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gaged two gentlemen, formerly in his Ma- with Bergami; their beds being close tojesty's navy, Mr Hannam and Mr Flinn, gether. Every night during the voyage to at Augusta. She obtained for Bergami Italy, they slept thus together without in. the title of Baron Francini. At Catania terruption or intermission; not only this, she sat for her picture, and had two copies but in the day time they frequently met taken, one dressed rather indecently as a together, and letting down the curtains and Magdalen, the other as a Turkish Female. excluding all the rest of the crew and pas. At Augusta, she hired a polacre, for the sengers, but so unsuccessfully, that they purpose of proceeding to Tunis. In this were frequently secn embracing, the Queen vessel the same arrangements as before sitting on Bergami's knee. But more than were not made to secure a vicinity between this, a bath was frequently prepared for the the Queen's room and Bergami's; but in Queen, and Bergami was always her only a day or two a bed was provided for Ber- attendant to the bath. On the 24th of gami, in a place where he and the Queen August (St Bartholomew) Bergami's patron might freely converse in their respective saint's day, was celebrated on board with beds, free from interruption by any person, great rejoicing; the Queen's health and the approach to her room being through Bergami's being always drank together. At Bergami's. The door of the latter was in- Villa d'Este, the Queen and Bergami frestantly shut, and the interior door could quently acted together in dramatic pieces ; not be opened without the parties mutual. from this place she proceeded to Lugano, ly seeing each other in bed. At Utica, si. but before she left Villa d'Este a courier, milar arrangements were made, all of her who had a letter to deliver to Bergami, suite but the Countess Oldi, Bergami, and went early in the morning, or rather at the little Victorina, sleeping at the British midnight, to look for that person ; he did Consul's. At this place Bergami went into not find him in that room, and he did disher bed-chamber before she rose, early, and cover Bergami coming in his shirt from the remained there a considerable time before she Queen's room: for this Bergami, indeed, got up; these repetitions might be tedious, apologized, by stating that he had heard but the intimacy which was in fact habi. his child cry, and next morning desired the tual, could not be otherwise described. At man not to mention it. From Villa d'Este Sabona or Saboan, in the month of April she proceeded to a place purchased for Ber1816, the rooms were again contiguous; gami, called the Villa Bergami, or the in Bergami's was no bed, and the Queen's Barona. There, during the carnival, the bed next morning bore unequivocal marks Queen's house exhibited the most disgraceof two persons having lain in it. From ful scenes-scenes more fitted for a brothel Africa she proceeded to Athens, and from than the residence of any persons possessing Rome to Ephesus and Troy; at Athens a moral feeling. These scenes should not the Queen was visited by a Captain of the affect the Queen's character, had they not English Navy; he was introduced to an passed under her eye, and with her knowalcove, where he found her Majesty sitting ledge and approbation ; in fact, her paswith Bergami and the Countess Oldi ; Bersion seemed to have blinded her to all sense gami upon this occasion treated the Queen of decency. In February 1817, she prowith marked and rude indifference, rising ceeded to Germany through Tyrol; at Charfrom the conversation without the least nitz, Bergami had to leave the Queen in token of civility. At Ephesus the Queen order to look for a passport. Her Majesty had a bed prepared for her under a vesti. called in one of the maids. But Bergami bule, opposite à church ; her dinner was returning from Ipspruck in the middle of to be served here to her and Bergami alone; the night, the fille de chambre was ordered the Queen sat on the bedside, Bergami sitting out, and Bergami was left with the Queen on the ground beside her ; they remained at that late hour. The usual arrangements as usual a long time alone. At Aum (in were made with respect to the bed-rooms, Syria) Bergami was seen coming from the and in Bergami's bed was found the Queen Queen's room (she being in bed) in a state sitting with

Bergami's arnis round her neck, of undress, viz. in his shirt sleeves. This he being naked and in bed. The Queen's might be nothing as an insulated fact, but cloak was found in this bed, where also reas a part of such a series of conduct as he mained such marks as must prove that had described to them, their Lordships two persons had lain in it.

