England in 1819: The Politics of Literary Culture and the Case of Romantic Historicism

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University of Chicago Press, 1999. jún. 26. - 606 oldal
1819 was the annus mirabilis for many British Romantic writers, and the annus terribilis for demonstrators protesting the state of parliamentary representation. In 1819 Keats wrote what many consider his greatest poetry. This was the year of Shelley's Prometheus Unbound, The Cenci, and Ode to the West Wind. Wordsworth published his most widely reviewed work, Peter Bell, and the craze for Walter Scott's historical novels reached its zenith. Many of these writings explicitly engaged with the politics of representation in 1819, especially the great movement for reform that was fueled by threats of mass emigration to America and came to a head that August with an unprovoked attack on unarmed men, women, and children in St. Peter's Field, Manchester, a massacre that journalists dubbed "Peterloo." But the year of Peterloo in British history is notable for more than just the volume, value, and topicality of its literature. Much of the writing from 1819, argues James Chandler, was acutely aware not only of its place in history, but also of its place as history - a realization of a literary "spirit of the age" that resonates strongly with the current "return to history" in literary studies. Chandler explores the ties between Romantic and contemporary historicism, such as the shared tendency to seize a single dated event as both important on its own and as a "case" testing general principles. To animate these issues, Chandler offers a series of cases of his own built around key texts from 1819.
 

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Tartalomjegyzék

Section One Writing Historicism Then and
49
Chapter
94
Chapter Three
155
Chapter Four
203
Interchapter
267
Chapter Five
303
Chapter
350
Keats and the History of Psyche
389
Godwinian Theory in the Newest of New Worlds
463
The Mystery of Generation
466
Keats and the Humanity of the United States
469
Poetry Utility Representation
477
Section Two Sublime Casuistry
481
Chapter Nine The Case of The Case of Shelley
483
A Defense of Shelley
490
Casuistry in The Cenci
498

Smokeability
395
Mary Tighe and the Tenses of History
402
Rehabilitating Psyche
409
The Politics of SoulMaking
417
The Week When Keats Wrote To Autumn
425
Keatss Literary Imperialism
432
Western Settlements English Writers and the Case of U S Culture
441
Washington Irving and the English Writers on America
449
The English Columbus
454
Anxieties of Exodus
459
Requisites of Historical Judgment
507
A Second Look at Peter Bell the Third
515
The West Wind and the Poets Work
525
Lyricism and Historicism
529
A Revolution in the Turns of Season
532
The Elementary Case
541
The Absent Cause
545
Fallen Leaves
549
Index
555
Copyright

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A szerzőről (1999)

James Chandler is the Barbara E. and Richard J. Franke Distinguished Service Professor in the Department of English Language and Literature and chair of the Department of Cinema and Media Studies at the University of Chicago. He is the author of several books, including England in 1819: The Politics of Literary Culture and the Case of Romantic Historicism, also published by the University of Chicago Press.

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