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either of the provinces named in said proclamation, are to be admitted to free entry, when imported into the United States from such province, but due entry thereof must be made in conformity with the 7th section of the act of Congress “to provide for obtaining accurate statements of the foreign commerce of the United States," approved the 10th February, 1820.

In the enumeration above referred to, the several articles to be admitted without the payment of duty, are, in most instances, specified with sufficient clearness. It is conceived, however, that to obviate difficulty or misconstruction, it becomes proper to state that in regard to the class of woods as given in said enumeration under the title of “timber and lumber of all kinds, round, hewed, and sawed, unmanufactured in whole or in part,” the following specified articles, decisions in respect to all of which, with the exception of the article laths, have been heretofore made by this department under the existing tariff act, are to be considered as manufactures of wood, and therefore not admissible to free entry namely: beams, boards, planks, joists, shingles, laths, lasts, staves, hoops, headings, masts, spars, knees, canes, palings, pickets, posts, rails, rail-ties, or any other article of wood, entered under the designation of timber or lumber, or otherwise, if fully manufactured and fit for use as imported, or manufactured in whole or in part by planing, turning, or any process of manufacture other than hewing or sawing.

Application for the return of duties under this circular, and the cancellation of bonds for merchandise warehoused in bond, must be made to the Secretary of the Treasury, accompanied by the proper proof.

You will find the president's proclamation, and the several laws referred to, annexed, together with the Reciprocity treaty.

JAMES GUTHRIE,

Secretary of the Treasury.

By the President of the United States of America.

A PROCLAMATION. WHEREAS, by an act of the Congress of the United States, approved the fifth day of August, one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four, entitled “An act to carry into effect a treaty between the United States and Great Britain, signed on the fifth day of June, eighteen hundred and fifty-four,” it is provided that, whenever the President of the United States shall receive satisfactory evidence that the Imperial Parliament of Great Britain, and the Provincial Parliaments of Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward's Island, have passed laws on their part to give full effect to the provisions of the said treaty, he is authorized to issue his proclamation declaring that he has such evidence:

And whereas satisfactory information has been received by me that the Imperial Parliament of Great Britain, and the Provincial Parliaments of Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward's Island, have passed laws on their part to give full effect to the provisions of the treaty aforesaid:

Now, therefore, I, FRANKLIN PIERCE, President of the United States of America, do hereby declare and proclaim that, from this date, the following articles, being the growth and produce of the said provinces of CANADA, NEW BRUNSWICK, NOVA SCOTIA, and PRINCE EDWARD'S ISL- . AND—to wit: GRAIN, FLOUR, AND BREADSTUFFS OF ALL KINDS; ANIMALS OF ALL KINDS; FRESH, SMOKED, AND SALTED MEATS; COTTON-WOOL; SEEDS AND VEGETABLES; UNDRIED FRUITS; DRIED FRUITS; FISH OF ALL KINDS; PRODUCTS OF FISH AND ALL OTHER CREATURES LIVING IN THE WATER; POULTRY; EGGS; HIDES, FURS, SKINS, OR TAILS, UNDRESSED; STONE OR MARBLE IN ITS CRUDE OR UNWROUGHT STATE; SLATE; BUTTER, CHEESE, TALLOW; LARD; HORNS; MANURES; ORES OF METALS OF ALL KINDS; COAL; PITCH, TAR, TURPENTINE; ASHES; TIMBER AND LUMBER OF ALL KINDS, ROUND, HEWED, AND SAWED, UNMANUFACTURED IN WHOLE OR IN PART; FIRE-WOOD, PLANTS, SHRUBS, AND TREES; PELTS; WOOL; FISH OIL; RICE; BROOM-CORN AND BARK; GYPSUM, GROUND OR UNGROUND; HEWN OR WROUGHT OR UNWROUGHT BURR OR GRINDSTONES; DYE-STUFFS; FLAX, HEMP, AND TOW, UNMANUFACTURED; UNMANUFACTURED TOBACCO; RAGS,—shall be introduced into the United States free of duty, so long as the said treaty shall remain in force; subject, however, to be suspended in relation to the trade with Canada, on the condition mentioned in the fourth article of the said treaty; and that all the other provisions of the said treaty shall go into effect and be observed on the part of the United States.