This was a might be perhaps satisfied with it. At bout the beginning of March 1817. Jerusalem she established the Order of St Vienna the Queen remained but a short Caroline, of which she appointed the time. From that city she travelled to Trieste Courier Bergami Grand Master; so your in a two wheeled carriage, accompanied by Lordships now have Bergami Knight of Bergami only. At Trieste the usual arMalta, of the Sepulchre, of St Caroline, and rangements were made in respect to the Baron delta Francini. She now embarked bed-rooms. But besides this, there were at Jaffa : on the deck of her vessel was two beds in the Queen's room, and this erected a cabin for the Queen, in which room every morning presented the appear. she slept alone, and without separation, ance of two persons having slept in it;

At

and the marks so frequently alluded to 1817. He had abstained in this case from were obvionsly visible; and Bergami was going through a variety of particular dethe only person who had access to the a- tails of what would be disclosed in evidence partment generally during the journey. respecting her Majesty's residence at Villa Bergami frequently rested on the same d'Este, where she resided for a considerable bed with the Queen, not, however, undres- time, on the banks of the Lago di Como. sed. Upon her Majesty's return from It would be proved in evidence that she Milan, where she had been for some time, was there in the habit of going out with to the Barona, it would be proved to their Bergami in a sort of carriage large enough Lordships that Bergami, his mother, and for only one person to sit down in, and his brother, (Lewis Bergami,) who had for. another to sit upon his lap. In this car. merly exercised some of the most menial riage she was in the habit of going out offices in the palace, were permitted to with Bergami, she sitting upon bis lap, dine with her Majesty ; they were allowed and he with his arms round her, which it to sit and eat at her Majesty's table. At was absolutely necessary he should have, the Villa Branti, near Rome, as at all in order to enable him to guide the horse. other places where her Majesty resided, it It would be proved that they were seen towas arranged that Bergami's apartment gether in a canoe upon the lake; and on should be very near that of her Majesty; one occasion they were seen bathing togeand there was a communication through'a ther in the river Brescia. During her recorridor from Bergami's bed-room into her sidence at Como they were observed togeMajesty's. Bergami was observed, by one ther in very indecent situations; and a of the servants, two or three times, and at variety of familiarities of that sort would be á very early hour in the morning, going proved during her residence at Como by a from his own bed-room into that of the variety of witnesses, and upon various ocPrincess of Wales, and there remaining casions, which their Lordships would think with her Majesty. This happened some at present it became him to abstain from time in the month of July 1817. Their more particularly noticing. He only adLordships would have it proved to them, verted to them to prove the facilities of in. that upon two or three occasions it was ob- tercourse which existed. On her return served, that, either at night, or at an un- from the East, she brought in her train a seasonably early hour of the morning, when man who, from the accounts given of him the rest of the family were retired to rest, by the witnesses, appeared to have been a Bergami was seen coming from his sleep- man of brutal and depraved manners to the ing apartment and going into that of her last degree: his name was Mahomet, who, Majesty, and there remaining. At the at the Villa d'Este, at various times exhibitVilla Branti, as on other occasions, Berga. ed the most atrocious indecencies in the premi was admitted into her Majesty's pre- sence of her Majesty, Bergami being presence when she was dressing, and at her sent with her Majesty during the time of toilette ; when her Majesty, in short, was those exhibitions. They were of so indein that state of dishabille which made such cent a character that it was with pain he admission very highly improper.

From mentioned them. Their Lordships would Branti her Majesty removed, in the month find, that, upon her Majesty's first going to of August, to her Villa near Pesaro, where Italy, she did that constantly which comshe afterwards almost entirely resided. At ported with her dignity as an English Pesaro the Princess chose rooms for her. Princess and let him add as a Protestant self and Berganii, separate and apart from Princess. She either had divine service the rest of her suite; and at Pesaro the regularly performed at home, or attended same facilities of intercourse were continued places where it was performed after the which had been attended to at almost every rites of the Church of England. This replace which her Majesty had visited, and gulation continued until a short time after every where she had taken up her residence. she returned to Genoa, where Bergami first So attached did her Majesty always appear entered into her service ; but from that to the person and society of Bergami, that time down to her departure for England it his absence seemed to occasion her consider- was discontinued, and she was seen to acable pain. The greatest interest and anxiety company Bergami to a place of Catholic for his return were constantly expressed by worship which he himselt frequented, to her Majesty, and she appeared to be highly join in the prayers of the services, and to gratified when that occurred. She was ac- kneel down by his side. This Bergami customed to watch for his return; and up- was a man in the greatest poverty ; in Ocon one occasion actually set out to meet tober 1814, he was received into her Mahim. Upon his at length returning she jesty's service, and in the short course of was observed to express the greatest joy, five or six months, he was not only in the and all that fondness and attachment which habits of the greatest familiarity with her, might be supposed to exist for each other but his whole family surrounded her. Their in two persons between whom such an in- Lordships would allow him to call their alercourse existed. This was in August tention to the state of her Majesty's esta

