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wool and mutton, for the best land and driest climates.' I am well aware that the introduction of Lincolnshire longwools has been attempted in very many districts of this kingdom, and also in various districts in Ireland, but without uniform success, and in some cases it has been a total failure. It is said that both the west of England as well as Ireland are unsuitable, chiefly because of excess of moisture. The sheep cannot abide such continuous rains. It is also said that the south of England, and other warm districts, are unsuitable, owing to too much heat; that the wool speedily degenerates and becomes short and “mossy." In other distriets, where the elimate is not unsuitable, it is said the land is not good enough for them. It is also said they are bad breeders and bad sucklers; that the hoggets are tender and difficult to winter; that this class of sheep consume so much food; that they thrive slowly; that their mutton is of inferior quality. These and other like objections are raised. I will en. deavor, briefly, to set aside many of these objections. First, climate. It is unquestionable that continuous rains do not agree with the satisfactory and safe progress of longwooled sheep-at least such as have an open

staple. It requires the close set skin of a Southdown to withstand such · wet. There is, however, a class of sheep, which is growing into favor

with many Lincolnshire breeders, that approximate considerably towards the closer set skins of the Cotswold and Kents, not to say Downs: these I believe would thrive well in any wet, variable, or cold climate; and yet their fleeces, under good management, would yield good lustre wool. In the warm districts, I believe the open skins and lighter wools of the north of the county would be suitable, and might be introduced with profit. The fleece would be heavier than from the Leicester, and would yield lustre wool of an excellent quality, without a tendency to turn "mossy." As to the quality of the land and inferiority of herbage being objectionable, I would in refutation instance the Lincolnshire wold and heath dis. tricts. Within my memory I'may venture to say that for tens of thousands of acres together the annual produce did not exceed three or four couples of rabbits per acre; now they are producing magnificent sheep in almost as many couples, and sheep's wool instead of rabbits' skins. Take the Cotswold district. It is not much richer, and yet it has long produced still larger sheep of beautiful form and character. It is only a question of management. As to their breeding qualities, I would say that they are not so prolific as some of the short-wooled sheep, nor are the ewes such good sucklers; but the yield of lambs raised in average seasons is about one-third " pairs," the rest "singles.” They are not more trouble or ex. pense in wintering than other kinds, nor are the casualties greater. As consumers, it has been repeatedly proved that, taking into consideration the value of mutton and wool produced within a given period, few kinds of sheep can compare with them, and the quality of mutton is exceedingly good. It is certainly large in its proportions as butchers' meat, but no mutton can compare with it in the fineness of its lean meat, although not close-grained, and the quantity of lucious gravy it produces. I might fur. ther instance some extraordinary weights to which individual sheep of this breed have attained, which I take almost at random. No. 1, Mr. Clarke's of Canwick, two wether sheep, weight, 261 and 250 pounds respectively. Mr. Dawson's, of Witheal, No. 1, a three-shearer, 386 pounds; No. 2, two-shearer, weight 364 pounds; No. 3, shearling, 284 pounds. Mr. John Clarke's ewe, exhibited at Smithfield Club and the Newcastle meeting, 262 pounds.. Mr. Coke, near Lynn, has at various periods exhibited many scores of this breed, which have averaged from 50 to 75

pounds per quarter. Mr. Plowright, near Spalding, has throughout many ; years shown, in his regular business sales, many hundreds of two-shear

wether sheep to weigh from 30 to 45 pounds per quarter, and at this market, like specimens may be seen on almost every market day. And no doubt specimens of this breed will be exhibited at the new Agricultural Hall, to which I with pleasure refer. I would only now further observe that this breed is exciting great attention on the continent, and many breeders are introducing them on a small scale. Of course these considerations should induce every breeder of these longwools to renew his ex ertions to keep up their high character.

On page 519 of the Ohio State Agricultural Report for 1862 will be found a list of the principal flocks of Merinos and their grades. The law limiting the size of the report did not permit the insertion of the following tables; they are therefore presented here.

i FRENCH MERINOS AND THEIR GRADES.

For the history of the French Merinos see page 479 Ohio Agricultural Report for 1862.

- ATHENS COUNTY.

Name and post-office addrebel 1. of the owner of the flock.

Bucks.
Ewes.

