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NEW

SERIES.

HILLARD'S READERS,

CONSISTING OF

66

THE PRIMER, or FIRST READER, Illustrated. THE SECOND READER, THE THIRD READER, THE FOURTH READER, THE INTERMEDIATE READER, THE FIFTH READER. THE SIXTH READER. The higher books of this New Series were first published in the summer da 1863. Since that time they have been introduced into the Public Schools of Boston, New York, Chicago, Portland, and of many other important places. The lower books, for Primary Schools, consisting of " The Pemer, or First Reader," “ The Second Reader," and “ The Third Reader,” were first published in September, 1864. They are printed with GOOD TYPE, are BEAUTIFULLY ILLUSTRATED, and the selection of pieces is VARIED ANI ENTERTAINING,

TESTIMONIALS. These testimonials for the Grammar School Series were given before the new Primary Readers were published.

From JOHN A. ANDREW, Gov. of Mass. I think the work (the Sixth Reader) has been executed with a single epe na the promotion of general culture, good English style, the introduction of your minds to good writers, and of teaching them, while pupils at school, the greatij neglected art of reading well.

From JOHN G. WHITTIER.
I have no hesitation in commending the series to public patronage.

From JOHN D. PHILBRICK, Superintendent of Public Schools of Boston, From present indications, I feel warranted in saying, that reading in our Grammar Schools will be advanced during the year twenty-five per cent. in consequence of the introduction of this series,

From Rev. A. L. STONE, D.D., Pastor of Park Street Church, Boston. The volumes are aglow with wit, humor, eloquence, pathos, and the purest and loftiest sentiments of patriotism, humanity, and religion,

From Rev. R. H. NEALE, D. D., Pastor of First Baptist Church, Bo m. They evince thorough scholarship, extensive and accurate information, and a perfect mastery of the subject in hand, From Prof. GEO. HOWLAND, Principal of Public High School, Chicago, IU.

I consider Hillard's “Sixth Reader," now in use in my school, by far the best Reader that has been presented to the educational public.

From G. F. PHELPS, Principal of Eaton School, New Haven, Conn. The Introduction, by Prof. Bailey, is the most practical treatise on Elocution I have ever seen. It marks a new era in the teaching of reading.

Teachers and School Committees are invited to address the publishers. Ma vorable terms will be given for introduction. BREWER & TILESTON,

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Being BISSEXTILE or LEAP YEAR, and (until July 4) 92d of American

IŅdependence.
FITTED FOR BOSTON, BUT WILL ANSWER FOR ALL THE NEW ENGLAND STATES.
Containing, besides the large number of Astronomical Calculations,
and the Farmer's Calendar for every month in

the year, a great variety of
NEW, USEFUL, AND ENTERTAINING MATTER.

ESTABLISHED IN 1793,

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Thou art around us; Thy robe of light

Touches the gracefully waving tree,
Turning to jewels the tears of night,

And making the buds unfold to Thee.

H. F. GOULD.

BOSTON:
PUBLISHED BY BREWER & TILESTON.

Sold by the Booksellers and Traders throughout New England. (Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1867. by BREWER & TILESTON, in the Clerk's Office of the District Court of the District of Massachusetts.) 200

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TO PATRONS AND CORRESPONDENTS. The tides were calculated as usual, but it was suggested by some who have frequent occasion to use them, that it would be more convenient to have them reduced to eyen quarter hours; and this has been done, and the tides given in fractions of an hour, instead of minutes, as heretofore. It will be seen that this can vary but seven minutes in any case from the computed time. Thus, if the computed time gives the high tide at 5 hours 53 minutes, it is given in the columns as 6 o'clock. If it is 5 hours 52 minutes, it is given as 57 hours, or a quarter before 6 o'clock.

The times of meeting of the County Commissioners of the various counties are given by themselves, as a matter of greater convenience, on page 5, instead of the calendar pages as herctofore. We trust the change will be acceptable to our read

A list of the Registers in Bankruptcy in New England, is also given on the same page,

Our acknowledgments are due to numerous correspondents for answers to problems and suggestions on many points, all of which are cheerfully received and duly considered. We regret that want of space compels us to omit a more formal ac knowledgment, by giving their names in full. They all have our thanks for their favors, and we trust they will continue them.

The motto on the title-page, and the stanzas on the calendar pages, are selected from the sprightly pen of Miss HANNAH F. GOULD. The new law relating to STAMP DUTIES, an official copy of which is given on pages 42 and 43, will be extremely convenient for reference.

All communications should be addressed to me, care of the Publishers, and sent previous to July 1st, when they will receive prompt attention. We can only say that we offer many times the value of our little manual, and that “no efforts shall be spared to make the almanac useful, pleasing, and worthy the continued patronage of its numerous friends.

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AGRICULTURAL EXHIBITIONS.
The Agricultural Exhibitions of Massachusetts, for 1868, will begin as follows:-
Essex,
Sept. 29th.

Hampden, at Springfield, Oct. 6th.
Middlesex, at Concord, Oct. 1st.

Hampden East, at Palmer, Oct. 13th,
Middlesex North, at Lowell, Sept. 24th. Franklin, at Greenfield, Sept. 24th.
Middlesex South, at Framingham, Sept. Berkshire, at Pittsfield, Oct. 6th.
22d.

