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CONSTITUTION

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OF

ENGLAND;

IN WHICH IT IS COMPARED
BOTH WITH THE REPUBLICAN FORM OF GOVERNMENT,

AND THE OTHER MONARCHIES IN EUROPE.

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Ponderibus librata suis.-Ovid. Met. lib. i. V, 13.

LONDON:

PRINTED FOR THE PROPRIETORS OF THE

ENGLISH CLASSICS,

BY J. F. DOVE, ST. JOHN'S SQUARE.

1826.

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CONTENTS.

Page

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9

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BOOK I.

A survey of the various powers included in the English constitution,

and of the laws both in civil and criminal cases.

Chap. I. Causes of the liberty of the English nation.-Reasons

of the difference between the government of England and that

of France.--In England, the great power of the crown, under the

Norman kings, created a union between the nobility and the

21

11. A second advantage England had over France:-it formed one

undivided state

30

III. The subject continued

IV. Of the legislative power

V. Of the executive power

53

VI. The boundaries which the constitution has set to the royal pre-

rogative

54

vil. The same subject continued

57

VIII. New restrictions

60

ix. Of private liberty, or the liberty of individuals

67

X. On the law that is observed in England in regard to civil

74

XI. The subject continued.-The courts of equity

86

XII. Of criminal justice

. 95

XIII. The subject continued

XIV. The subject concluded.--Laws relative to imprisonment . 112

BOOK II.

A view of the advantages of the English government, and of the rights

and liberties of the

people: and a confirmation, by reference to facts,

of the principles stated in the work.

M Chap. I. Some advantages peculiar to the English constitution.-1.

116

11. The subject concluded.--The executive power is more easily

confined when it is one

D

HII. A second peculiarity-The division of the legislative power 128

IV. A third advantage peculiar to the English government. The

business of proposing laws lodged in the hands of the people . 133

V. In which an inquiry is made, whether it would be an advantage

to public liberty, that the laws should be enacted by the votes of

the peo at large

VI. Advantages that accrue to the people from appointing repre-

sentatives

147

Chop.

Page

VII. The subject continued.-The advantages that accrue to the

people from their appointing representatives are very incon-

siderable, unless they also entirely trust their legislative authority

vil. The subject concluded.-'Effects that have resulted in the

English government, from the people's power being completely

delegated to their representatives

ix. A farther disadvantage of republican governments.

The

people are necessarily betrayed by those in whom they trust. 155

X. Fundamental difference between the English government and

the governments just described. In England, all executive au-

thority is placed out of the hands of those in whom the people

trust.-Usefulness of the power of the crown

139

xi. The powers which the people themselves exercise. -Élection

of members of parliament

XI!. The subject continued.-Liberty of the press

XIII. The subject continued

XIV. Right of resistance

XV. Proofs, drawn from facts, of the truth of the principles laid

down in the present work.-1. The peculiar manner in which re-

volutions bave always been concluded in England

182

XVI. Second difference. The manner after which the laws for

the liberty of the subject are executed in England

. 192

XVII. A more inward view of the English government than has

hitherto been offered to the reader in the course of this work.-

Very essential differences between the English monarchy, as a

monarchy, and all those with which we are acquainted

Second part of the same chapter

XVIII, How far the examples of nations who have tost their li-

berty are applicable to England

XIX. A few additional

thoughts on the attempts that at particular

times may be made to abridge the power of the crown, and some

of the dangers by which such attempts may be attended . 287

XX. A few additional observations on the right of taxation, which

is lodged in the hands of the representatives of the people.

What kind of danger this right may be exposed to

275

XXI. Conclusion.-

A few words on the nature of the divisions

that take place in England

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