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TABLE OF SIMPLE INTEREST, AT 6 PER CENT.,

So arranged that the interest on any sum may be at once ascertained. Princi 1 Day. 1 Week. 1 Month./1 Year.|| Princi-| 1 Day. 1 Week. 1 Month. 1 Year.

pal. D).c.m. D.c.m. D. c. m. 1.c.m. pal. D.c.m.D.c.m. D.c.m. D. c. m. Cts. 200 0 00 0 0 0 0 10 1 2 Doll.70 0 1 2 0 8 7 0 35 0 4 20 300 0 00

0 0 0 0 10 1 S 80 0 1 3 0 10 0 0 40 0 4 80 400

0 00 0 0/0 0 110 2 4 90 0 1 5 0 11 2 0 45 0 5 10 5010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 210 3 0 1000 1 6 0 12 5 0 50 0 60 6010 0 0/0 0 0 0 0 20 3 G 200 0 3 3 0 25 0 1 0 0 12 0 700 0 0 0 0 0 0 310

3000 4 90 37 5 1 50 0 18 0 8010 0 00 0 0/0 0 30 4 8 4000 6 6 0 50 0 2 0 24 0

9010 0 00 0 1 0 0 4105 4 5000 8 3 0 62 5 2 50 0 30 ) Dolls. 10 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 60 6 01 600 0 10 0 0 75 0 3 0 0 36 )

210 0 010 0 1 0 1 00 120 7000 11 51 O 87 5 3 50 0 42 0 310 0 00 0 210 1 50 18 0 800 0 13 3 1 00 04 00 48 0 40 0 10 0 410 2 0 0 24 0 900 0 14 8 1 12 5 4 50 054 0 50 0 110 0 50 2 50 30 0 1000 0 16 4 1 25 0 5 0 0 60 0 60 0 10 0 6 3 010 36 0 20000 32 9 2 50 0 10 0 0 1200 710 0 10 0 7 0 3 50 42 01 3000 0 49 3 3 75 0 15 00 180 0 810 010 0 910 4 0 0 48 0 40000 65 8 500 0 20 0 0 240 0 90 0 1 0 1 010 4 50 5+ 0 50000 82 2 6 25 0 25 0 0 300 0 1010 0 20 1 1 0 5 00 60 0 6000 0 98 7 7 50 0 30 0 0 3600 2010 0 30 2 5 0 10 01 20 0 7000 1 15 1 8 75 0135 0 0 420 0 300 0 50 3 710 15 01 80 0 8000 1 31 510 00 00 00 480 0 400 0 70 5 00 20

02 40 0 9000 1 48 0 11 25 0 15 0 0/540 0 500 0 80 6 20 25 0 3 000 10000 64 412 50 0 50 0 0 600 0

60'0 1 007 510 30 0/3 60 oll 12000 1 97 3115 00 0.60 0 0 720 0 Where the interest is at the rate of seven per cent., add one sixth to the product, - of eight per cent., add one third, &c. Where at the rate of five per cent., deduct one sixth, - of four per cent., deduct one third, &c.

POST-OFFICE REGULATIONS. (1861.) Letters - A letter not exceeding half an ounce, three cents, pre-paid, under 3000 wiles; but over that distance, ten cents, pre-paid.

“A letter, when conveyed wholly or in part by sea to or from a foreign country, over 2500 miles, 20 cents; and under 2500, 10 cents, except all cases where the postages have been or shall be adjusted at different rates by postal treaty or convention."

Drop letters, one cent. Advertised letters, one cent in addition to regular postage.

Valuable letters may be registered at the office, on payment of regular postage and five cents additional.

Newspapers, Periodicals, Unsealed Circulars, &c., not over 3 oz., 1 ct. each, to any part of the U. States, or ct. if paid quarterly or yearly in advance.

Newspapers, &c., not over one and a half oz., half the above rates, if sent within the state where published.

Newspapers, papers, and pamphlets, not over 16 pages, 8vo, in packages of not less than eight ounces to one address, one half cent an ounce; though, if separate pieces, the postage may be more.

All transient matter to be pre-paid, by stamps.

Books, bound or unbound, not over 4 pounds each, 1 cent an ounce under and 2 cents over 3000 miles ; to be pre-paid.

Weekly newspapers free in the county of publication, when transmitted by mail.

Bills and receipts for payments of money for newspapers may be enclosed in subscribers' papers.

Exchanges between newspaper publishers, for one copy from each office, free.

Newspapers, &c., to be so enclosed that the character can be determined without removing the wrapper ; to have nothing written or printed on the paper or wrapper, beyond the direction, and to contain no enclosure other than the bills or receipts mentioned. - To these rules we would add, always sign your name, and also direct ul! letters, &c., sent by mail, plainly and distinctly; and use the folded sheet, ia pref. erence to envelopes, as this saves separating the post-mark from the letter.