Given under my hand, at the city of Washington, the sixteenth [L. S.] day of March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hun

dred and fifty-five, and of the independence of the United States
the seventy-ninth.

FRANKLIN PIERCE.
By the President:

W. L. MARcy, Secretary of State,

An act to carry into effect a treaty between the United States and Great Britain:

signed on the fifth day of June, eighteen hundred and fifty-four. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That whenever the President of the United States shall receive satisfactory evidence that the Imperial Parliament of Great Britain, and the Provincial Parliaments of Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward's Island, have passed laws on their part to give full effect to the provisions of the treaty between the United States and Great Britain, signed on the fifth of June last, he is hereby authorized to issue his proclamation declaring that he has such evidence, and thereupon, from the date of such proclamation, the following articles, being the

growth and produce of said provinces of Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward's Island, to wit: grain, flour, and breadstuffs of all kinds; animals of all kinds; fresh, smoked, and salted meats; cotton-wool; seeds and vegetables; undried fruits; dried fruits ; fish of all kinds ; products of fish and all other creatures living in the water; poultry; eggs; hides, furs, skins, or tails, undressed; stone or marble in its crude or unwrought state; slate; butter, cheese, tallow ; lard; horns ; manures; ores of metals of all kinds ; coal; pitch, tar, turpentine ; ashes ; timber and lumber of all kinds, round, hewed, and sawed, unmanufactured in whole or in part; firewood, plants, shrubs, and trees; pelts; wool; fish oil; rice; broom-corn and barks; gypsum, ground or unground; hewn or wrought or unwrought burr or grindstones ; dye-stuffs ; flax, hemp, and tow, unmanufactured; unmanufactured tobacco; rags,-shall be introduced into the United States free of duty so long as the said treaty shall remain in force; subject, however, to be suspended in relation to the trade with Canada, on the condition mentioned in the fourth article of the said treaty. And all the other provisions of the said treaty shall go into effect, and be observed on the part of the United States.

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That whenever the island of Newfoundland shall give its consent to the application of the stipulations and provisions of the said treaty to that province, and the legislature thereof and the Imperial Parliament shall pass the necessary laws for that purpose, the above enumerated articles shall be admitted free of duty from that province into the United States, from and after the date of a proclamation by the President of the United States declaring that he has satisfactory evidence that the said province has consented, in a due and proper manner, to have the provisions of the treaty extended to it, and to allow the United States the full benefits of all the stipulations therein contained. Approved August 5, 1854.

An act to amend “ An act to carry into effect a treaty between the United States

and Great Britain :" signed on the fifth of June, eighteen hundred and fiftyfour, and approved August fifth, eighteen hundred and fifty-four.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That from and after the date when the reciprocity treaty of the fifth June, eighteen hundred and fifty-four, entered into between Great Britain and the United States, shall go into effect, the Secretary of the Treasury shall be, and he is hereby, authorized and required to refund, out of any money in the Treasury, to the several persons entitled thereto, such sums of money as shall have been collected as duties on“ fish of all kinds, the products of fish, and of all other creatures living in the water," imported in the United States from and after the eleventh day of September, eighteen hundred and fifty-four, the date of the promulgation by

the President of the United States of the reciprocity treaty aforesaid, on · proof, satisfactory to the said Secretary, that the articles aforesaid were the products of some one of the British provinces of New Brunswick, Canada, Nova Scotia, Newfoundland, or Prince Edward's Island, and imported there

from into the United States, and duties duly paid thereon, which have not been refunded on export; and he is further authorized and required, from and after the day the treaty aforesaid shall go into effect, to cancel, on like satistory proof, any warehouse bonds, to secure the duties, that may have been given for any of said articles imported as aforesaid.

