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LONDON:

Printed by W. Wilson, St. John's Square,
FOR VERNOR, HOOD, AND SHARPE; LONGMAN, HURST, REES, ORME,
AND BROWN ; J. CUTHELL; J. HARRIS ; J. CUNDEE; B. CROSBY
AND CO.; AND J. AND J. RICHARDSON.

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Previous to the Roman Invasion, Middlesex was included in the district inhabited by the Trinobantes, or Trinovantes, who probably obtained that name from the situation of their country on the borders of the broad expanse of water formed by the Thames. Thus the Britons of the south would have given the appellation Tranotant to the Country beyond the Stream; and its inbabitants would have been called Tranovanti, Tranovantwyr, and TRANOVANTWYS, which, by an easy corruption, would, by the Romans, be pronounced Trinobantes. This tribe possessed two considerable cities, or fortified places; of which the eminence between the Thames and the Fleet-brook,' the centre of modern London, was the site of one: the other, and most important at that early era, was Camalodunum, now Colchester, in Essex, The Trinobantes were the first to submit to the Roman arms, to which they were induced by intestine divisions, that had originated among the native Princes some years prior to the expeditions of Cæsar. After the complete subjugation of the Island, this county was included in the division named FLAVIA CÆSARIENSIS; and Londinium, or Augusta, now London, became a principal Roman station, though it was not dignified with the name of a colony.

This county derives its name from its relative situation to the three ancient surrounding kingdoms of the East, West, and South, Saxons; of the first of which, that is, East-Sex, or Esser, it a part for about three centuries previous to the dissolution A

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Vol. X.

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