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Mr. Wilson also published “ A Sermon, preached at the Assizes at Lancaster, August 19, 1787, before Lord Loughborough and the then Mr. Justice Wilson," 4to.

He died March 3, 1813; and was buried in the church at Clitheroe: where a monument has been thus affectionately inscribed by his grateful Scholars:

R

A, Ω.
THOMÆ WILSON, S. T. B.

ECCLESIÆ DE CLAUGHTON RECTORI;
SACELLORUM DE CLITHERÆ ET DOWNHAM MINISTRO,

ET IN VICINO GYMNASIO
PER ANNOS FERME DUODEQUADRAGINTA
LITERARUM HUMANIORUM MAGISTRO,

ABSQUE FUCO ET FASTU ERUDITO,

JUVENTUTI SINE PLAGIS REGENDÆ NATO;
ET INTER DOCENDUM MALE DICERE AUT SÆVIRE NESCIO,

(você, VULTU, INDOLE, PLACIDISSIMIS,) QVI, PLURIMIS IN ECCLESIAM INQUE R. P. DISCIPULIS EMISSIS,

NEMINEM NON SIBI SODALEM ALLEXERAT,

NEMINE NON USUS EST AMICO,
AB IISDEM UNDEQUAQUE CONGREGATIS
GRATO QUOTANNIS EXCEPTUS CONVIVIO

(HEU! NUNQUAM REDITURO)
CONVICTOR IPSE JUCUNDISSIMUS
SERMONE COMTO, FACETO, VERBORUM
LUSIBUS SEU SCINTILLULIS, NITENTI,

INNOCUO, TAMEN, COMI, PIO,

ANNOS NATO LXV. DENATO.
V. NON. MART. A. D. MDCCCXIII.
SEPULTO BOLTONÆ JUXTA BOWLAND,

PROPE CONJUGEM PRÆREPTAM,
CENOTAPHIUM, UBI VIVUS FLORUERAT

L. L. M. P. P.
DISCIPULI.

“ There will soon appear a new Edition of my Poetical Biography. If you will accept of a copy to keep me in your mind, bc pleased to let me know how it may be conveniently conveyed to you. The present is small, but it is given with good-will by, reverend Sir, your most obliged and most humble servant,

Sam. Johnson."

The

The Rev. WILLIAM SMITH, , of Queen's College, Oxford, M. A. 1685, was Rector of St. John's Nevis 1716-1721; where the usual salary was sixteen thousand pound weight of Muscovado, or coarse sugar annually, three pounds, or five hundred weight of sugar, for a funeral sermon, and twelve shillings and sixpence for every christening, marriage, and burial ; in the case of Mr. Smith, the Vestry of St. John's gave 30l. more than the above salary.

He was afterwards Rector of St. Mary's in Bedford; and published " A Natural History of Nevis, and the rest of the English Leeward Charibee Islands in America * ; with many Observations on Nature and Art; particularly, an Introduction to the Art of Decyphering. In Eleven Letters, to the Reverend Mr. Mason, B. D. Woodwardian Professor, and Fellow of Trinity College in Cambridge, 1745,” Svo.

The Rev. Charles HAWTREYF, M. A. raised a controversy, which lasted but a short time, upon the subject of The Divinity of the Son of God, intituled, Θεανθρωπος της καινής Διαθήκης, in which William Lord Bp. of Chester, Principal of Brazenose, and his successor in the Principality, Frodsham Hodson, A. M. took a part, and which was closed in 1796 by a second publication of Hawtrey's, intituled, * A particular Enquiry into the Doctrine of an Eternal Filiation.'

