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Ladies, Hints to young. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
, Study for . . . . . . . . . . . - - - -
Lady of the Governor of Vermont........
Louisa . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Love, reciprocal ......... - - - - - - -
Life, the Discipline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Living and Dying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -
Learning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - -
Leisure Hours. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Maternity. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Maternal Effort. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Married State, on the.................
Malton, England. . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Morning Air . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Music of the Morning.........
Mother, the Indian. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
and her Children................
Moore, Ellen......... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Morrison, Temptations of Rachel.........
Midnight Meditations...................
Milton. . . . . . 197,
Museums, Rise of... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Cecilia, to. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - -

Christian Soldier, must we sever......... -

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Creation and Redemption ...............
Chieftain's Return...... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
Christmas Hymn...................... -
Crucifixion, on viewing the Picture of the..
Child, on the Death of a...... ...........

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Quaker Meeting, the .................... 39

Requited Love . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ..........

Repentance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Reading, Pa.... • - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Religion. . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Red Sea, Passage of the .................

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Daughter, on her leaving Switzerland, to my
Daughter's Dream, the . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - -
Dew-drop and the Stream......... - - - - - - -
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Drumore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - -
Dissolution, approaching. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Discontent........ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Dove, O spare that.......
Days of Youth . . . . . . . . . . . . - e - - - - - - - - - - e.

, to. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - -

Evening...... • e - e. e. e - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Contemplation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Earthquake, the . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Friend, Stanzas to a ........... - - - - - - - -

to the Year 1838. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Female Beauty................. - - - - - - - Flowers, Hymn to the...................

Girlhood......................... - e - - - e. Go and enjoy the narrow span ........... Grave of the broken Heart ...............

Heart, the human . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Husband's Remembrance, the . . . . . . . . . . . . Husband, the poor Wife's Appeal to him... Hebrew Maiden, veil thy Beauty......... Hair, Lines on a Lock of...... • - e s e - - - - Home..... - - - - - - - - - - - - - . . . . . . . . . . . 176, - , the Landscape at: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . > COIsle . . . . . . . . . . . . • * * * * * * * * * * * * - e Harp, my..... - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Hermitess, the. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Household Woman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

I saw two Clouds at Morning ............ I saw thee in the Morm of Life. . . . . . . . . . I heard thy Death without a Tear......... Interview, the . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lines written in an Album ..............
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Lady, Lines to a...... e
Landscape at Home....
Life. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
List up thine eyes, afflicted soul ..........
Letter, the unopened....... • - e. e. e. e. e. e - e. e. e. e.
Ledyard's Praise of Woman....... - - - - - -

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Married Couple, the new ................
Mary B
Memory. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Mariner, the wrecked....................

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Sabbath Morn, the..... . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - Sunday in the Country....... - - - - - - - - - - Summer Months, the..... . . . . . . . . . . . . - - Spring, the first wild Note of.......... - - , a Morning in. . . . . . . . . . . . . School-boy Sport. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Shower, Sunset after a . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Snow-storm, the . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - - - - - - - - Sister, on the Death of a...... - - - - - - - - - - , on her Birth-day, to my ........... Song, a farewell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Soul, the . . . . . . . . . . . . - - - - - - • * * * * * * * * * * * Soldier, the Christian........ - - - - - - - - - - - Scriptures, Hymn to the..... . . . . . . . . . . . .

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vent the risk of collision between them and the citizens, to whom they were, as a matter of course, particularly obnoxious. The commanding officer on the station, at the period of the following incident, was a man peculiarly unfitted, by inclination at least, for the duties imposed on him by the impressment proceedings, being of a most humane and kind disposition. He was, besides, a native of Leith, where he resided in a house of his own, unless when his presence was necessarily required on board. He had also a private room in the round house (as it may be termed) above mentioned, where he attended with great punctuality, in order that his presence might prove a check to the brutal and licentious natures of the “pressgang,” the most reckless and desperate characters amongst the crew, being as is well known always selected for the worse than slave-traffic in which they were employed. In the above room, then, Captain Gillespie was seated one evening, when he was informed that a gentleman desired to speak with him, and, at his desire, the stranger was introduced. He was evidently a mere youth, slightly and elegantly made, and was very fashionably dressed. Captain Gillespie was particularly struck with the handsome, and as he thought, feminine cast of his features— a peculiarity that corresponded well with the soft and silvery tones of his voice, when after considerable hesitation, he stated the purpose of his visit. This was no other than to request that he might be taken on board a manof-war to serve as a common sailor! Captain Gillespie expressed no little astonishment at one of his tender age and elegant appearance having adopted so strange a resolution, and begged to question him as to his motives for so doing—whether he had reflected suffi

