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sedly written in imitation of the style, as well as of the spirit of the elder poets; but with a few exceptions, the Author believes that the language adopted in it has been equally intelligible for these three last centuries. The lines entitled Expostulation and Reply, and those which follow, arose out of conversation with a friend who was somewhat unreasonably attached to modern books of moral philosophy.

CONTENTS.

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The Rime of the Ancyent Marinere ...
The Foster-Mother's Tale - ... .
Lines left upon a Seat in a Yew-tree which stands

near the Lake of Esthwaite - - - - -
The Nightingale, a Conversational Poem - .
The Female Vagrant - - - - - - - -
Goody Blake and Harry Gill - ....
Lines written at a small distance from my House,

and sent by my little Boy to the Person to

whom they are addressed - - - - -
Simon Lee, the old Huntsman . .
Anecdote for Fathers ---
We are seven . . . . . ..
Lines written in early spring
The Thorn - - - - -
The last of the Flock - -
The Dungeon ... - - - - - - - -
The Mad Mother - - -
The Idiot Boy - - - -
Lines written near Richmond, upon the Thames,

at Evening - - - - - - - • - -
Expostulation and Reply - - - - - . .
The Tables turned ; an Evening Scene, on the

same subject - - - - - - - - -
Old Man travelling - - - - - - . .
The Complaint of a forsaken Indian Woman -
The Convict --- -- -- ----
Lines written a few miles above Tintern Abbey

115
117
133
139
141

149

180
183

186
189
193
197
202

THE RIME

OF THE

ANCYENT MARINERE,

in

SEVEN PARTS.

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