Quality of Who commenced When and where pa

sheep. the lock. rents were obtained.

i James . Tibbles, Lottridge. 21 70 Fr. Merino.. Geo. Welkes..... L. Erie & Wash.co. Pa zJames Dew, Trimble .......131 751..do........ 1835, J. D....... 1835, Athens, Ohio.

BELMONT COUNTY. 3[Joa. Johnson, St. Clairsville.... / 100Fr. Merino.......

CO-YAHOGA COUNTY.

Name and post-office address

of the owner of the flock.

Bucks.
Ewes.

Quality of Who commenced When and where par

sheep. the flock, |rents were obtained

........ Penn.

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4 E. Gibson, North Royalton .... 70 Full Fr. Meri.. 5.J. J. Bigelow, Parma....... 136 640 Half...

..........Pa, Ia, and 0. ......COSHOCTON COUNTY, 61Wm. & Cyrus Elder, Warsaw.) 61 100 Full Fr. Meri.l.... 7 Robert Darling,

2 1401..do........J. Stevens... 8Wm. Crouch,

./ 6200..do........ Wheeler.....Ohio , 9 John Taylor, ; ... .. 3 150..do........

Penn.. ini 10 John J. Hays,

11 156..do........ Wm. M. Hays.... " IilIsaac Mitchell, Laings ...... | 41. 1521............ J1868, M. Boggs... Belmont co., O.

FULTON COUNTY. 12 A. R. Shute, A. J., Fulton co. 1 401 Fr. Merino. A. R. S........... 13 Owen Taylor, Winameg ... If 50..do.coco...........

GEAUGA COUNTY. 14/Stephen Walden, Middlefield 1 11. 45|1 Ft. Merino. (1860, S. W......|N. Y.

GALLIA COUNTY.

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15 A. Barton, Kyger .......... 81 2004 Fr. Merino.l................ 16)M, Titus ....*******

40)..do...

GUERNSEY COUNTY. 17]T. G. Brown, Londerry..... | 8| 100|1 Fr. Merino.IT. G. B......, Washington com, PA

GREENE COUNTY, 18|M. Brownlee, Xenia ........| || 2014 Fr. Merino..................|Clark co., O.

.. . vs LOGAN COUNTY. 19|Asa Brown, Zanesfield......1 51 611) Fr. Merino. 1856, Z. Brown .. Addison, Vermont

LAKE COUNTY. 2010has. Lockwood, Madison... h 404 Fr. Merino.l................]Painesville. 21 F. Benjamin,

... 1 60.. do. ...in.l.... 23 Lewis Bandall,

..... 35)..do.............

MUSKINGUM COUNTY. 24/W.T. Talley, Rural Dale....1 21 60|Full Fr. Meri. Jones, V......... \Imported.

MONROE COUNTY, 26 A. T. Shotwell, Antioch...

el 15013 the Merino IBrady & Baky...{Brooks co., Va. . 26 Absalom Martin, " ..... 21 1500. do......4. M..........Brady, VA , in

WAK

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MORROW COUNTY.

Name and post office address 1 of the owner of the flock.

Bucke.

Ewes.

Quality of Who commenced When and where pa

sheep. the flock. rents were obtained.

Damar

27 E. Weatherly, Chesterville .. 20 150 Fr. Merino , 28 Jerry Coleman,

50 + Fr. Merino.l....... 29 w. . Nye,

301 do..... 30 D. Miles,

63 do......... 31a. King,

81 Merino..............

SUMMIT COUNTY. 32 Jas. Chamberlain, Tallmadgel 31 100jf Fr. Merino........ ..ovi... Vermont.

TRUMBULL COUNTY. 33|Josiah Hine, Johnstonville .. 2 751 Fr. Merino (1840, J.A........(1840, Johnston. 34 Nirum Hine,

21 501..do........

J1850, N. &....... 1850, 35 Henry Long, Hubbard........ 150..do............. 36 H. Green,

1151..do... 3713. Daughton, " ........ 3001..do...

"......