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ciently on the consequences of such a step, the hardships he must endure, and so forth. The youth declined giving any explanation on these points, and merely reiterated his determination of entering the navy. The worthy officer was exceedingly moved at the youth's situation. He was evidently of a superior rank in life, had been carefully and delicately brought up; and his replies showed that he knew nothing at all of the world. The Captain, however, secretly felt more compassion than surprise at the circumstance. He knew that instances were then of frequent occurrence, of young men of the very best families, whose ardent and untutored imaginations were blown into enthusiasm by the inflated and high colored accounts every day put forth of our splendid naval triumphs, and with heads filled with visions of glory, and hearts with patriotism, leaving all the comforts and elegancies of home behind, little dreaming of the rough ordeal they must undergo in the path of eminence or glory. Such an instance did the kind-hearted officer conclude was now before him; and knowing from experience all the rough realities of his profession, he endeavored to persuade the young enthusiast to abandon, or at least postpone his resolution ; but finding all his arguments unavailing, he determined to give him a foretaste, at least of the sort of ‘company he would have to associate with on board. When the junior, therefore, came on shore to relieve him for the night, he ordered him to lock the young man in the same apartment with the rascals of the “pressgang;” and directed, also, that he should be brought to his house the next morning at breakfast time. The youth accordingly appeared at the appointed hour, and Captain Gillespie saw, at a glance, that the experiment he had tried had not been without its effect, or rather that it had succeeded much beyond what he intended. In fact, he was shocked at the altera. tion which he saw in the young man's features since the preceding evening, and almost repented the plan he had put in practice. He

shook him kindly by the hand, and then, in:

as indifferent a tone as he could assume, requested to know if he still adhered to his determination of becoming a sailor. For a while the young man sat mute and rigid as marble, and seemed totally unconscious of the meaning of the words addressed to him, but at last fell on his knees before Captain Gillespie, and in a passion of tears and sobs, so violent as seemed almost to rend his frame, disclosed what his compassionate hearer had already begun distinctly to suspect—that the unhappy young creature before him was a female ! Captain Gillespie raised the supplicant be

fore him, and endeavored to soothe her by all the persuasion he was master of, but it was long before he succeeded. When at length she became composed enough to speak, she frankly told her short and simple tale. She was the youngest daughter of a gentleman of considerable property in a neighboring county. About six months previous to the indiscretion of which she had been guilty, a young relative, a lieutenant in the navy, had obtained leave for a short visit to her father's house. The young officer had but lately obtained his commission, was consequently in high spirits, and being quite an enthusiast in his profession, could speak of nothing else but the scenes and battles—for he had already seen a deal of hard fighting— in which he had been engaged, depicting them of course in the most glowing colors that a young and ardent imagination could suggest. In these details, although listened to with due attention, and perhaps interest, by the rest of the family, the young sailor found none, who evidently sympathised, as it were, with his own feelings but the youngest of his cousins, of whom there were four, all daughters. It was natural, therefore, that he should show a preference to her company in comparison with her sisters, although his predilection arose solely from the vain glorious pleasure of having a ready, a delighted listener. Any thing like love addresses he had never once offered to her, (and it afterwards, indeed, appeared that his affections were pre-engaged,) but his buoyant spirits, and joyous language—his aspirations after naval fame—his handsome and animated countenance, together with the decided partiality he displayed for her society—all these wrought upon the young and simple girl's imagination, to a degree of which she was not herself conscious until he was gone. It was then, and for the first time, she felt how much her happiness was at the disposal of another, and what a dreary blank the world appeared without his presence. Time, perhaps, might have enabled her to regain her equanimity, but she was subject to distress from other sources. Her father, a cold, austere man, a stern disciplinarian in his family, and who regarded any unbending from that rigid demeanor of stately and ceremonious reserve which was the rule of his own deportment, as alike an infraction of moral propriety and a derogation from his rank— had observed with swelling indignation his daughter's artless admiration of her cousin, and, at the departure of the latter, let loose the full measure of his wrath upon her. Her sisters, too, whose minds were formed on their father's model, and burned, moreover, with spite and jealousy, at the preference shown by any eligible and marriageable man

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