Housatonic, it Gt. Barrington, Sept. 30th.
Union, at Blandford,

Hoosac Valley, at North Adams, Sept. 22.
Worcester, at Worcester, Sept. 17th. Norfolk, at Dedham, Sept. 17th.
Worcester West, at Barre, Sept. 24th. Hingham, at Hingham,
Worcester North, at Fitchburg, Sept. 29th. Bristol, at Taunton, Oct. 6th.
Worcester North-West, at Athol,

Bristol Central, at Myrick's, Sept. 17th.
Worcester South, at Sturbridge, Oct. 1st. Plymouth, at Bridgewater, Sept. 24th.
Worcester So.-East, at Milford, Sept.29th. Marshfield, at Marshfield,
Hampshire, Franklin, and Hampden, at Barnstable, at Barnstable, Oct. 13th.
Northampton, Oct. 1st.

Nantucket, at Nantucket, Sept. 29th.
Hampshire, at Amherst, Sept. 29th. Martha's Vineyard, at West Tisbury,
Highland, at Middlefield, Sept. 10th. Oct. 20th.

881

CATTLE MARKET,

MARKET DAYS.

at Cambridge,

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ECLIPSES, &c., FOR 1868. THERE will be two Eclipses this year, both of the Sun; and a Transit of MÉRCURY over the Sun's disk.. I.-AN ANNULAR ECLIPSE OF THE SUN, February 23d, visible to South America,

and portions of Europe and Africa. II. - A TOTAL ECLIPSE OF THE SUN, August 18th, visible to Australia, and

portions of Africa and Asia. III. - A TRANSIT OF MERCURY, November 5th, visible to Asia, Africa, Australia,

and a portion of South America. The longitudes of the following places are counted west from Greenwich, while the differences of time refer to Boston. (+) added to, (-) subtracted from, Boston time. Mace. N. Lat. W. Lon. Diff., Place.

N. Lat. W. Lon., Diff Augusta, Me. 44° 191 | 69° 50' + 5 Boston, Mass.. 42° 21' 71° 3' Eastport, 44 54 66 56 +17, Worcester,“

42 16 71 48 -3 Bangor,

44 48 68 47 9 Springfield,“ 42 6 72 36 Portland, 43 40 70 15 3 Pittsfield,

42 27 73 16 9 Brunswick,“ 43 53 69 55 5. Hartford, Conn.. 41 46 72 41 7 Concord, N. H. 43 12 71 29 2 New Haven," 41 18 72 55 7 Dover, 43 13 70 54+

Newport, R.I.. 41 29 71 18 Montpelier, Vt. 44 17 72 36 – 6: New York, N.Y.. 40 43

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NAMES AND CHARACTERS OF THE PLANETS. @ The Sun.

Mars.

h Saturn. DO The Moon.

Jupiter.

H Uranus.
Mercury.
The Earth,

Neptune.
Venus.

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* Vesta.

Juno.
Pallas,
Ceres.

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May 31

NAMES AND CHARACTERS OF THE ASPECTS. o Conjunction, or in the same degree. Opposition, or 180 degrees. * Sextile, 60 degrees.

Dragon's Head, or Ascending Node. Ò Quartile, 90 degrees.

Dragon's Tail, or Descending Node. A Trine, 120 degrees.

NAMES AND CHARACTERS OF THE SIGNS OF THE ZODIAC. 1. p Aries, head. 5. R Leo, heart.

9. I Sagittarius, thighs. 2. 8 Taurus, neck.

6. VR Virgo, belly.

10. V Capricornus, knees. 3. Gemini, arms.

7. Libra, reins.

11. Aquarius, legs. 4. Io Cancer, breast. 8. m Scorpio, secreta /

12. # Pisces, feet.
CHRONOLOGICAL CYCLES FOR 1868.
Dominical Letters,
ED Lunar Cycle or

Roman Indiction, 11

7 Epact, 6 Golden Number,

Julian Period,

6581 Solar Cycle

1

MOVABLE FEASTS AND FASTS FOR 1868. Septuagesima Sunday, Feb. 9 Good Friday, April 10 | Holy Thursday, May 21 Shrove Sunday, 23 Easter Sunday,

12 Whit Sunday, Ash Wednesday, 26 Low Sunday,

19 Trinity Sunday, June 7 First Sunday in Lent, Mar. 1 | Rogation Sunday, May 17 | Advent Sunday, Nov. 29

DEFINITIONS. (Continued from last year.) LENT. - The quadrigesimal fast, a fast of forty days, observed by the Roman Catholic and some other churches, in commemoration of our Saviour's fasting in the wilderness. It begins on Ash Wednesday and continues until Easter.

Good FRIDAY. - The name given to the anniversary of our Saviour's crucifixion, being the third day, or the Friday before Easter, which is held as a solemn fast by a great part of the Christian world.

EASTER SUNDAY. - The day on which the resurrection of Christ is commemorated; the third day after Good Friday, being the first Sunday after the full moon which happens upon, or next after, the 21st day of March, corresponding in season to the Passover of the Jews.

Low SUNDAY. - The first Sunday after Easter: so called because celebrated as a feast, but of a lower degree than Easter-day.

ROGATION SUNDAY. - Rogation is a public supplication; a litany. Rogation Sunday is the second Sunday before Whitsunday, and Rogation Week, the second week before Whitsunday, in which there are three Rogation days, Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday next before Ascension-day, or Holy Thursday.

HOLY THURSDAY:- Ascension-day, the 39th day after Easter Sunday; the next Thursday but one before Whitsunday: a festival in commemoration of Christ's ascension.- Worcester's Quarto Dictionary.

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