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ROCK OF AGES, CLEFT FOR ME.

Rock of Ages, cleft for me,
Let me hide myself in thee!
Let the water and the blood,
From thy riven side which flowed,
Be of sin the double cure,
Cleanse me from its guilt and power.

Not the labors of my hands
Can fulfil thy law's demands;
Could my zeal no respite know,
Could my tears forever flow,
All for sin could not atone,
Thou must save, and thou alone.

Nothing in my hand I bring,
Simply to thy cross I cling ;
Naked, come to thee for dress,
Helpless, look to thee for grace ;
Foul, I to the fountain fly,
Wash me, Saviour, or I die.

While I draw this fleeting breath,
When my eye-strings break in death,
When I soar to worlds unknown,
See thee on thy judgment-throne,
Rock of Ages, cleft for me,
Let me hide myself in thee!

AUGUSTUS MONTAGUE TOPLADY.

WHEN GATHERING CLOUDS AROUND I

VIEW.

When gathering clouds around I view,
And days are dark, and friends are few,
On Him I lean who not in vain
Experienced every human pain ;
He sees my wants, allays my fears,
And counts and treasures up my tears.
If aught should tempt my soul to stray
From heavenly wisdom's narrow way,
To fly the good I would pursue,
Or do the sin I wonld not do,
Still he who felt temptation's power
Shall guard me in that dangerous hour.
If wounded love my bosom swell,
Deceived by those I prized too well,
He shall his pitying aid bestow
Who felt on earth severer woe,
At once betrayed, denieil, or fled,
By those who shared his daily bread.
If rexing thoughts within me rise,
And sore dismayed my spirit dies,
Still he who once vonchsafed to bear
The sickening anguish of despair

What (childe), is the balance thine,

Thine the poise and acasure ?
If I say, Thou shalt be mine,

Finger not my treasure.
What the gains in having thee
Do amount to, oncly he
Who for man was sold can sce,
That transferred the accounts to me.
But as I can see no merit

Leading to this favour :
So the way to fit me for it

beyond my savour.
As the reason then is thine,
So the way is none of mine :
I disclaim the whole designe ;
Sinne disclaims and I resigne.
That is all, if that I could

Get without repining;
And my clay my crcature would

Follow my resigning :
That as I did freely part
With my glorie and ilcsert,
Left all joyes to feel all smart
Ah ! no more: thou break'st my heart.

GEORGE HERBERT.

JUST AS I AM.

Just as I am, — without one plea,
But that thy blood was shed for me,
And that thou bid'st me come to thee, –

O Lamb of God, I come! I come !
Just as I am, and waiting not
To rid my soul of one dark blot,
To thee whose blood can cleanse cach spot,

O Lamb of God, I come ! I come !
Just as I am, -- though tossed about
With many a conflict, many a doulit,
Fightings within, and fears without,

O Lamb of God, I come ! I come !
Just as I am, — poor, wretched, blind ;
Sight, riches, healing of the mind,
Yea, all I need, in thee to find,

O Lamb of God, I come ! I come !

Just as I am, - thou wilt receive;
Wilt welcome, pardon, cleanse, relieve ;
Because thy promise I believe,

O Lamb of God, I come! I come !

Just as I am, - thy love unknown
Has broken every barrier down ;
Now, to be thine, yea, thine alone, -

O Lamb of God, I come ! I come !

ANONYMOUS.

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“THOU HAST PUT ALL THINGS

UNDER HIS FEET.”

" Blessed are they who are homesick, for they shall come at las to their Father's house."-HEINRICH STILLING.

O NORTH, with all thy vales of green !

O South, with all thy palms ! From peopled towns and fields between

Uplift the voice of psalms.
Raise, ancient East ! the anthem high,
And let the youthful West reply.
Lo! in the clouds of heaven appears

God's well-beloved Son.
He brings a train of brighter years,

His kingdom is begun.
He comes a guilty world to bless
With mercy, truth, and righteousness.