LETTERS NOT PREPAID TO GO TO THE DEAD LETTER OFFICE. The Postmaster General has issued the following important oriler :

“Whereas, by the act of the 3d of March, 1855, the postage upon all letters except such as are entitled to pass free between places in the United States, is required to be prepaid ; and whercas the Department, through courtesy, has hitherto at considerable labor and expense notified the parties addressed, in all instances in which the writers failed to prepay, that their letters would be forwarded on receiving the postage due thereon; and whereas, instead of dininishing, the number of such letters continues to increase, thus showing the omission to prepay is intentional ; it is therefore or lered that from and after the first day of November, 1860, all such unpaid letters te sent to the dead letter office, to be disposed of in like manner as other dead

12

POPULATION OF THE UNITED STATES AND TERRITORIES, In 1860, according to the Eighth Census. The States arranged in order, according

to Free Population, - - with the Square Miles of each State, - the number of Electors and Representatives of each State, and Date of Admission to the Union.

Date of
STATES.
Square Elect-

Admission Free. Slave. Total.
miles.

Reps. ors.

to Union. Blew York,

46,085
35 Original 3,887,542

3,887,542 31 Pennsylvania, 44,000 27 Original 2,906,370

2,906,370 23 Ohio, 39,96+ 23 1802 2,339,599

2,339,599 18 Illinois, 56,105 11 1818 1,711,7531

1,711,753 13 Indiana, 33,809 13 1816 1,350,479

1,350,479 11 Massachusetts, 7,500 13 Original 1,231,065

1,231,065 10 Virginia,

64,000 15 Original 1,105,196 490,887 1,596,083 11 Missouri,

67,380 9 1821 1,058,352 114,900 1,173,317 9 Kentucky,

40,500 12 1792 930,223 225,490 1,165.113 Tennessee,

45,322

1796 834,063 275,784 1,109,847 8 Wisconsin, 53,924 5 1848 775,873

775,873 6 Michigan, 56,243 6 1836 749,112

749,112 6 Iowa,

50,914
1815 674,948

674,948 5 New Jersey, 8,320 7 Original 672,031

672,0:31 5 North Carolina, 43,800 10 Original 661,586 331,081 99-2,667 7 Maine, 32,628 8 1820 628,276

628,276 5 Georgia, 62,000 10 Original

695,097 468,230 1,057,237 Maryland, 13,959 8 Original 569,846 87,188 687,034

5 Alabama,

50,722 9 1819 529,164 435,132 964,296 6 Connecticut, 4,764 6 Original 460,151

460,151 4 Texas, 223,000

1845 420,651 180,388 601,039 California, 188,981 1850 380,015

380,015 3 Louisiana,

46,431 6 1812 376,913 332,520 709,433 Mississippi, 47,151

1817 354,699 436,696 791,395 5 New llampshire, 9,411 5 Original 326,072

326,072 3 Arkansas,

52,198 4 1836 324,323 111,104 435,427 3 Vermunt, 10,212 5 1791 315,116

315, 116 2 South Carolina, 28,200

Original 301,271 402,341 703,812 Rhode Island, 1,310 4 Original 174,621

174,621 1 Minnesota,

83,000
1858 162,0:22

162,0-22 11 Delaware, 2,120 3 Original 110,420 1,798

112,218

1! Kansas,

1861
107,110

107,110 1 Florida, 53,786 3 1845

78,686 61,753

140,439 1 Oregon, 3+1,500 3

1859
52,461

52,464 1 303

27,185,109 3,949,557 31,134,666 233 Dist. of Columbia, 63

71,895 3,181 75,076 Territories. New Mexico, 210,744

93,517 24 93,541 Utah, 188,000

40,266 29 40,295 Colorado, 100,000

34,197

34,197 Nebraska,

28,832 10 28,842 Washington,

..

:::

:::::::

:::::::

:::::::

11,578

11,578 Nevada,

6,857

6,857 Dakotah,

4,839

4,839 27,477,090 3,952,801 31,429,891

The whole number of representatives in Congress is fixed by law at 233, who are apportioned among the States respectively, by dividing the number of the free population of the States, to which, in slaveholding States, three-fifths of the slaves are added, by the number 233, and the product of such division (rejecting all fractions of a unit) shall be the ratio of representation of the several States. But, as the pumber and amount of the fractions among so many dividends would of course, in the aggregate, be sufficient to reduce the number of representatives belor the number specified, it was provided that the whole number should be supplied by assigning to 80 many States having the largest fractions, an additional member each for its traction, until the number 233 members should be assigned to the several States.