blishment, while settled at Pesaro. There he did not receive, and had applied to the was Bergami himself, her grand chamber. British government for reimbursement. lain ; his mother, who did not appear to The first witness, Theodore Majocchi, have held any particular situation in her was then re-examined as to his having household ; his brother Lewis, who, from been in England last year, and certain de the humble station of a courier, had been clarations which he had made relative to promoted to be her equerry; the Countess her Majesty. He admitted having been of Oldi, (the sister,) who was the only maid in Gloucester, and in the service of a Mr of honour; Francis Bergami, their cousin, Hyatt; and that he had spoken of the who was dignified with the title of Director Queen as a good woman, but surrounded of the Palace ; Faustina, the sister ; Mar. by bad people ; but had never said that tin, a page ; Frances, a relation ; and the she behaved with propriety. He further house-steward, besides the child. So that confessed, that he had complained of Ber. there were ten, as he might say, of his fa. gami for keeping back part of the servants' mily retained in her service.

wages. As to other points, he replied as The Attorney-General then proceeded to usual" Non mi ricordo.comment on the various facts which he dug, 25.-- Francisco Briolo, formerly had stated, after which, the Solicitor-Ge. cook to her Royal Highness, deponied neral proceeded to examine witnesses. to some indecent exhibitions made by one

The first witness called was Thcodore Mahomet in presence of the Princess; and Majocchi, an Italian, and a discarded ser to certain familiarities between her and vant of the Queen's. On his entering the Bergami. Cross-examined - Had some house, her Majesty, who had previously quarrels with Bergami and his brother, taken her seat, started up, and uttering an and was discharged by the former. exclamatory shriek, suddenly left the house. Captain Pechell, of the Clorinde frigate, This circumstance was by the enemies of deponed as to refusing to dine with the the Queen considered as a token of guilt, Princess in company with Bergami. while her friends represent it as a natural Captain Briggs, of the Leviathan, had burst of honest indignation at finding a seen Bergami and the Princess walking man whom she had formerly loaded with arm in arm, which he did not consider at favours, now classed among her accusers. all uncommon; had never observed any Majocchi had been with her Majesty in improper familiarity between them. most of her travels, and gave evidence to Pietro Pachi, keeper of a hotel al many circumstances of suspicious familia. Trieste where the Princess lodged, had obrity existing between Bergami and the served Bergami's bed, which appeared not Queen, then Princess of Wales. In his to have been slept in. Had seen him cross-examination, he said he had been, through the key-hole coming from the since his discharge from the Princess, in Princess's room in his coat and drawers. the service of Lord Stewart, the British Barbara Crosse, servant at an inn in Ambassador at Vienna. But when any Carlsruhe, carried water to the Princess's thing was asked which bore upon the facts room one day, and saw Bergami in the stated in his examination, a direct answer bed, with his arm round the Princess's to which might have led him to contradict neck, who' was sitting on the bed, and himself, he seemed to have lost his me- started up as she entered. Made Ber. mory altogether; and his general answer gami's bed, and found on it some marks

Non mi ricordo" _I do not recol- which she described; but which will not lect. His examination and cross-exami- admit of being repeated. This witness's nation lasted till Wednesday the 23d. examination was resumed on the 26th;

Gaetano Paturzo, mate of the vessel in and on her cross-examination Lord Lauderwhich her Majesty sailed in the course of dale interposed, alleging that the course her voyage to Tunis, &c. was next called, taken by the Queen's counsel was unjusti. and corroborated the testimony of Majoc. fiable. Mr Brougham contended for the chi in regard to the Princess's conduct right of cross-examining witnesses immewhile on board. Cross-examined, he said diately after their examination, as to such he was to receive 800 dollars per month, special circumstances as her Majesty's for time lost by attending as a witness. counsel should deem necessary ; reserving

Aug. 24.Vincenzo Garguilo, master a right to a future cross-examination, after of the vessel aforesaid, and a relation of inquiry into the characters of the witnesthe mate, corroborated the testimony of the ses. This point led to long discussions, two preceding witnesses. Had more than which occupied the House till Tuesday the one seen Bergami and the Princess kiss- 29th, when it was determined agreeably to ing. Cross-examined—was to receive 1000 the wishes of Mr Brougham, by a majoridollars per month for the time he should be ty of 121 to 105. On this question the detained from his business. Had only 750 Lord Chancellor and Lord Redesdale vodollars from the Princess for the use of his ted on one side, and the Earls Liverpool ship and crew ; but was promised a pre- and Harrowby on the other. The foriner sent of 6000 dollars from Bergami, which were left in a minority.