Not as you meant, О learned man, and good !

Do I accept thy words of truth and rest;

God, knowing all, knows what for me is best. And gives me what I need, not what he could,

Nor always as I would !
I shall go to the Father's house, and see

Him and the Elder Brother face to face, -
What day or hour I know not. Let me be
Steadfast in work, and earnest in the race,

Not as a homesick child who all day long

Whines at its play, and seldom speaks in song If for a time some loved one goes away,

And leaves us our appointed work to do,

Can we to him or to ourselves be true
In mourning his departure day by day,

And so our work delay ?
Nay, if we love and honor, we shall make

The absence brief by doing well our task, Not for ourselves, but for the dear One's sake! And at his coming only of him ask

Approval of the work, which most was done,
Not for ourselves, but our Beloved One!

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Our Father's house, I know, is broad anıl grand;

In it how many, many mansions are !

And far beyond the light of sun or star, Four little ones of mine through that fair land

Are walking hand in hand ! Think you I love not, or that I forget

These of my loins ? Still this world is fair, And I am singing while my eyes are wet With weeping in this balmy summer air :

Yet I'm not homesick, and the children here

Have need of me, and so my way is clear. I would be joyful as my days go by,

Counting God's mercies to me. He who bore

O, HAPPY DAY THAT FIXED MY

CHOICE!

0, HAPPY day that fixed my choice

On thee, my Saviour and my God ! Well may this glowing heart rejoice,

And tell its raptures all abroad.

Life's heaviest cross is mine forevermore, And I who wait his coming, shall not I

On his sure word rely ?
And if sometimes the way be rough and steep,

Be heavy for the grief he sends to me,
Or at my waking I would only weep,
Let me remeinber these are things to be,

To work his blessed will until he come
And take my hand, and lead me safely home.

A. D. F. RANDOLPH.

IS THIS ALL ?

FROM “HYMNS OF FAITH AND PEACE.".

Sometimes I catch sucet glimpses of His face,

But that is all. Sometimes he looks on me, and seems to smile,

But that is all.
Sometimes he speaks a possing word of peace,

But that is all.
Sometimes I think I hear his loving voice

Upon me call.

And is this all he meant when thus he spoke,

“Come unto me" ?
Is there no deeper, more enduring rest

In him for thee?
Is there no steadier light for thee in him ?

0, come and see !

O, come and see ! O, look, and look again !

All shall be right; 0, taste his love, and see that it is good,

Thou child of night! 0, trust thou, trust thou in his

and

power! Then all is bright.

O DEAREST LAMB, TAKE THOU MY

HEART!

O DEAREST Lamb, take thou my heart !

Where can such sweetness be
As I have tasted in thy love,

As I have found in thee?

If there's a fervor in my soul,

And fervor sure there is,
Now it shall be at thy control,

And but to serve thee rise.

If love, that mildest flame, can rest

In hearts so hard as mine,
Come, gentle Saviour, to my breast,

Its love shall all be thine.

Now the gay world with treacherous art

Shall tempt my heart in vain ;
I have conveyed away that heart,

Ne'er to return again.

'T is heaven on earth to taste his love,

To feel his quickening grace,
And all the heaven I hope above

Is but to see his face.

MORAVIAN COLLECTION OF HYBINS.

THE DYING SAVIOUR.

grace

O SACRED Head, now wounded,

With grief and shame weighed down ;
Now scornfully surrounded

With thorns, thy only crown;
O sacred Ilead, what glory,

What bliss, till now was thine !
Yet, though despised and gory,

I joy to call thee mine.

Nay, do not wrong him by thy heavy thoughts,

But love his love.
Do thou full justice to his tenderness,

His mercy prove ;
Take him for what he is ; 0, take him all,

And look above!

