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shall or may be stranded on or near the coasts of the Papel country aforesaid; and in the event of any vessel being wrecked on or near the coasts of the Papel country every assistance shall be rendered by the King of the said country and the natives thereof, to save the cargo of the said vessel, and to deliver the cargo so saved, or such part thereof as may be saved, to the nearest European settlement, to be retained by the Governor thereof until claimed by the rightful

Owner or owners.

IV. It is further agreed, on the part of the King of the Papel country aforesaid, his Chiefs and headmen, for themselves, their heirs and successors, that on no account whatever shall any ransom be claimed for the liberation of any persons who may be shipwrecked from any vessel lost on or near the coasts of the Papel country aforesaid, nor will they suffer any of the natives of the said Papel country to claim or demand any sum or sums of money as ransom for the liberation of the persons above described.

V. It is further agreed, on the part of the King of the Papel country aforesaid, his Chiefs and headmen, for themselves, their heirs and successors, that every protection in his and their power shall be afforded to all British traders while in any part of the Papel country, and that no customs whatever shall be demanded by the King of the said country, or any of the natives thereof, from British vessels trading to the Papel country aforesaid.

VI. It is further agreed, on the part of the King of the Papel country aforesaid, his Chiefs and headmen, for themselves, their heirs and successors, that every exertion shall be used by himself, his Chiefs, headmen, and natives of the Papel country aforesaid, to influence the Bajouga and other tribes, to bring all persons who may have been shipwrecked from any vessels, together with their property, to the nearest European settlement; and further to use every exertion with the said natives to prevent any vessel stranded on any of the coasts of the said country or countries being plundered; and also to prevent any sum or sums of money being claimed by the natives aforesaid as ransom for the liberation of any person or persons wrecked from any vessel on or near their coasts.

VII. It is further agreed, on the part of the King of the Papel country aforesaid, his Chiefs and headmen, for themselves, their heirs and successors, that there shall be furnished by the King of the Papel country aforesaid, and sent to the acting Governor of the settlement of Bathurst aforesaid, as hostages, 2 of the children of the said King, and 2 of the children of each of the 2 principal Chiefs of the Papel country aforesaid, who shall be considered as pledges on the part of the King, Chiefs, and headmen of the Papel country aforesaid, for the due and faithful performance of his and their part of this present Treaty.

VIII. It is further agreed, on the part of Lieutenant Charles Horace Lapidge, of the Royal Navy, commanding Her Majesty's brig Pantaloon, on behalf of Thomas Lewis Ingram, Esquire, acting Governor of the Settlement of Bathurst and its dependencies in the River Gambia, for Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, her heirs and successors, that if any expenses be incurred by the King of the Papel country, or any of the natives of the said country, in sending back any person or persons to a European settlement who may have been wrecked from any vessel as aforesaid, all reasonable disbursements shall be repaid; also that, if any expenses be incurred in saving or conveying a cargo saved from a vessel so wrecked as aforesaid to any European settlements, such reasonable expenses shall be paid to the King or natives of the country aforesaid.

IX. It is further agreed, on the part of Lieutenant Charles Horace Lapidge, of the Royal Navy, commanding Her Majesty's brig Pantaloon, on behalf of Thomas Lewis Ingram, Esquire, acting Governor of the settlement of Bathurst and its dependencies in the River Gambia aforesaid, for Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, her heirs and successors, that the King of the Papel country aforesaid, and the natives thereof, or the natives of the Bajouga and other tribes, as the case may be, shall be entitled to receive one-fourth of all goods saved by either of them from all vessels that may be wrecked on or near either or any of their coasts; but it shall be deemed necessary that the whole of the goods so saved shall be conveyed with all possible dispatch to Bissao, or the nearest European settlement, to be sold by auction, or be divided, as may be directed by the owner or owners, or, in his or their absence, by his or their agent or agents, or by the Governor of the settlement aforesaid, to which the said goods so saved shall be conveyed.

X. It is further agreed, on the part of Lieutenant Charles Horace Lapidge, of the Royal Navy commanding Her Majesty's brig Pantaloon, on behalf of Thomas Lewis Ingram, Esquire, acting Governor of the settlement of Bathurst, and its dependencies in the River Gambia aforesaid, for Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, her heirs and successors, that the hostages sent by the King of the Papel country as pledges for the due performance of his part of this present Treaty, shall be maintained and educated by and at the expense of the Government of the British settlements in the River Gambia, and shall be exchanged for others, if the said acting Governor, or his successor in office, shall deem others more likely to cause the strict adherence of the said King, Chiefs, and headmen of the Papel country aforesaid, to the foregoing conditions of this present Treaty.

It is lastly agreed, on the part of Lieutenant Charles Horace Lapidge, of the Royal Navy, commanding Her Majesty's brig Pantaloon, on behalf of Thomas Lewis Ingram, Esquire, acting Governor of the settlement of Bathurst, and its dependencies in the River Gambia aforesaid, for Her Majesty the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, her heirs and successors, that on condition of the King of the Papel country aforesaid performing in every respect the conditions aforesaid contained in this present Treaty, and complying with them in every respect, the 23 prisoners captured on the 16th day of February last by Her Majesty's brig Pantaloon, shall be restored to freedom.

