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Southey. 128

39. The Bobolink

Irving. 132

40. Robert of Lincoln

Bryant. 135

41. Rebellion in Massachusetts State-prison J. T. Buckingham. 138

42. Faithless Nelly Gray.

Hood. 143

43. The Generous Russian Peasant

Nikolai Karamzin. 146

44. Forty Years Ago

148

45. Mrs. Caudle's Lecture

Douglas Jerrold. 151

46. The Village Blacksmith

Longfellow. 154

47. The Relief of Lucknow

“London Times." 156

48. The Snow-storm

Thomson. 159

49. Behind Time

161

50. The Old Sampler

Mrs. M. E. Sangster. 163

51. The Goodness of God

Bible. 167

52. My Mother .

170

53. The Hour of Prayer

Mrs. F. D. Hemans. 171

54. The Will

172

55. The Nose and the Eyes

Cowper. 176

56. An Iceberg

L. L. Noble. 177

57. About Quail

W. P. Hawes. 180

58. The Blue and the Gray

F. M. Finch. 183

59. The Machinist's Return

“Washington Capital.” 185

60. Make Way for Liberty

James Montgomery. 189

61. The English Sky-lark

Elihu Burritt. 193

62. How Sleep the Brave

William Collins. 195

63. The Rainbow

John Keble. 195

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TITLE.

AUTHOR. PAGE

64. Supposed Speech of John Adams

Daniel Webster. 196

65. The Rising .

T. B. Read. 200

66. Control your Temper

Dr. John Todd. 204

67. William Tell

Sheridan Knowles. 207

68. William Tell

Sheridan Knowles. 216

69. The Crazy Engineer .

221

70. The Heritage

Lowell. 228

71. No Excellence without Labor.

William Wirt. 230

72. The Old House-clock

232

73. The Examination

D. P. Thompson. 234

74. The Isle of Long Ago

B. F. Taylor. 239

75. The Boston Massacre

Bancroft. 241

76. Death of the Beautiful

Mrs. E. L. Follen. 245

77. Snow Falling

J. J. Piatt. 246

78. Squeers's Method

Dickens. 247

79. The Gift of Empty Hands

Mrs. S. M. B. Piatt. 252

80. Capturing the Wild Horse

Irving. 253

81. Sowing and Reaping .

Adelaide Anne Procter. 258

82. Taking Comfort .

Whittier. 259

83. Calling the Roll

Shepherd. 262

84. Turtle Soup

C. F. Briggs. 263

85. The Best Kind of Revenge

266

86. The Soldier of the Rhine

Mrs. C. E. S. Norton. 269

87. The Winged Worshipers

Charles Sprague. 271

88. The Peevish Wife

Maria Edgeworth. 273

89. The Rainy Day.

Longfellow. 276

90. Break, Break, Break

Tennyson. 277

91. Transportation and Planting of Seeds H. D. Thoreau. 278

92. Spring Again

Mrs. Celia Thaxter. 282

93. Religion the only Basis of Society William E. Channing. 284

94. Rock Me to Sleep

Mrs. E. A. Allen. 286

95. Man and the Inferior Animals

Jane Taylor. 288

96. The Blind Men and the Elephant

J. G. Saxe. 290

97. A Home Scene.

* D. G. Mitchell. 292

98. The Light of Other Days

Moore. 295

99. A Chase in the English Channel

Cooper. 296

100. Burial of Sir John Moore

Charles Wolfe. 301

101. Little Victories

Harriet Martineau. 302

102. The Character of a Happy Life

Sir Henry Wotton. 308

103. The Art of Discouragement

Arthur Helps. 309

104. The Mariner's Dream

William Dimond. 312

105. The Passenger Pigeon

Audubon. 315

106. The Country Life

R. H. Stoddard. 319

107. The Virginians

Thackeray. 321

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SUBJECT.
The Good Reader
The Fish I Did n't Catch .
The Corn Song
I Pity Them
The Town Pump
Good-night.
The Tea-rose
Forty Years Ago
The Old Sampler
The Old Sampler
About Quail
The Crazy Engineer
Squeers's Method
Turtle Soup
Hamlet

PAGE
H. F. Farny.

39
. H. F. Farny.

65
E. K. Foote. 76
W. L. Sheppard. 86
Howard Pyle. 105

J. A. Knapp. 109
C. S. Reinhart. 124

H. Fenn. 149
Mary Hallock Foote. 165
Mary Hallock Foote. 166
Alexander Pope. 181

H. F. Farny. 222
Howard Pyle. 249
W. L. Sheppard. 264
Alfred Fredericks. 330

INTRODUCTION.

I. PRELIMINARY REMARKS.

The great object to be accomplished in reading as a rhetorical exercise is to convey to the hearer, fully and clearly, the ideas and feelings of the writer.

In order to do this, it is necessary that a selection should be carefully studied by the pupil before he attempts to read it. In accordance with this view, a preliminary rule of importance is the following:

RULE I.—Before attempting to read a lesson, the learner should make himself fully acquainted with the subject as treated of in that lesson, and endeavor to make the thought, and feeling, and sentiments of the writer his own.

REMARK.-When he has thus identified himself with the author, he has the substance of all rules in his own mind. It is by going to nature that we find rules. The child or the savage orator never mistakes in inflection, or emphasis, or modulation. The best speakers and readers are those who follow the impulse of nature or most closely imitate it as observed in others.

II. ARTICULATION.

Articulation is the utterance of the elementary sounds of a language, and of their combinations.

An Elementary Sound is a simple, distinct sound, made by the organs of speech.

The Elementary Sounds of the English language are divided into Vocals, Subvocals, and Aspirates.

ELEMENTARY SOUNDS.

VOCALS.

Vocals are sounds which consist of pure tone only. A diphthong is a union of two vocals, commencing with one and ending with the other.

DIRECTION.Put the lips, teeth, tongue, and palate in their proper position; pronounce the word in the chart forcibly, and with the falling inflection, several times in succession; then drop the subvocal or aspirate sounds which precede or follow the vocal, and repeat the vocals alone.

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Diphthongs. oi, oy, as in oil, boy.

ou, ow, as in out, now.

REMARK 1.-In this table, the short sounds, except ŭ, are nearly or quite the same in quality, as certain of the long sounds. The difference consists chiefly in quantity.

REMARK 2.—The vocals are often represented by other letters or combinations of letters than those used in the table; for instance, a is represented by ai in hail, by ea in steak, etc.

REMARK 3.-As a general rule, the long vocals and the diphthongs should be articulated with a full, clear utterance; but the short vocals have a sharp, distinct, and almost explosive utterance.

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