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AN

ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY

OF

GREAT BRITAIN.

VOL. VII.

LONDON:

GILBERT AND RIVINGTON, PRINTERS,

ST. JOHN'S SQUARE.

AN

ECCLESIASTICAL HISTORY

OF

GREAT BRITAIN,

Chiefly of England,

FROM THE FIRST PLANTING OF CHRISTIANITY, TO THE END OF

THE REIGN OF KING CHARLES THE SECOND;

WITH A BRIEF ACCOUNT OF THE

AFFAIRS OF RELIGION IN IRELAND.

COLLECTED FROM THE BEST ANCIENT HISTORIANS, COUNCILS, AND RECORDS,

BY

JEREMY COLLIER, M.A.

NEW EDITION,
WITH A LIFE OF THE AUTHOR, EMBRACING A VIEW OF HIS OPINIONS, AND THOSE

OF THE NONJURORS AS A BODY,
BY THOMAS LATHBURY, M.A.

AUTHOR OF “ A HISTORY OF THE NONJURORS;"
THE CONTROVERSIAL TRACTS CONNECTED WITH THE HISTORY, AND A NEW AND

MUCH ENLARGED INDEX.

Juvat integros accedere fontes,
Atque haurire.

LUCRET.
Nec studio, nec odio.

IN NINE VOLUMES.

VOL. VII.

LONDON:
PRINTED FOR WILLIAM STRAKER,
ADELAIDE STREET, WEST STRAND.

2.

OAFORD

Archbishop Whitgift presses subscription to the three articles, 1.-Brown deserts

the Church of England and begins a sect, 1.-He forms separate congregations, 2.

-He is brought off his crror, relapses, and recovers, 3.--A book of discipline

drawn together, with the resolution of the assemblies putting it in practice, 4.

-Whitgift presses conformity, 6.-Petitions to the council against him, 7.-

His letter to the council with reference to the Kentish petition, 7.-His answer

to the remonstrance of the Suffolk ministers, 8.-Beale undertakes the Dis-

senters' cause, 9.-His misbehaviour towards the archbishop, 10.-The lords of

the council's letter to the archbishop in favour of the Dissenters, 12.-His an-

swer, 13.–Secretary Walsingham moves for indulgence to subscription, 16.—The

archbishop keeps close to the constitution, 16.-The lord Burleigh's motion to

the Dissenters, 16.—Sir Francis Walsingham's offer from the queen, 17.

Harpsfield's death and writings, 18.–Sanders dies this year; his character, 21.--

His treasonable letter to the Irish nobility, &c., 21.-The assembly's remon-

strance, 24.-Melvil declines the jurisdiction of the council-board, 25.-Several

acts of parliament made against the seditious preachers, 26.-Ministers to be de-

prived, for what crimes, 26.-Buchanan's books censured in parliament, 27.-

The Church endeavours to hinder the passing these bills, but to no purpose, 27.-

Pont, a minister, declares publicly against the legality of these acts of parliament,

28.-The king's declaration, 28.- The court libelled, 28.-The refugee-minis-

ters' remonstranco against the government, 29.- They receive an unacceptable
answer, 29.--A clash between lord Hunsdon and Walsingham, 30.—The Papists
complain of hard usage, 31.- The queen displeased with the rigours of the ma-

gistracy, 32.-- The queen of Scots' overture to queen Elizabeth, 33.—The ac-

commodation dashed by the clamour of the Scotch ministers, &c., 34.-A com-

bination practised among the Dissenters, 35.-Their national synod at London,

35.-The Book of Discipline moved to be read in the house of commons, but re-

jected, 36.-A conference at Lainbeth between some of the bishops and the Dis-

senters, 37.-The commons petition the lords in favour of the Dissenters, 37.-

The association enacted, 42.-An act enjoining Jesuits and popish priests to de-

part the realm, 42.-Archbishop Whitgift's letter to the queen, 42.— The queen

refuses to suffer any alteration in the discipline of the Church, 44.-Hilton's

recantation, 44.-The convocation sits several weeks after the prorogation of the

VOL. VII.

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