

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60. oldal - The happiness of life, on the contrary, is made up of minute fractions— the little, soon-forgotten charities of a kiss, a smile, a kind look, a heartfelt compliment in the disguise of playful raillery, and the countless other infinitesimals of pleasurable thought and genial feeling. Kath. "Well, Sir; you have said quite enough to make me despair of finding a " John Anderson, my Jo, John...
xvii. oldal - ... being, for what we know, infinite) : but still we become familiar with the upper views, tastes, and tempers of our associates. And it is hardly in man to estimate justly what is familiar to him. In travelling along at night, as Hazlitt says, we catch a glimpse into cheerful-looking rooms with light blazing in them, and we conclude, involuntarily, how happy the inmates must be.
93. oldal - Look, the world's comforter, with weary gait, His day's hot task has ended in the west : The owl, night's herald, shrieks, — 'tis very late ; The sheep are gone to fold, birds to their nest ; And coal-hlack clouds that shadow heaven's light Do summon us to part, and bid good night.
173. oldal - It made the fortune of every one prominently connected with it, except the author, who was not even complimented with a copy of his own song.
72. oldal - that the fate of the child is always the work of his mother,' and the corroborations of it in the case of John Wesley, the Napier family, and many others — much remains to be said for the other side of the question, and examples, such as the second Pitt and the second Peel, may be urged to show that -not seldom it is from the male parent that ability, energy...
112. oldal - Where there is the ability and the taste, I regard music — as combining in happiest proportions instruction and pleasure — as standing at the head of the home evening enjoyments. What a never-failing resource have those homes which God has blessed with this gift ! How many pleasant family circles gather nightly about the piano, how many a home is vocal with the voice of song or psalm ! In other days, in how many village homes the father's viol led the domestic harmony, and sons with clarinet...
113. oldal - ... frolic of our souls reverberating from its keys ? The home that has a piano, — what capacity for evening pleasure and profit has it ! Alas that so many wives and mothers should speak of their ability to play as a mere accomplishment of the past, and that children should grow up looking on the piano as a thing unwisely kept for company and show...
112. oldal - In other days, in how many village homes the father's viol led the domestic harmony, and sons with clarinet or flute or manly voice, and daughters sweetly and clearly filling in the intervals of sound, made a joyful noise ! There was then no piano, to the homes of this generation the great, the universal boon and comforter. One pauses and blesses it, as he hears it through the open farmhouse window, or detects its sweetness stealing out amid the jargons of the city, — an angel's benison upon...
42. oldal - And have women no disappointments ?" " Oh yes, Willoughby, plenty ! The mistress, when the Church has made her a wife, is as often, and as much, and more deceived. At the altar she imagines herself united to a man of warm affections, noble thoughts, and great protective power, one for whose head the church roof is scarcely holy cover enough ; but she finds herself at home instead of all this, to have married a craving body of wants ; shirts that want washing, hose that want mending, whims that want...
160. oldal - ... many ; and thus our fathers, by compelling obedience in their children, enabled them to rule themselves, and fitted them to rule wisely in their homes, and made of us the law-respecting and the law-abiding people that we are. In the genuine New England home of to-day, still that good, old-fashioned thing called obedience lingers. In too many homes, judging by what we see and hear, it is deemed intrusive, and turned out. Parents have ceased to command where children have ceased to obey. Aspiring...

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