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the very day of Dr. Lambe's murder, his own portrait in the Councilchamber was seen to have fallen out of its frame; a circumstance as awful, in that age of omens, as the portrait that walked firom its frame in the Castle of Otranto, but perhaps more easily accounted for.'

• About this time a libel was taken down from a post in Colemanstreet by a constable, and carried to the Lord Mayor, who ordered it to be delivered to none but his Majesty. Of this libel the manuscript letter contains the following particulars :

“ Who rules the Kingdom? The King.

Who rules the King ? The Duke.

Who rules the Duke? The Devil.”. “ Let the Duke look to it; for they intend shortly to use him worse than they did the Doctor ; and if things be not shortly reformed they will work a reformation themselves."

• The only advice the offended King suggested, was, to set a double watch every night! . . .

It is a great descent from Dukes and Kings, but we must make room for a short extract from the article respecting our old friend Robinson Crusoe. " This picture of self-education, selfo inquiry, self-happiness,' remark's Mr. D'Israeli, is scarcely ' a fiction, although it includes all the magic of romance; and it ' is not a mere narrative of truth, since it displays all the forcible « genius of one of the most original ininds our literature can ! boast.'

The reception which this extraordinary production has met with, is soinewhat singular. In the author's life-time it was considered as a mere idle romance; after bis death, it was supposed to have been pillaged from the papers of Alexander Selkirk, in disparagement alike of De Foe's honour and his genius.

The adventures of Selkirk were first published in the year 1712, in the Voyages of Woodes Rogers, and Edward Cooke, by whom he was found on the desert island of Juan Fernandez. This interesting narrative is given entire in Captain Burney's fourth volume of “ Voyages of Discovery to the South Sea," and it is also to be found in the Encycopledia Britannica.

• The year after this account was published, Selkirk and his adven. tures attracted the notice of Steele, who was not likely to pass unobserved a man and a story so strange and so new. Io his paper of “ The Englishman," Dec. 1713, he communicates further particulars of Selkirk. Steele became acquainted with him: he says, that “ he should discern that he had been much separated from company, from his aspect and gesture. There was a strong but cheerful seriousness in his looks, and a certain disregard to the ordinary things about him, as if he had been sunk in ihought. The man frequently bewailed his return to the world, which could not, he said, with all its enjoyments, restore him to the tranquility of his solitude.” Steele adds another curious change in this wild man, which occurred some time after he had seen him. 16 Though I had frequently conversed with him, after

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a few month's absence, he met me in the street, and though he spoke to me, I could not recollect that I had seen him. Familiar converse in this town had taken off the lor eliness of his aspect, and quite altered the air of his face.” De Foe could not fail of being struck by these interesting particulars of the character of Selkirk; but probably it was another observation of Steele, which threw the germ of Robinson Cru. soe into the mind of De Foe. “ It was matter of great curiosity to hear him, as he was a man of sense, give an account of the different resolutions in his own mind in that long solitulle.

Even the personage Friday is not a mere coinage of the • brain : a Mosquito Indian described by Dampier was the pro• totype.'-Robinson Crusoe was published in 1719, seven years after the publication of Selkirk's adventures. Selkirk, therefore, could obviously have no claims ou De Foe.

• He had only supplied the man of genius with that which lies open to all; and which no one hud, or perhaps could have converted into the wonderful story we possess, but De Foe himself. Had De Foe not written Robinson Crusoe, the name and story of Selkirk bad been passed over like others of the saine sort; yet Selkirk has the merit of having detailed his own history, in a manner so interesting as to have attracted the notice of Steele, and to have inspired the genius of De Foe. After this. the originality of Robinson Crusoe will no longer be suspected, and the idle tale which Dr. Beattie has repcited, of Seikirk having supplied the materials of his story to De Foe, from which our. Author borrowed his work, and published for his own profit, will be finally put to rest.'

There is an article curious enough, on that race of singular mendicants known by the name of T'um o Bedlams. These poor creatures were roving lunatics, who were, in fact,'out-door

pensioners of Bedlam, sent about to live as well as they could ' with the pittance granted them by the Hospital.' This is the assumed character of Eilgar in King Lear, and the fact accounts for the number of mad songs wbich are to be found in our ancient poetry. Bishop Percy bas preserved no fewer than six in bis « Reliques,” Mr. D’Isracli presents to us one from a very scarce collection, which, when read with a reference to the personated character, will appear worthy of preservation for its fantastic humour. We extract a few verses.

