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travel, is stored up in the memory for the sake of winning a smile from the home circle.

Lady Thornbury's home, however, awoke no feelings of this kind, and the regrets with which she parted from her friends was unmixed with any pleasure at the idea of returning to Woodside Manor. She felt thoroughly depressed in mind and body as she drove up the long avenue and entered the lofty hall.

Maude, too, was tired with her journey, and with the exertions she had made to amuse and rouse Eleanor; and she also fancied the old hall and the dark panelled dining room looked more than usually gloomy, contrasted with the gay little sitting room and Tom's bright, cheery face, to which they had lately become accustomed.

Mr. and Mrs. Ferne were well pleased to allow their daughter to remain at Woodside Manor.

“For you know,” Mrs. Ferne had remarked, " though winter is the most expensive time of the year, and her fire would have made a difference in the coal bill, still there's the butter -really Tom does eat such a quantity, though I tell him every day he will spoil his complexion,” and adding, with a sigh, “ boys are so unlike girls—Eleanor never did eat much, and her going away has not made the difierence in the bills that I calculated upon."

Maude cared little about the reason why; but she felt very glad that she was allowed to remain with her cousin, and the approaching winter looked less dreary to Eleanor when she knew that it would be spent in Maude's society.

Eleanor could no longer maintain her rigid seclusion, after the expiration of the first year of her widowhood, nor did she altogether wish to do so, and numbers of visitors made their appearance at Woodside Manor, as soon as the report of her return home was circulated through the vicinity, and many were the comments on the lovely young widow; some

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travel, is stored up in the memory for the sake of winning a smile from the home circle.

Lady Thornbury's home, however, awoke no feelings of this kind, and the regrets with which she parted from her friends was unmixed with any pleasure at the idea of returning to Woodside Manor. She felt thoroughly depressed in mind and body as she drove up the long avenue and entered the lofty hall.

Maude, too, was tired with her journey, and with the exertions she had made to amuse and rouse Eleanor; and she also fancied the old hall and the dark panelled dining room looked more than usually gloomy, contrasted with the gay little sitting room and Tom's bright, cheery face, to which they had lately become accustomed.

Mr. and Mrs. Ferne were well pleased to allow their daughter to remain at Woodside Manor.

“For you know,” Mrs. Ferne had remarked, " though winter is the most expensive time of the year, and her fire would have made a difference in the coal bill, still there's the butter --really Tom does eat such a quantity, though I tell him every day he will spoil his complexion,” and adding, with a sigh, “ boys are so unlike girls—Eleanor never did eat much, and her going away has not made the difierence in the bills that I calculated upon."

Maude cared little about the reason why; but she felt very glad that she was allowed to remain with her cousin, and the approaching winter looked less dreary to Eleanor when she knew that it would be spent in Maude's society.

Eleanor could no longer maintain her rigid seclusion, after the expiration of the first year of her widowhood, nor did she altogether wish to do so, and numbers of visitors made their appearance at Woodside Manor, as soon as the report of her return home was circulated through the vicinity, and many were the comments on the lovely young widow; some averring she had never looked more beautiful in her brightest days, and others almost wishing to tear off those heavy rolls of muslin which partially concealed those well remembered shining tresses of raven blackness; but all were rejoiced that Woodside, and its fascinating mistress were once more restored to the neighbourhood, and the park never looked to greater advantage than in the early summer, when the beech grove was in perfection with its varied tints just mellowing the extreme green.

A letter from Mr. Ferris two or three days after their return, was by no means acceptable to Lady Thornbury; she had escaped seeing him during her visit to Oak Cottage—having ascertained beforehand that he was absent on business in Ireland; but business was unavoidable, and must be attended to, and under Eleanor's peculiar circumstances, in regard to Mr. Ferris, who really acted as her steward, it was deemed expedient by both the cousins

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