was

Guiseppe Bianchi, door-keeper of an Sept. 5.-Guiseppe Sacchi, formerly a inn at Venice ; Paulo Ruggazzoni, a man courier, and afterwards equerry to the son, who had been employed at the Prin- Queen, deponed to various familiarities becess's villa on the lake of Como ; Hierony. tween the Princess and Bergami ; and to vaTrans Miardi, an Italian, director of the rious indecent scenes which he alleged took Princess's gardens ; Paolo Org: one, an place in the Princess's house, and with her ander cook in the service of the Princess knowledge. At the close of this witness's while at Como, were on this and the fol. examination on the 6th, the Attorney-Genelowing day examined, and spoke to various ral rose and stated, that several of his witfamiliarities which they had seen take nesses, who were on their road to give place between the Princess and Bergami. evidence, had taken flight, from the reports The former bad seen her purchase a gold they had received of the treatment of the chain, which she touk from her own neck, former witnesses by the populace at Dover, and put on that of Bergami, who in a play- and had actually returned to Lugano. ful manner replaced it around the neck of On this ground he craved of their Lord. the Princess.

ships that they would, by adjourning their Louisa De Mont, principal female attend. Proceedings, grant the tinie that might be ant to her Royal Highness, was next cal. judged necessary to bring back these wit. led, and her examination and cross-exami- nesses, who, he understood, were now on nation occupied the House till Saturday the their way thither to give evidence at their 20 September. This witness deponed to Lordships' bar. Mr Brougham protested many of the strongest iacts stated by the in the strongest terms against any delay, Attorney-General, regarding the familiarity as contrary to precedent, and to every rule between the Princess and Bergami-Had of justice. The House, after some discusseen the one passing to the bed-room of sion, adjourned, reserving the question for the other. Spoke to the Princess's bed further consideration. having the appearance of two persons Sept. 7.-The Attorney-General withsleeping in it, &c. In her cross-examina. drew the application which he had made tion she confessed having been discharged to the House for delay in the case of the from the Princess's service for telling a Queen, having received, as be stated, disfalsehood. Acknowledged writing a letter patches, informing him that the witnesses to her sister, five months after her dismis. would not arrive in town within the time sal, in which she eulogised, in the highest stated. Mr Brougham was then allowed terms, the piety and virtues of the Prin- to recall Theodore Majocchi, in his cross-excess, and imploring her “ generous bene- amination of whom, among other circumfactress" to receive her back into her fa- stances, it was brought out, that he had been vour. Her letter farther stated that the three times at Carlton House on various Princess was surrounded by spies, and that pretexts. He was afterwards re-examined she had herself been offered a brilliant for. by the Attorney-General and several Peers; tune, and the unlimited power of drawing and Mr Brougham having distinctly deon a banker in London, if she would go to clared that he contemplated no future

cross-examination, the Solicitor-General Sept. 4.-Alerundio Chinetti, an orna- commenced his recapitulation of the evi. mental painter, who was employed at the dence, from which he argued that the Villa d'Este, on the lake of Como, had charge of adulterous intercourse had been seen the Princess and Bergami embracing fully made out. This closed the case for

Dominico Bruza, Antonio Bianchi, the prosecution. In reply to a question Giovani Lucini, Callo Conleti, and Fran- from the Earl of Lonsdale, the Earl of cisco Cursini, gave similar evidence. Liverpool stated, that, as the proceedings

Guiseppe Prestilli, a superintendent of had been instituted solely on the ground of the stables to the Princess, but dismissed public justice, and not with any view of her service for embezzlement, swore to personal relief to an Illustrious Personage, having seen the Princess and Bergami he should not press the Divorce Clause in riding out in a carriage from Pesaro ; and the Bill, if, in the proper stage, a strong that, on going up to receive orders, he saw objection arose to it, from religious or other the Princess's hand in the small clothes of motives. Mr Brougham was then called Bergami.

upon to state the course of defence he in. Guiseppe Galli, waiter at the Crown tended to adopt ; and was subsequently Inn at Balasend, had seen the Princess and given until 12 o'clock the following day, Bergami kissing.

at his own request, to consult with his ilGuiseppe Del Orto, a baker at Como, lustrious client and his brother counsel saw the Princess sitting in a garden with upon the point in question. Bergami, his arm round her neck, and he Sept. 8.-Mr Brougham requested that making love to and kissing her.

he might be allowed to open his case, but Guiseppe Gourgiandi, à boatman, de- that an option should be given him of poned to their sailing out together on the eitlier calling witnesses in immediately, or lake of Como, and to seeing them kissing. at some future period.

that eity.

