The Best Letters of Lord Chesterfield: Letters to His Son, and Letters to His Godson

Első borító
A. C. McClurg & Company, 1902 - 302 oldal

Részletek a könyvből

Mit mondanak mások - Írjon ismertetőt

Nem találtunk ismertetőket a szokott helyeken.

Kiválasztott oldalak

Tartalomjegyzék

Más kiadások - Összes megtekintése

Gyakori szavak és kifejezések

Népszerű szakaszok

166. oldal - Clarendon paints as possessing beyond all his contemporaries " a head to contrive, a tongue to persuade, and a hand to execute...
136. oldal - This flapper is likewise employed diligently to attend his master in his walks, and upon occasion to give him a soft flap on his eyes ; because he is always so wrapped up in cogitation, that he is in manifest danger of falling down every precipice and bouncing his head against every post, and in the streets, of jostling others, or being jostled himself, into the kennel.
191. oldal - I do not love thee, Dr. Fell, The reason why I cannot tell; But this I know, and know full well, I do not love thee. Dr. Fell.
244. oldal - tis all a cheat; Yet, fool'd with hope, men favour the deceit; Trust on, and think to-morrow will repay; To-morrow's falser than the former day; Lies worse; and while it says we shall be blest With some new joys, cuts off what we possest.
33. oldal - You should not only have attention to everything, but a quickness of attention, so as to observe, at once, all the people in the room, their motions, their looks, and their words, and yet without staring at them, and seeming to be an observer. This quick and unobserved observation is of infinite advantage in life, and is to be acquired with care ; and, on the contrary, what is called absence, which is...
163. oldal - The late Lord Chancellor Cowper's strength, as an orator, lay by no means in his reasonings, for he often hazarded very weak ones. But such was the purity and elegancy of his style, such the propriety and charms of his elocution, and such the gracefulness of his action, that he never spoke without universal applause : the ears and the eyes gave him up the hearts and the understandings of the audience.
129. oldal - There is a certain dignity of manners absolutely necessary, to make even the most valuable character either respected or respectable. Horse-play, romping, frequent and loud fits of laughter, jokes, waggery, and indiscriminate familiarity, will sink both merit and knowledge into a degree of contempt.
146. oldal - ... people, as protection and obedience are between kings and subjects; whoever in either case violates that compact, justly forfeits all advantages arising from it. For my own part, I really think, that, next to the consciousness of doing a good action, that of doing a civil one is the most pleasing; and the epithet which I should covet the most, next to that of Aristides, would be that of well-bred.
122. oldal - Dress yourself fine, where others are fine; and plain where others are plain; but take care always that your clothes are well made, and fit you, for otherwise they will give you a very awkward air.
131. oldal - Frivolous curiosity about trifles, and a laborious attention to little objects, which neither require nor deserve a moment's thought, lower a man; who from thence is thought (and not unjustly) incapable of greater matters. Cardinal de Retz, very...

Bibliográfiai információk