(Inserted after a Conference with the King at Bissao.)

XI. Article VII is annulled; and it is agreed, in consideration of the Treaty being signed, that the 2 Papels on board shall be released, and that his Excellency the Governor of the settlement of Bathurst will restore as many of the 21 Papels as he may deem prudent, and if any are retained it will be for 2 years, and then to be exchanged for others.

Dated at the Fort of Bissao this 1st day of April, 1842.

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These Signatures of the King's sons, and officers of Her Majesty's brig Pantaloon, were signed on board, this 1st day of April, 1842. MANOEL DE SILVA, Interpreter.

(15.)-TREATY with the Chiefs of Nyanibantang.-Signed at MacCarthy's Island, December 31, 1842.

AGREEMENT entered into by Acting-Governor Ingram, on the part of Her Majesty's Government, and Sandebar, Chief of Nyanibantang.

OBJECT.

THERE shall be peace and friendship between the people of England and the people of Nyanibantang, and the Slave Trade shall be put down for ever in Nyanibantang, and the people of England and the people of Nyanibantang shall trade together innocently, justly, kindly, and usefully; and the said Acting-Governor, for the Queen of England, and the said Sandebar, for himself and the people of Nyanibantang, do make the following agreement for these purposes:

TERMS.

I. No white Christian persons shall be made slaves in the Nyanibantang country, or in any case; and if any white Christians are now slaves in the Nyanibantang country, or shall be brought into it as slaves, they shall instantly be set free by the Chief of Nyanibantang, and he shall assist them to return to their own country.

II. No persons of any colour, or wherever born, shall be taken out of the Nyanibantang country as slaves; and no person in the Nyanibantang country shall be in any way concerned in seizing, keeping, carrying, or sending away persons for the purpose of their being taken out of the Nyanibantang country as slaves; and the Chief of Nyanibantang shall punish severely those who break this law.

III. The officers of the Queen of England may seize every vessel or boat of Nyanibantang found anywhere carrying on the trade in slaves, and may also seize every vessel or boat of other nations found carrying on the trade in slaves in the waters belonging to the Chief of Nyanibantang; and the vessels and boat so seized shall be taken to an English possession, to be tried by English law; and when condemned shall be sold, and the produce of the sale shall be equally divided between the Queen of England and the Chief of Nyanibantang, and the slaves who were found on board shall be made free.

IV. English people may freely come into the Nyanibantang country, and may stay in it or pass through it; and they shall be treated as friends while in it, and shall receive every supply they need there; they may freely practise the Christian religion there, and shall not be harmed or troubled on that account; and they may leave the country when they please.

[1850-51.]

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V. English people may always trade with the people of Nyanibantang in every article which they may wish to buy or sell; and neither the English people nor the people of Nyanibantang shall ever be forced to buy or sell any article, nor shall they be prevented from buying or selling any article; and the Chief agrees to allow the goods of English merchants to enter his territory free of duty, as long as the English shall receive the produce of his country free of duty.

VI. The paths shall be kept open through the Nyanibantang country to other countries, so that English traders may carry goods of all kinds through the Nyanibantang country to sell them elsewhere; and the traders of other countries may bring their goods through the Nyanibantang country to trade with the English people.

VII. English people may buy and sell, or hire lands and houses, in the Nyanibantang country; and their houses shall not be entered without their consent, nor shall their goods be seized, nor their persons touched; and if English people are wronged or ill-treated by the people of Nyanibantang, the Chief of Nyanibantang shall punish those who wrong or ill-treat English people.

VIII. But English people must not break the laws of the Nyanibantang country; and when they are accused of breaking the laws, the Chief shall send a true account of the matter to the nearest place where there is an English force, and the commander of such English force shall send for the English person, who shall be tried according to English law, and shall be punished if found guilty.

IX. If the Nyanibantang people should take away the property of an English person, the Chief of Nyanibantang shall do all he can to make the Nyanibantang people restore the property and pay the debt; and if English persons should take away the property of the Nyanibantang people, or should not pay their just debts to the Nyanibantang people, the Chief shall make known the fact to the commander of the English force nearest to the Nyanibantang country, or to the resident agent, if there is one; and the English commander or the agent, whichever it may be, shall do all he can to make the English persons restore the property and pay the debt.

X. The Queen of England may appoint an agent to visit Nyanibantang, or to reside there in order to watch over the interests of the English people, and to see that this agreement is fulfilled; and such agent shall always receive honour and protection in the Nyanibantang country; and the Nyanibantang Chief shall pay attention to what the agent says, and the person and property of the agent shall be sacred.

XI. The Chief of Nyanibantang shall, within 48 hours of the date of this agreement, make a law for carrying the whole of it into

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