D. H. Lawrence: The Early Philosophical Works

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Cambridge University Press, 1992. jan. 31. - 476 oldal
This second volume of Michael Black's commentary on Lawrence's prose works concentrates on the extraordinary sequence of nonfiction texts written between 1913 and 1917: The "Foreword" to Sons and Lovers, Study of Thomas Hardy, Twilight in Italy, "The Crown," "The Reality of Peace." In all of them Lawrence was compulsively rewriting what he called "my philosophy." They are difficult works: highly metaphorical, in places prophetically expressionist, even surreal. This extended commentary makes sense of them, treating them as a succession of experimental writings that support each other, develop non-discursive modes of writing, and are linked by shared metaphors that reveal shared preoccupations. Black's highly useful analysis is like the close reading of poetry.
 

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Tartalomjegyzék

Introduction
1
PARTI
7
The old stable
11
2
41
My God I am myself
51
74
58
Things too wonderful for
74
The philosophical works
101
Work and the angel and the unbegotten hero
170
The axle and the wheel of eternity
177
Of being and not being
183
The light of the world
199
A nos moutons
205
Untitled
223
Twilight in Italy
228
The Crown
330

PART II
121
Foreword to Sons and Lovers
123
Study of Thomas Hardy
145
Of poppies and phoenixes and the beginning of the argument
149
Still introductory
157
Concerning six novels and the real tragedy
161
An attack on work and the money appetite
165
The Reality of Peace
399
Notes
445
170
447
183
448
Lawrence and Joachim
463
223
470
Copyright

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A szerzőről (1992)

D(avid) H(erbert) Lawrence was born on September 11, 1885. His father was a coal miner and Lawrence grew up in a mining town in England. He always hated the mines, however, and frequently used them in his writing to represent both darkness and industrialism, which he despised because he felt it was scarring the English countryside. Lawrence attended high school and college in Nottingham and, after graduation, became a school teacher in Croyden in 1908. Although his first two novels had been unsuccessful, he turned to writing full time when a serious illness forced him to stop teaching. Lawrence spent much of his adult life abroad in Europe, particularly Italy, where he wrote some of his most significant and most controversial novels, including Sons and Lovers and Lady Chatterly's Lover. Lawrence and his wife, Frieda, who had left her first husband and her children to live with him, spent several years touring Europe and also lived in New Mexico for a time. Lawrence had been a frail child, and he suffered much of his life from tuberculosis. Eventually, he retired to a sanitorium in Nice, France. He died in France in 1930, at age 44. In his relatively short life, he produced more than 50 volumes of short stories, poems, plays, essays, travel journals, and letters, in addition to the novels for which he is best known.

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