* In that work Mr. Smith says, “ One Mr. Power, a Cantabrigian, who was a predecessor of mine in the Rectory of St. John's at Nevis, wrote a Poem called “ The Sugar-cane;" which was looked upon there as a curious work, and as such (after his death) sent home hither to his Relations. But I believe it was never printed : for, on my return to England, I inade a particular enquiry after it of Mr. Rivington, of St. Paul's Church-yard, and of many other London Booksellers, but in vain. However, the subject was a field enough for the finest of Poets to expatiate upon;"--and has been performed in a masterly manner by Mr. Grainger. (See some account of this Mr. Power in the former part of this volume, p. so.) † See the “ Literary Anecdotes," vol. III. p.701: vol. IX. 569.

Original

Original Letter from the late Sir John DalryMPLE,

Bart. Author of the “ Memoirs of Great Britain,"
&c. &c. &c. to the late Admiral DALRYMPLE.
“ MY DEAR SIR,

Cranston, Jan. 1, 1772. Your shirts are safe. I have made many attempts upon them; but Bess, who has in honesty what she wants in temper, keeps them in safety for you.

You ask me, what I have been doing? To the best of my memory, what has passed since I came home is as follows:

" Finding the roof bad, I sent slaters, at the peril of their necks, to repair it. They mended three holes, and made thirty themselves.

“ I pulled down as many walls round the house as would have fortified a town. This was in summer : But now, that winter is come, I would give all the money to put them up again, that it cost me to take them down.

“I thought it would give a magnificent air to the hall, to throw the passage into it. After it was done, I went out of town to see how it looked. It was night when I went into it; the wind blew out the candle from the over-size of the room; upon which, I ordered the partition to be built up again, that I might not die of cold in the midst of summer,

“I ordered the old timber to be thinned; to which, perhaps, the love of lucre a little contributed. The workmen, for every tree they cut, destroyed three, by letting them fall on each other. I received a momentary satisfaction from hearing that the carpenter I employed had cut off his thumb in felling a tree. But this pleasure was soon allayed, when, upon examining his measure, I found that he had measured false, and cheated me of 20 per cent.

“ Instead of saddle-horses I bought mares, and had them covered with an Arabian. When I went, some months after, to mount them, the groom told me, I should kill the foals; and now I walk on foot, with the stable full of horses, unless when, with much humility, I ask to be admitted into the chaise, which is generally refused me.

“ Remembering, with a pleasing complacency, the Watcombe pigs, I paid thirty shillings for a sow with pig. My wife

starved them. They ran over to a madman, called Lord Adam Gordon, who distrained them for damage; and the mother, with ten helpless infants, died of bad usage.

"Loving butter much, and cream more, I bought two Dutch cows, and had plenty of both. I made my wife a present of two more: she learned the way to market for their produce; and I have never got a bowl of cream since.

“I made a fine hay-stack; but quarreled with my wife as to the manner of drying the hay, and building the stack. The haystack took fire ; by which I had the double mortification of losing my hay, and finding my wife had more sense than myself.

“I kept

“I kept no plough ;, for which I thank my Maker; because then I must have wrote this Letter from a gaol.

** I paid twenty pounds for a dung-hill, because I was told it was a good thing; and, now, I would give any body twenty shillings to tell me what to do with it.

“ I built, and stocked a pigeon-house ; lvut the cats watched below, the hawks hovered above; and pigeon-soup, roasted pigeon, or cold pigeon-pie, have I never seen since.

“ I fell to drain a piece of low ground behind the house ; but I hit upon the tail of the rock, and drained the well of the house; by which I can get no water for my victuals.

“ I entered into a great project for selling lime, upon a promise from one of my own farmers to give me land off his farm. But when I went to take off the ground, he laughed, said he had choused the Lawyer, and exposed me to a dozen law-suits for breach of bargains, which I could not perform.

“ 1 fattened black cattle and sheep; but could not agree with the butchers about the price. From mere economy, we eat them ourselves, and almost killed all the family with surfeits.

“I bought two score of six-year old wethers for my own table; but a butcher, who rented one of the fields, put my mark upon his own carrion sheep; by which I have been living upon carrion all the summer.