UNION COUNTY.' 38[A. A. Woodworth, M. Centre. 9 4004 Fr. Merino. A. A.' W........./Vt. and France. 39|J. R. Galloway, Irvin Station 8 2001.do........J. R. G.......... Vermont. 40/R. D. Reece, Milford Centre. / 7 300 .do........R. D. R......... Vt. and France. 41 J. & E. Burnham, “ 4 904 to full .. .. 1851, J. & E. B..." 42/Wm. Harvard, Irvin Station.J10 200 Half.. 43|Jas. Miller,

..10 4001..do ........M..... ..... Vermont. 44 Nathan Howard, M. Centre..l 8l 1351 to full..... /1850, N. H......1849, Bingham, Vt.

VINTON COUNTY. 46fFrancis Strong, Wilkesville.. 27 2754 Fr. Merino.11860, F. S.... ... Bucks, Pa. 46(J. Cobb, Salem Centre...... | 6|| 270..do........ 1858, J. C....... Bucks, Vt. 47|Jas. Titus, Rutland, Meigs co. 5) 350..do........(1859, H. Titus ... 48 Seth Paire,

../ 1001..do........11863, S. P.......West Van

WILLIAMS COUNTY. 49, Moses H. London, Montpelier(101 1404 Fr. Merino. 1858, M. H. L....Mass. and Vermont. 50 John Bortoo, West Unity ... 71 250..do........|1858, J. B.......Vermont, 51 T.C. Chander, 1 ... 2 96 s do...............iii.co... 52 Ansalan Jones, 53 S. Snider, " " ... 4 100 do.............:::::...... 54 H. Opdyke, Montpelier ...

.....Jewett & Morse ..1858, Vermont 65 Jacob Ň. Hester, Pulaski... 4 75 Half........................Lorain co., O. 56 Wm. Ayres, West Unity..... 21 901..do........East part State ..!

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WARREN COUNTY. 57, Andrew Spence, Butlerville . 11.... Fr. Merino (1861.. na Maine 58 Peter Boyd, Lebanon..... 14 250 1 do....... 1854, C. Holloway Maine, 59 Joseph Mosher, Waynesville ./33 50 Full .......11850, J. M......./Vermont.

WYANDOT COUNTY.

61/Wm. Betxer,'Belle Vernon : 190) 90. Hall......../1850, W. B......: Ohio.

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WASHINGTON COUNTY. 62]Jas. Lawton, Barlow........34 7511 Fr. Merino. I................ Vermont

No. 5.—My operations in sheep for the past fifteen years have been quite large. And having experimented on the different kinds, I now am prepared to say that a cross between the old French sheep and the native American do produce the most profit to sheep growers. In this cross I have no foot rot; a medium grade of wool, with heavy fleece, say from four to seven pounds; and they are decidedly the best for fattening. Yours truly,

J. J. BRYSTOW. I

No. 15.- In the fall of 1845 I bought a few owes, of what is called the Black Top Merino, very fine, indeed ; and about six years ago I bought a French buck, his wool being long and fine. The sheep raised since I bought the French buck are said to be the best wool sheep in the country. My flock number 350 sheep, about 100 of which are coarse. Yours in haste, .

A. BARTON.

No, 17.— I commenced with a small lot of the Wells & Dickison ewes, of Steubenville, purchased them of David 'Buchanan, of Washington county, Pennsylvania. I commenced my flock 35 years since, and have never made a change, only by change of bucks, and selling off the old ones. I purchased a Black Top buck the same time I purchased my ewes. Afterwards I purchased a buck from a sheep man, or his agent, of Washington county, Pennsylvania, of the same stock of sheep-Black Top Merino; I think the owners name was McGiffin. After many years I crossed with a French buck, sent into our neighborhood by a man in the north. western part of Virginia; his name was Beekey. I have not purchased a sheep for the last 25 years, having raised all that I have kept, or have now. I have raised from 75 to 120 lambs every year, and our flock has ranged in number from 250 to 450; bave now 220, the finest I have had for the last 15 years. .

T. G. BROWN."

No. 36.-In addition to the list given in table I have about 50 sheep, the progeny a full blooded French buck and the common native ewes. These sheep are not quite as fine wool as the French and Spanish; are somewhat larger, and shear as much wool as the others; for domestic use are better than the others, are all very hardy and stand the winter better than the native sheep. - .

Yours truly, ; . i, M. H. LOUDEN.”,

No. 37.-A portion of the parents of my flock were derived from Jowet & Hayes, who derived their flook from John A. Taintor's importation from

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