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Same Subject, concluded,

79. St. Peter's Church, at Rome,

83. Eruption of the Volcano of Kilauea,

84. A Scene at Sea,

Scene in the Catskill Mountains,

88. The Bible,

89. The Blind Preacher,

91. Bepuvolence of God,

. 194

Mellen. 200

. Kotzebue. 201

Channing. 205

Anon. 211

. 215

Irving. 217

. 222

Todd. 224

227

Cooper. 230

Whitllesey. 237

Ware. 240

Cooper. 244

Sprague. 250

Anon. 253

256

Dewey. 259

Coan. 266

Leggett. 272

Mellen. 283

Judson. 284

Wirt. 286

Chalmers. 290

87.

.

.327

.

. 337

92. Decisive Integrity,

Wirt. 292

94. Duties of Youth,

Channing. 297

95. Female Accomplishinents,

Hannah More. 301

96. Feinale Education,

Story. 302

97. Female Piety,

Anon. 304

99. Influence of Superior Minds, ·

Sprague. 309

100. Duty of Literary Men to their Country,

Grimke. 310

101. The Object of Astronomy,

Dick. 312

102. Number and Magnitude of the Stars,

314

105. Considerations for the Young,

Haucs. 318

106. The Loss of National Character,

Maxcy. 321

107. Our Obligations as Citizens,

Knowles. 322

103. The Just Judge,

Anon. 323

109. Character of Mr. Brougham,

112. Self-Instruction,

Clark. 331

113. Washington's Resignation,

Ramsey. 333

114. One Century after Washington,

117. Exordium of a Speech,

Webster. 313.

118. Eulogy on Hamilton,

Mason. 315

119. Lafayette's Last Visit to this Country,

Headley. 346

121. Eloquence,

122. Ames' Speech on the British Treaty,

354

123. Keeping up Appearances,

. 356

124 Formation of Character, .

Mrs. Tuthill. 359

127 Scotland . :.

Flagg. 364

128 The Character of Greene,

Headley. 366

129 Contribution of the New World to the Old,

Webster. 370

131 Intellectual Qualities of Milton,

Channing. 375

134. Extract from President Jefferson's Inaugural Address,

384

135 Reflections on the Death of Adams and Jefferson,

Webster. 386

137 Extract from Emmet's Speech,

138. In favor of the Greek Revolution,

Clay. 394

139. Speech of the Earl of Chatham,

141. Tribute to Washington,

. 399

142. Speech on the Question of War with England, Patrick Henry. 400

143. Industry necessary to form the Orator,

Ware. 403

145. Improvement of Time,

Bonhote. 407

. 351

... 391

. 395

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POETRY.

.

5. The Pilgrims,
9. The Cherokee's Lament,
10. Two Hundred Years Ago, .
19. Night in Eden, .
22. Westminster Abbey,
27. Ode on Education,
33. Ursa Major,
36. The Gray Forest Eagle,
41. Mount Monadnock,

Mrs. Sigourney. 84

Anon. 92

Mellen. 93
Mrs. Evans, 114

Lester. 120
Montgomery. 131

Ware. 143

Street. 153
Peabody. 166

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ARTICULATION. ARTICULATION consists in giving to every letter its appropriate sound, and to every syllable and word a proper and distinctive utterance.

Articulation being the basis of all correct elocution, the beauty and harmony of conve

nversation, of reading, and of oratory, depend perhaps in a greater degree upon this than upon any other principle. The student, therefore, who aspires to the distinction of being a correct and impressive speaker, may be assured that he cannot study it too minutely, or with too untiring perseverance.

Indeed, however readily he may pronounce the words of a sentence, or vary his tones and inflections, he cannot be called an effective and interesting reader or speaker, unless there be joined with these, a clear and distinct enunciation.

To aid him in the attainment of this, the following rules and tables are introduced.

Rule 1. A clear and distinct articulation should be given to the elementary sounds, employed in vocal utterance.

QUESTIONS. What are the general divisions of Part First ? What is articulation ? Of what is it the basis? How should it be studied? What is Rule First ?

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Name. 1 A 2 A 3 A 4 A 5 E 6 E 7 I 8 I 90 10 O 11 0 12 U 13 U 14 U 15 OU

Arm
All
At
Eat
Bet
Ice
It
Ode
Do
Ox
Sue
Up
Full
Out

А
A
A
Ē
E
Ī
I
Ō
ö
0

Name. 21 M 22 N 23 R 24 V 25 W 26 Y 27 Z 28 Z 29 Th

Power. Element
Him M
Run N
Bur R
Ev

V
Woe W
Yet Y
Buzz Z
Azure Z
Thy TH
Sing Ng

30 Ng

ASPIRATES.

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31 P Up
32 T It
33 K,€ Ark
34 Ch Much
35 H He
36 F If
37 Wh When
38 S,C

Sin
39 Sh Fish
40 Th Thin

B

SUB-VOCALS. 16 B Ebb 17 D Odd 18 G Egg 19 J,Ġ Jet 20 L Ill

T
K
Ch
H
F
Wh
S
Sh
Th

D

G
J
L

* This tabular view of elementary sounds is introduced to exercise the pupil in the elements of the language. By most elocutionists they are considered to be forty in number; consisting of vocals, sub-vocals and aspirates.

The class, either individually or in concert, may first pronounce the word containing the element, and then the element itself.

This exercise should be continued, from time to time, until the sounds can be perfectly uttered.

QUESTIONS. For what is the first table introduced? What is its subject? How many and which are vocals. 3. Sub-vocals ? Aspirates ?

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