TERRITORIES. - The number of territories is now seven, three of which, namely, Colorado, Nevada, and Dakotah, were organized in 1861. Colorado includes parts of Kansas, Nebraska and Eastern Utah. It includes the famous mining regions, Pike's Peak. Nevadah is taken from Western Utah and Northern California ; but the strip of California will not be included within its limits unless that State consents to the transfer. Dakotah was formerly a part of Minnesota territory, but was detached when that territory became a State.

HAYING. We took occasion, last year, to make some extracts from a text-book, or Manual of Agriculture, prepared by George B. Emerson and Charles L. Flint, for the use of schools, under the direction and sanction of the Massachusetts State Board of Agriculture. The following extracts, on the principles and methods of securing the hay crops, so important to the New England farmer, we are permitted to take from the same work:

The hay crop is usually the first of the as rapidly and as uniformly as possible. harvest that requires attention. Before he This may be done by hand with a common can determine the proper time for mow fork, or by a machine called a hay-tedder ing, the farmer must consider for what a light revolving cylinder, set with tines purposes his hay is to be used — whether and drawn by one horse, by means of he is to feed cows in milk, horses and which the grass may be constar #ly stirred working oxen, or young stock with it. and kept in motion, and much time and

If it is to be used for feeding milch cows, labor may be saved. it should be cut earlier than if intended When grass is partially or wholly cured for some other kinds of stock, and at such it may be raked by hand, or by a horsea time and in such a manner as to pre-rake. Raking by hand is easy, but slow, serve its juiciness and leave it as much like and thrifty farmers now generally use the the green grass of the pasture as possible. horse-rake whenever they can. With it

If it is to be fed to cows in milk, and one man and horse can do as much work the farmer wishes to get the greatest quan- as ten men can do in the same time withtity of milk, grass should be cut just be- out it. Ilay cut in the forepoon should be fore coming into blossom. It is then most raked before night, to avoid the dews. juicy, and will therefore produce a greater The time required for curing hay deflow of milk than if allowed to stand longer. pends partly on its ripeness when cut, and If the object is to secure the best quality much on the state of the weather. In of milk, with less regard to quantity, it good weather, if machinery is used, it may be cut in the blossom.

may be cut in the morning, after the dew In feeding to store cattle, the grasses has risen, and dried so as to be put into may be cut when in full blossom. For light cocks early in the afternoon, or be. horses at work, and for fattening cattle, it fore the dewe of evening. A slight openis better just after it has passed out of the ing to the sun for an hour or two the next blossom, and when the seed is said to be day should dry it enough, if it was cut in the milk.

while in blossom, or before. Hay should Grasses attain their full development at be got in during the heat of the day. the time of flowering, and then contain the Grass cured rapidly, and with the least largest quantity of soluble materials, such exposure, is more nutritious than that as starch, gum and sugar ; these, with the cured more slowly, and longer exposed to nitrogenous compounds, which are also the sun. If dried too much it contains most abundant at this time, are of the more useless woody fibre and less nutrihighest value for supplying nutriment to ment. The more succulent and juicy the animals.

hay, the more it is relished by cattle. After flowering, and as the seed forms After the grass has been cut at the propand ripens, the starch, sugar, etc., are er time, the true art of haymaking consists gradually changed into woody fibre, which in curing it just enough to make it fit for is nearly insoluble and innutritious. storing away, and no more. The loss of

This fact is well established, and shows the nutritive substances, which make the that grasses in general should not be al- hay most valuable, is thus stopped at the lowed to stand after the time of flowering. earliest moment. It is as great a mistake There is, indeed, a great deal of nourish- to dry grass too much, as to let it stand ment in the ripe seed, but not enough to too long before cutting. make up for the loss in the stalk and If the hay has not been perfectly dried, leaves, if the mowing is put off till the and there is danger that it may heat in seed is ripe. Grasses fully ripe will make the mow, it is well to have alternate layhay little better than straw.

ers of the new bay and straw or old hay. Grass is cut either by hand with the In this way the heating may be prevented, common scythe, or by the mowing-ma- and the straw or old hay will be so far flachine. With the former a good mower vored and improved as to be relished by will go over an acre a day. With the lat- stock of all kinds. If there is much reater, on smooth land, two horses and one son for apprehension, four quarts of salt to man will mow at the rate of an acre an the ton may be sprinkled in. hour, or from ten to twelve acres a day, Experience has shown that hay properly without over-exertion. Besides mowing dried is not likely to be injured by its own 80 much faster, the machine also spreads juices alone. If it has been exposed to the grass evenly, saving the labor of doing rain, it should never be put into the mow it by hand. It also enables the farmer to until it has been thoroughly dried. cut all his grass nearer the proper time, Clover should be cut immediately after and he is not obliged to let a part of it blossoming. It should not be exposed to stand till it is too ripe.

the scorching sun, but after being partially After being cut, the grass should be fre-dried it should be forked up into cocks, quently spread and turned, so as to dry and left to cure in this position.

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