Sec. 2. And be it further enacted, That from and after the date when the reciprocity treaty of the fifth June, eighteen hundred and fifty-four, entered into between Great Britian and the United States, shall go into effect in the manner therein prescribed, the Secretary of the Treasury shall be, and he is hereby, authorized to refund, out of any money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, to the persons entitled thereto, such sums of money as shall have been collected as duties on any of the articles enumerated in the schedule annexed to the third article of the reciprocity treaty aforesaid, imported into the United States from the British provinces of Canada, New Brunswick, and Nova Scotia, respectively, since the date of the acts of their respective governments admitting like articles into said provinces from the United States free of duty, on proof, satisfactory to the said Secretary, that the articles so imported were the products of Canada, New Brunswick, or Nova Scotia, as the case may be, and imported therefrom into the United States, and that the duties were duly paid thereon; and he is further authorized and required to cancel, from and after the date the treaty aforesaid shall go into effect, on like satisfactory proof, any warehouse bonds, to secure duties, which may have been given for any of the said articles imported as aforesaid. And the Secretary of the Treasury is also hereby invested with the same authority and power to refund the duties or cancel the warehouse bonds on any of the articles enumerated in said treaty, the produce of Prince Edward's Island or Newfoundland, respectively, on said treaty going into operation, should it be proved, to the satisfaction of the said Secretary, that Prince Edward's Island or Newfoundland have admitted all of the articles enumerated in said treaty from the United States free of duty, prior to said treaty going into operation.

Approved March 2, 1855.

Reciprocity Treaty batween the United States of America and her Britannic

Majesty: concluded 5th June, 1854; ratified by the United States 9th August, 1854; exchanged 9th September, 1854; and proclaimed 11th September, 1854.

BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA :

A PROCLAMATION. Whereas a treaty between the United States of America and her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, was concluded and signed by their respective plenipotentiaries at Washington, on the 5th day of June last, which treaty is, word for word, as follows:

The government of the United States being equally desirous with her

Majesty the Queen of Great Britain to avoid further misunderstanding between their respective citizens and subjects in regard to the extent of the right of fishing on the coasts of British North America, secured to each by article 1 of a convention between the United States and Great Britain, signed at London on the 20th day of October, 1818; and being also desirous to regulate the commerce and navigation between their respective territories and people, and more especially between her Majesty's possessions in North America and the United States, in such manner as to render the same reciprocally beneficial and satisfactory, have, respectively, named plenipotentiaries to confer and agree thereupon—that is to say, the President of the United States of America, William L. Marcy, Secretary of State of the United States, and her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, James, Earl of Elgin and Kincardine, Lord Bruce and Elgin, a peer of the United Kingdom, Knight of the most ancient and most noble Order of the Thistle, and governor general in and over all her Britannic Majesty's provinces on the continent of North America, and in and over the Island of Prince Edward, who, after having communicated to each other their respective full powers, found in good and due form, have agreed upon the following articles :

Article 1. It is agreed by the high contracting parties that, in addition to the liberty secured to the United States fishermen by the above-mentioned convention of October 20, 1818, of taking, curing, and drying fish on certain coasts of the British North American colonies therein defined, the inhabitants of the United States shall have, in common with the subjects of her Britannic Majesty, the liberty to take fish of every kind, except shell-fish, on the seacoasts and shores, and in the bays, harbors, and creeks of Canada, New Brunswick, Nova Scotia, Prince Edward's Island, and of the several islands thereunto adjacent, without being restricted to any distance from the shore, with permission to land upon the coasts and shores of those colonies and the islands thereof, and also upon the Magdalen Islands, for the purpose of drying their nets and curing their fish : provided that, in so doing, they do not interfere with the rights of private property, or with British fishermen, in the peaceable use of any part of the said coast in their occupancy for the same purpose.

It is understood that the above-mentioned liberty applies solely to the sea fishery, and that the salmon and shad fisheries, and all fisheries in rivers, and the mouths of rivers, are hereby reserved, exclusively, for British fishermen.

And it is further agreed, that in order to prevent or settle any disputes as to the places to which the reservation of exclusive right to British fishermen, contained in this article, and that of fishermen of the United States, contained in the next succeeding article, apply, each of the high contracting parties, on the application of either to the other, shall, within six months thereafter, appoint a commissioner. The said commissioners, before proceeding to any business, shall make and subscribe a solemn declaration that they will impartially and carefully examine and decide, to the best of their judgment,

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