VOL. VII.

M m

On this point a discussion took place, day when her Majesty would be ready to and it was decided, by 165 to 60, that proceed in her defence, Me Brougham said this privilege could not be granted to her he would ask their Lordships to allow Majesty's Counsel.

them till this day three weeks. The request Mr Brougham afterwards asked that he was acceded to, and the House consequentmight be allowed to make comments only adjourned to Tuesday the 3d of Octothe evidence adduced without entering ber next. upon his own case, which was also refused, HOUSE OF COMMONS.-Aug. 21.by a majority of 170 to 49.

The House met pursuant to adjournment. Sept. 9.-Mr Brougham, when called Lord F. Osborne moved, that an humble upon, at the meeting of the House, inform- address be presented to his Majesty to dised their Lordships that he had bcen in- solve Parliament, until it should be deemed structed by her Majesty to proceed in her expedient to re-assemble it for the dispatch defence with the least possible delay, under- of public business. Mr Brougham begged standing that, besides this course of pro- that the amendment might be with Irawn, cedure, no other alternative remained than as the proceedings in the

case of her Majes. to suffer the injurious effects of the case for ty could not now be put an end to without the prosecution being allowed to remain for great injustice to her. The amendment a considerable time without answer or com was negatived without a division, and the ment. Being desired to name a precise House adjourner till the 18th September.

BRITISH CHRONICLE.

AUGUST

oppression and cruelty, and especially Letter of Her Majesty to the King. when perpetrated by a perversion and The following letter from the Queen was mockery of the laws. sent to Carlton House, from whence it was A sense of what is due to my character returned unopened, with an intimation and sex forbids me to refer minutely to that it must reach the King through the the real causes of our domestic separation, medium of his prime minister. It was or to the numerous unmerited insults of therefore torwarded to Lord Liverpool; fered me previously to that period; but, who, to an inquiry of her Majesty, stated leaving to your Majesty to reconcile with that he had laid the letter before the King, the marriage vow the act of driving, by but had not received any commands on the such means, a wife from' beneath your subject.

roof, with an infant in her arms, your MaSir,-_After the unparalleled and un- jesty will permit me to remind you that provoked persecutions, which, during a that act was entirely your own that the seseries of years, has been carried on against paration, so far from being sought for by me, me under the name and authority of your was a sentence pronounced upon me, with Majesty- and which persecution, instead out any cause assigned, other than that of of being mollified by time, time has ren- your own inclinations, which, as your Madered only more and more malignant and jesty was pleased to allege, were not under unrelenting-it is not without a great your control. sacrifice of private feeling that I now, even Not to have felt, with regard to mysell, in the way of reinonstrance, bring myself chagrin at this decision of your Majesty, to address this letter to your Majesty. would have argued great insensibility to But, bearing in mind that royalty rests on the obligations of decorum; not to have the basis of public good ; that to this par. dropped a tear in the face of that beloved amount consideration all others ought to child, whose future sorrows were then but submit; and aware of the consequences too easy to foresee, would have marked me that may result from the present unconsti as unworthy of the name of mother ; but, tutional, illegal, and hitherto unheard of not to have submitted to it without repinproceedings; with a mind thus impressed, ing, would have indicated a consciousness I cannot refrain from laying my grievous of demerit, or a want of those feelings wrongs once more before your Majesty, in which belong to affronted and insulted lethe hope that the justice which your Ma. male honour. jesty may, by evil-minded counsellors, be The " tranquil and comfortable society." still disposed to refuse to the claims of a tendered to me by your Majesty, formed in dutiful, faithful, and injured wife, you my mind but a poor compensation for the may be induced to yield to considerations grief occasioned by copsidering the wound connected with the honour and dignity of given to public morals in the fatal example your Crown, the stability of your Throne, produced by the indulgence of your Mathe tranquillity of your dominions, the jesty's inclinations; more especially when happiness and safety of your just and loy. i contemplated the disappointment of the al people, whose generous hearts rcvolt at nation, who had so munificently provided

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