Then shall thy tossing soul find anchorage

And steadfast peace ;
Thy love shall rest on his ; thy weary doubts

Forever cease.
Thy heart shall find in him and in his grace

Its rest and bliss !

O noblest brow and dearest,

In other days the world
All feared when thon appearedst;

What shame on thee is hurled !
How art thou pale with anguish,

With sore abuse and scorn !
How does that visage languish

Which once was bright as morn!

Christ and his love shall be thy blessed all

Forevermore !
Christ and his light shall shine on all thy ways

Forevermore!
Christ and his peace shall keep thy troubled soul

Forevermore!

What language shall I borrow,

To thank thee, dearest Friend,
For this thy dying sorrow,

Thy pity without end !
0, make me thine forever,

And should I fainting be,
Lord, let me never, nerer,

Outlive my love to thee.

HORATIUS BONAR.

THE ASCENSION OF CHRIST.

“ Bright portals of the sky,
Embossed with sparkling stars ;
Doors of eternity,
With diamantine bars,
Your arras rich uphold ;
Loose all your bolts and springs,

Ope wide your leaves of gold ;
That in your roofs may come the King of kings.

“Scarfed in a rosy cloud,
He doth ascend the air ;
Straight doth the Moon him shroud
With her resplendent hair;
The next encrystalled light
Submits to him its beams;

And he doth trace the height
Of that fair lamp which flames of beauty streams.

“The choirs of happy souls,
Wakod with that music sweet,
Whose descant care controls,
Their Lord in triumph meet;
The spotless spirits of light
His trophies do extol,

And, arched in squadrons bright, Greet their great Victor in his capitol.

O glory of the Heaven !
O sole delight of Earth !
To thee all power be given,
God's uncreated birth;
Of mankind lover true,
Endurer of his wrong,

Who dost the world renew,
Still be thou our salvation, and our song."
From top of Olivet such notes did rise,
When man's Redeemer did transcend the skies.

WILLIAM DRUMMOND,

TREMBLING, BEFORE THINE AWFUL

THRONE -
TREMBLING, before thinc awful throne,
O Lord ! in dust my sins I own:
Justice and Mercy for my life
Contend !-- 0, smile, and heal the strife.

If I, a wretch, should leave thee,

O Jesus, leave not me! In faith may I receive thee,

When death shall set me free. When strength and comfort languish,

And I must hence depart, Release me then from anguish,

By thine own wounded heart.

Be near when I am dying,

O, show thy cross to me! And for my succor flying,

Come, Lord, to set me free. These eyes new faith receiving,

From Jesus shall not move; For he who dies believing

Dies safely — through thy love.

PAUL GERHARDT.

MARY TO HER SAVIOUR'S TOMB

MARY to her Saviour's tomb

Hasted at the early dawn ;
Spice she brought, and rich perfume,

But the Lord she loved was gone.
For a while she weeping stood,

Struck with sorrow and surprise, Shedding tears, a pienteous flood,

For her heart supplied her eyes.

Jesus, who is always near,

Though too often unperceived, Comes his drooping child to cheer,

Kindly asking why she grieved. Though at first she knew him not,

When he called her by her name, Then her griefs were all forgot,

For she found he was the same.

Grief and sighing quickly fled

When she heard his welcome voice ; Just before she thought him dead,

Now he bids her heart rejoice.
What a change his word can make,

Turning darkness into day !
You who weep for Jesus' sake,

He will wipe your tears away.

He who came to confort her

When she thought her all was lost
Will for

your
relief

appear,
Though you now are tempest-tossed.
On his word your burdden cast,

On his love your thoughts employ ;
Weeping for a while may last,
But the morning brings the joy.

JOHN NEWTON.

The Saviour smiles ! upon my soul New tides of hope tumultuous roll, His voice proclaims my pardon found, Seraphic transport wings the sound ! Earth has a joy unknown in heaven, The new-born peace of sins forgiven ! Tears of such pure and deep delight, Ye angels ! never dimmed your sight.

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