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Their domestic Furniture also mean, but that of the

Churches very magnificent

10

Mechanics and Artisans

11

II. LITERATURE.

13

1. The Vernacular : Songs the most ancient existing

Relics

13

The Elder Caedmon; Account of him by Bede

14

His first Verses ; Periphrastic Character of the Anglo.

Saxon Poetry

16

Is the Poem on the Creation, &c. justly ascribed to Caed-

mon ? Extracts

17

Its general Character, Poverty of Description

19

Vernacular Poetry peculiarly agreeable to the Anglo-

Saxons; Contrivance of St. Aldhelm

20

Other Vernacular Pieces : “Death of Brithnoth"

22

Analysis of this ancient Poem

23

Character of this Piece

27

“ The Battle of Finsborough

27

“ The Ruined Wall-Stone”

30

Beowulf;” Enquiry into the Age and Country of this

remarkable Production

31

Analysis of this ancient Poem

Hrothgar, King of Denmark; the mysterious Grendel ;

its nocturnal Visit to the Palace

35

Beowulf, hearing of the Affair, resolves to free Hrothgar

from the Demon; sails to Denmark

His Reception by the King

37

Characteristic Entertainment at the Court

38

The Grendel revisits the Palace; Extract from the Poem 40

He is overcome by Beowulf, and sent howling to his de-

mon Home

41

The Mother of the Demon, to revenge her Son, who is

mortally wounded, comes by Night to the Palace and

carries off one of the Courtiers

42

Beowulf resolves to pursue her into her mysterious

Abode; his wonderful Adventures

43

Continuation of the Poem; Beowulf in his old Age fights

a Dragon, and is mortally wounded ; Conclusion 45

Character of this Poem

48

Extract from Dr. Gruntrig; low State of Literature in

England

49

Other Relics of Saxon Literature; Translation of a Ho

mily

50

Character of this Homily

54

Archbishop Elfric

55

2. Latin Literature of the Anglo-Saxons

56

That the Church Service in Latin was a great and obvi.

ous Advantage; to it is owing much of European Im-

provement

56

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64

The Legend it contains, the Foundation of a Romance in

Mr. Ellis's Collection

66

Analysis of that Portion of the Romance relating to the

Legend, with copious Extracts

67

Bede as an Historian

St. Aldhelm

75

Of his Works still extant, all are remarkable for bombastic

Amplification

78

Proved by one of his Epistles

80

And by an Extract

81

And by a Letter to a Student

81

His Poetry, however, has better Claims on our Attention 83

Puerility of his Preface to the Abbess Maxima

83

Invocation of his great Poem,“ De Laude Virginum” 84

Every holy Name in Sacred History he makes to have

been a “ Virgin”

86

Praise of Chastity

88

Original and versified Translation of one Character in

the Poem ; St. Ambrose

89

And St. Thecla

90

General Character of St. Aldhelm as a Poet

92

Bede; Sketch of his Life

93

Striking Extract from the Monk Cuthbert relating the

Manner of his Death

95

Different Works ascribed to Bede

97

Many of them, however, cannot possibly be his

- 99

Extract from his Commentaries

His mystifying Spirit

. 101

His Homilies; Extract from one on the Marriage at

Cana in Galilee

102

From another Homily

104

General Character of Bede as a Preacher

- 105

The Doctrine which he teaches identical with those of

the ancient Fathers

107

Bede as a Poet

110

Alcuin

Translation of his celebrated Address to his Cell

112

Decline of Literature among the Anglo-Saxons; Causes 113

III. SCIENCE

115

General State of Science among the Anglo-Saxons 115

Arithmetic of that People; Difficulty of Calculations ;

Digital and Manual Reckoning

- 100

- 111

- 116

- 202

193

He escapes into Flanders

197

1165—1166. His Reception by the King of France and the Pope; he

assumes the Cistercian Habit; he excommunicates his

Enemies

198

1166–1170. His Transactions abroad continued ; Henry pretends a

Reconciliation, and Becket returns at his imminent

Peril

1170. At Whitsand he learns that his Fate is decreed, yet he

resolves to revisit his Flock; his Reception in England;

Machinations of his Enemies; the Cloud which hung

over his Destiny every Day blackens

206

The Prelates whom he had excommunicated incense the

King against him; four Knights leave the Court in

Normandy, hasten to Canterbury, and murder him in

the Cathedral

209

A critical Enquiry into the circumstances preceding and

attending his Assassination; Recapitulation of Facts;

the Deed deliberately planned by King Henry and his

Knights : other Observations in proof of the Hypo-

thesis

212

1170_1216. Further Proofs of Henry's Guilt; the Church under

Richard and John

221

1216_1250. Under Henry III. ; Extract

1250_1307. Combination of the Clergy and Laity to obtain a Redress

of Grievances; Rapacity of the Pope, and the King,

227

Luxury of the Church at this period

231

Monachism in England; different Orders; Friars, &c.

St. Robert

St. Bartholomew

- 236

1083_1139. St. Gilbert of Sempringham

Distinguished himself at the celebrated Schools of Paris 241

His Resistance to Temptation

241

His rigorous Life; his Charity to the Sick and Poor ; re-

ceives Holy Orders

- 223

- 233

- 235

- 241

• 242
272

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Character of Wycliffe

1384_1417. The Lollards

• 278

Act De Hæretico comburendo

II. LITERATURE

- 280

Latin Literature

Geoffrey of Monmouth

281

1146_-1220. Giraldus Cambrensis

298

Appointed Preceptor to Prince John, whom he accom-

panies to Ireland ; his Itinerarium Cambrie

Miracles related by Giraldus

304

His Account of the Customs and Manners of the Welsh,

in Descriptio Cambriæ

311

Latin Poets. – Robert of Dunstable; Henry of Hunting-

don ; John of Salisbury; Hanwill; Neckham

Walter Mapes, Archdeacon of Oxford ; Joseph of Exeter 315

Great Value set upon Books:

. 317

- 277

. 280

- 281

- 300

• 314

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