"A TOM-A-BEDLAM SONG. • From the Hag and hungry goblin That into rags would rend ye,

All the spirits that stand

By the naked man,
In the book of moons defend ye !
That of your five sound senses
You never be forsaken;

Nor travel from

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To the widenese
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PUE S I summoned am to Toutes
MOD Ten leagues berend

The wide woni's end:
bis Methinks it is no jours!
We must now take leave of this musim
ude to the compiler, We wish to part with him in good ho

annot, however, but express our tegnet flat bias treba

ces should so often have trummener l
otter judgement and that he sliould ever dute gulis

nt to testify bis attachment to teratura de arts,
mniating those whom he is pleased to considers that anal

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a few month's absence, he met me in the street, and though he spoke to me, I could not recollect that I had seen him. Familiar converse in this town had taken off the lor eliness of his aspect, and quite altered the air of his face." De Foe could not fail of buing struck by these interesting particulars of the character of Selkirk; but probably it was another observation of Steele, which threw the germ of Robinson Crusoe into the mind of De Foe. “ It was matter of great curiosity to hear him, as he was a man of sense, give an account of the different resolutions in his own mind in that long solitulle.

Even the personage Friday " is not a mere coinage of the • brain : a Mosquito Indian described by Dampier was the prue ototype.'-Robinson Crusoe was published in 1719, seven years after the publication of Selkirk's adventures. Selkirk, therefore, could obviously have no claims on De Foe.

• He had only supplied the man of genius with that which lies open to all; and which no one had, or perbaps could have converted into the wonderful story we possess, but De Foe himself. Had De Foe not written Robinson Crusoe, the name and story of Selkirk bad been passed over like others of the saine sort; yet Selkirk has the merit of having detailed his own history, in a manner so interesting as to have attracted the notice of Steele, and to have inspired the genius of De Foe. After this. the originality of Robinson Crusoe will no longer be suspected, and the idle tale which Dr. Beattie has repcuted, of Scikirk having supplied the vi aterials of his story to De Foe, from which our Author borrowed his work, and published for his own profit, will be finally put to rest.'

There is an article curious enough, on that race of singular mendicants known by the name of Tum o' Bedlams. These poor creatures were roving lunatics, who were, in fact, out-door

pensioners of Bedlam, sent about to live as well as they could . with the pittance granted them by the Hospital.' This is the assumed character of Erigar in King Lear, and the fact accounts for the number of mad songs which are to be found in our ancient poetry, Bishop Percy bas preserved no fewer than six in bis “ Reliques.” Mr. D’Israeli presents to us one from a very scarce collection, which, when read with a reference to the personated cbaracter, will appear worthy of preservation for its fantastic humour. We extract a few verses.

"A TOM-A-BEDLAM SONG. • From the Hag and hungry goblin That into rags would rend ye,

All the spirits that stand

By the naked man,
In the book of moons defend ye !
That of your five sound senses
You never be forsaken; .

Nor travel from

Yourselves with Tom
Abroad, to beg your bacon.

• Chorus.
• Nor never sing any food and feeding,
Money, drink, or cloathing;

Come came or maid,

Be not afraid,
For Tom will injure nothing.
"Of thirty bare years have I
Twice twent been enraged;

And of forty been

Three times fifteen
In curance soundly caged.
In the lovely lofts of Bedlam,
In stubble soft and dainty,

Brave bracelets strong,

Sweet whips ding, dong,
And a wholesome hunger plenty.
• I know more than Apollo;
For, oft when he lies sleeping,

I behold the stars

At mortal wars,
And the rounded welkin weeping;
The moon embraces her shepherd,
And the Queen of Love her warrior;
While the first does horn

The stars of the morn,
And the next the heavenly farrier.
• With a heart of furious fancies,
Whereof I am commander;
· With a burning spear,

And a horse of air,
To the wilderness I wander;
With a knight of ghosts and shadows,
I summoned am to Tourney:

Ten leagues beyond

The wide world's end;
Methinks it is no journey!'

We must now take leave of this amusing volume, and ingratitude to the compiler, we wish to part with hia in good humour. We cannot, however, but express our regret that his irreligious prejudices should so often bave triumphed over his candour and his better judgement and that he should ever have thought it expedient to testify bis attachment to literature and the arts, by caJumniating those whom he is pleased to consider as their natural enemies. We confess we are Puritanical enough to object against his very motto, as carrying with it the air of libertinism ; but

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