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THE FIFTH DIALOGUE.

In the last dialogue you have some account of the conaition the young gentleman formerly mentioned was reduced to, in a letter to his sister, dated from Cambray, where he was under cure of his wounds.

It seems his extravagance had reduced him to the last extremity; and having had his arm cut off, and falling into a long fit of sickness after it, though he was exchanged by virtue of the cartel for exchange of prisoners, and so had his freedom, yet he could not be removed, and was at last obliged to sell his commission; after which, seeing himself reduced to great extremities, and the utmost misery, even of wanting bread, being in his view, he wrote a second letter to his father; which being brought by a person who gave a particular account of his condition, moved his father to take compassion on him, and relieve him.

His letter to his father was thus :

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“ As I have little reason to expect any relief from you, 80 duty ought to bave moved me not to have given you the affliction of knowing my condition. Perhaps, however, while you may be moved with my disasters, it may be some satisfaction to you to see, that he who went away without your blessing is brought to the necessity of seeking to you for his bread. If it be your pleasure, that I shall perish here in misery, and friendless, I am ready to submit to the sentence from your mouth, as a just punishment; but if you have so much concern for my life, as to cause me to be brought over, that I may die in my native country, the bearer will acquaint you, bow such undeserved bounty will be received by, &c.”

The tender compassionate father, though he resented his son's treatment of him deeply enough, and steadily adhered to the resolution of never receiving him into his family, un. less he acknowledged his first crime, viz. of withstanding the reformation of his father's house ; yet being by no means obliged by that resolution, not to relieve him in distress, or to let him starve in a strange country, having inquired into the particulars of his circumstances, from the gentleman who brought over the letter, and understanding by him, that bis son was reduced to the utmost distress, he immediately remitted money over to a Dutch merchant at Lisle, with orders to give bim present subsistence, and to bring him from Cambray thither, in order to his being sent over to England; all which the said merchant effectually performed, and the poor reduced gentleman arrived at London soon after.

It was the very same day of his arrival when he caused bis father to have notice, that he was coming to lay himself at his door; but the father, though he had relieved him, and designed to take care that he should not want, yet judging it needful to let him know that his resentment had been very just, and that he was to be satisfied further, with relation to things past, before he could be restored to the state of an eldest son, if ever that was to be done at all, gave him the mortification of signifying to him by a messenger, that he was not to be admitted to see his father, or to come into his house yet; but that he was to go to such a place, not far off, where a lodging was provided for him.

This afflicted him extremely: at first it threw him into a violent passion, expostulating with the messenger, in such words as these. What! has my father brought me thus far, but to trample on my misery, and to make bis resentment sink the deeper? or has he brought me like a criminal to the place of execution, thus, as he may think, to do justice upon me! Why has he not suffered me to perish where I was, rather than come bither to die, with the

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THE FIFTH DIALO. a long fit of sicknes wring his arm shot off, and being re

sers door, yet he would not take bim in, but

wted him, and he broke out into this expression

ad him eliver his s; and, so sceive him, and oman go on,

and in In the last dialogue you have s aition the young gentleman fr

ý by bis father's door ; duced to, in a letter to his

grief, even into an agony where he was under curer

; when, in that very moment, It seems his extravag vind, which he had related to his extremity; and havip down in the first dialogue of this virtue of the cart

abroad, and brought over, though he his freedom, y obliged to so

to a neighbour's house, &c. reduced te

this revolved apon his thoughts, it immediof wantir ter to now see that nothing befals us without the determi

of that sovereign Power that guides and governs gave

world : this was so long ago represented to me

How exactly is every step of it come to pass me! God is just, and it is my part to submit!" "This quieted bis mind for some time, and he went on to

bouse which his father bad appointed him, where he found the servant, who, as he had said, went before, who belped him out, for he was so weak he could hardly go, and, coming into a chamber provided for him, fetching a deep sigh he threw himself on the bed, without speaking a word; and in this condition he remained all that night, and part of the next day, nobody coming to bim but the people of the house, who were, however, directed to attend him, and supply him with necessaries.

In the evening he heard a coach stop at the door, and soon after a lady coming up stairs, who was brought up into his chamber, and whom he presently knew to be his sister. She found him very weak sitting in a chair by the

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THE FAMILY INSTRUCTOR.

him into his fans, enough, and stead whered sionate father, though he resented his

of withstandao

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aning his head upon his hand, and his elbow op a table od by him, his eyes

fixed on the ground; his counthe last degree dejected, pale, and thin; and, in ? a spectre as any thing that is real flesh and supposed to be. As she came forward into

ed up his eyes, and said only this word, ,

..d have risen up, but had not strength. u to have embraced him ; but when she saw

was frighted and amazed, and sat down over ut him at some distance, being ready to swoon away. the first she could hardly be convinced it was really her brother and when she was satisfied of that, the very seeing him in that condition struck her with such grief, that she could not speak a word to bim for a great while. Being recovered a little, my dear brother! said she, and would have gone on, but she burst out into tears. However, these transports, which the surprise of seeing him in such a condition might very well be supposed to work in so near a relation, being a little over, they began to discourse a little together; and after the usual questions concerning his health, and the proper remedies to be used to recover his strength, and the like, the following dialogue contains the substance of their discourse :

Sist. Dear brother, but what makes you. so dejected? and why have you lost your courage so much at your disaster? I hope, with taking care of yourself, and proper remedies being used, you may recover. But if your spirits are sunk, you will fall under the weight of your own melancholy, and be lost without remedy.

Bro. Dear sister, not all my disasters, not the loss of my arm, or the cruel operations of the surgeons; not the baving wasted my estate; not my being reduced to want of bread; not all that has hefallen me, or that could befal me in the world, has ever been able to sink my spirits, and cast me so low as this part of my tragedy. Sist. What part, brother?

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more affliction and reproach? The messenger told him his business was not to dispute with him, but to deliver his message ; that he had no farther instructions; and, so giving the coachman directions where to go, he told the poor gentleman he would go before to receive him, and took his leave.

The unhappy gentleman bid the coachman go on, and in a little time he found himself passing by his father's door ; this struck him with inexpressible grief, even into an agony of shame, anger, and despair ; when, in that very moment, his dream came into his mind, which he had related to his sister, and which is set down in the first dialogue of this part, viz. bow that having his arm shot off, and being relieved by his father abroad, and brought over, though be came to his father's door, yet he would not take him in, but Lad ordered him to a neighbour's house, &c.

As soon as this revolved upon his thoughts, it immediately quieted him, and he broke out into this expression“Well, I now see that nothing befals us without the determinate will of that sovereign Power that guides and governs the whole world : this was so long ago represented to me in a dream. How exactly is every step of it come to pass upon me! God is just, and it is my part to submit!"

This quieted bis mind for some time, and he went on to the house which his father bad appointed him, where he found the servant, who, as he had said, went before, who helped him out, for he was so weak he could hardly go, and, coming into a chamber provided for him, fetching a deep sigh he threw himself on the bed, without speaking a word; and in this condition he remained all that night, and part of the next day, nobody coming to bim but the people of the house, who were, however, directed to attend him, and supply him with necessaries.

In the evening he heard a coach stop at the door, and soon after a lady coming up stairs, who was brought up into his chamber, and whom he presently knew to be bis sister. She found him very weak sitting in a chair by the

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