“I brewed much beer ; but the small turned sour, and the servants drank all the strong.

“ I found a ghost in the house, whose name was M-Alister, a pedlar, that had been killed in one of the rooms at the top of the house two centuries ago. No servant would go on an errand after the sun was set, for fear of M°Alister, which obliged me to set off one set of my servants. Soon after the housekeeper, your old friend Mrs. Brown, died, aged 90 ; and then the belief ran, that another ghost was in the house, upon which many of the new set of servants begged leave to quit the house, and got it.

“ In one thing only I have succeeded. I have quarreled with all my neighbours; so that, with a dozen gentlemen's seats in my view, i stalk alone like a lion in a desart.

"I thought I should have been happy with my tenants, because I could be insolent to them without their being insolent to me. But they paid me no rent; and in a few days I shall have above one half of the very few friends I have in the country in a prison.

“Such being the pleasures of a country life, I intend to quit them all in about a month, to submit to the mortification of spending the spring in London, where, I am happy to hear, we are to meet. But I am infinitely happier to hear, that Mrs. Dalrymple is doing so weil. May God preserve her long to you! for, she is a fine creature.

“ Just when I was going to you last spring, I received a Letter from Bess, that she was dying. I put off my journey to Watcombe, and almost killed myself with posting to Scotland, where I found Madam in perfect good health.

“ Yours always, my dear Jack, John DALRYMPLE."

LETTERS TO DR. RICHARDSON,

Continued from p. 416.

From Dr. THOMAS SHORT *. DEAR AND WORTHY SIR, Sheffield, July 24, 1730. “ Having occasion last Friday to be with Dr. Chambers of Hull, who told me he had sent you the Catalogue of the Books to be sold in Holland next September, he ordered me to send to you for it; and limited me to a loan not exceeding two days, and then return it to him, none of his friends in that country having yet had the perusal of it. I beg, therefore, you would please to send it by bearer, and I will take care to send it him safe in good time. I have returned you your three books by bearer, with hearty thanks for the perusal, wherein I have been much longer than I intended, having had a hurry of other business on my hands. I hope you will remember the Book of Plants you promised me; but I am not to expect any of the very Succulent Herbs in it, they still rotting before they be dried. Í have sent herewith my Discourse on Tea, &c., which, with sincere thanks and acknowledgment of all former favours, please to accept from, dear and worthy Sir, &c. Tho. SHORT."

“ DEAR AND WORTHY SIR, Sheffield, April 3, 1731. “My long silence you are to impute to my uncertainty whether you was at home, or at Preston, this Winter; neither do I know whether this will find you or not; but, if it do, as soon as I have had a line from you I intend to wait upon you, and see how far on your Gardens and my Book of Herbs are. We have had a very healthy Winter here; only one thing remarkable I shall tell you. About four miles from this, in Derbyshire, several persons have had the misfortune to hurt themselves, some by a scratch of a briar, some by a fall on ploughed land, some by ruffling the skin off their leg a little — all of them, to the number of four or five, have had the parts either mortify or imposthumate ; and a violent fever has ensued on the third or fourth day, whereof they have all died in three days more; and nobody else has had the misfortune of either mortifications, imposthumations, or fever. This I submit to your philosophy to account for. Tho. Short.” “ WORTHY SIR,

Sheffield, July 17, 1731. “ Favoured with your kind letter of May 24th. I am sorry I was disappointed in meeting you at home, but I have had much business on my hands ever since, so as I could not do myself the pleasure of seeing you again, and we have now such a crowd of new Physicians coming and come to this country, that I dare not at present take any pleasure-rides. I am obliged to you for the specimen of the Plant you mention in yours, and especially for your useful observations on it, but hope it will not be preserved alone. I am, Sir, &c.

Tho. SHORT. * A Physician at Sheffield. See “ Literary Anecdotes," vol. I. p. 457. VOL. I.

3 F

“ WORTHY

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