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How strange! that God should never for a moment forget, and leave His work unperformed! He is great and mighty, and is constantly present and constantly acting everywhere. We ought to adore Him for His greatness and majesty, love Him for His goodness, dread His displeasure, and ask His forgiveness and protection every day.

Every duty which we have to perform is enjoined upon us by the command of God; so that we cannot neglect any duty whatever, without disobeying Him. Now, the law of God clearly forbids all the sins of which we can be guilty against any one; so that we cannot do any wrong without disobeying Him. If a child be unjust to his playmate, he disobeys and displeases God. If he attempts to deceive his parents, he disobeys and displeases God. If he waste his time, or is insubordinate and troublesome at school, he disobeys and displeases God. Every offence which we can commit, small as well as great, is a transgression of His law; and we cannot be really happy, after we have committed such transgressions, until we obtain His forgiveness. We ought, therefore, to make it the great duty and business of our lives to secure and enjoy at all times the favour of Almighty God, our Father in heaven. We should seek His pardon for all our sins, go to Him always in all our trouble, look to Him for protection in danger, strength in temptation, comfort in sorrow, and peace and happiness in duty; and cultivate such constant habits of intercourse and communion with Him as shall enable us, under all the circumstances of life, to feel that He is our refuge and strength, and an ever-present help in time of trouble.—J. Abbott.

penitent; andHe loves and watches over nil His creati: to keep them from harm, and to make them happy: therefore we ought to love Him. He is always neiu ready to listen to us, to take care of us, and to be ou.' friend; we ought, therefore, to commune with Hi: day, to confess our sins, to thank Him for His favc>'. to ask His continued guidance and protection.

God is everywhere. If a boy plant a seer ground in the spring, there comes from it, in n a little sprout. There are two parts: the p for the root turns down, and grows into the grov part which is for the stem and leaves turns up. nr out into the air. How do the root and the s which way they each must grow? They do God is there, where you plant that seed

the growing of it; and all over this

cannot find a place where you can put in i

seed, but God will be always ready then

leaflets up and the root down. Did you ever feel your pi

know what it is occasio

blood, as it is driven

your hand. It is b

kept alive, and wan

beats its way thus ii

it should cease t

cold, and stiffen,

beat? Do you

its beating?

present v pulse to !>■ ever

Bt

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s, the fate of the city depended

the possession of this only

tt rising of the lower classes

Jack Cade's rebellion in 1540,

Baved as often as the ringleaders

Dridge, or were driven from it.

e Humphrey of Gloucester lay

»■ followers on the north, and the

I on the south side of the river, when

Le and nephew were on the very eve

<nui and political differences in a

the water of the Thames. Such

} were, however, happily of tolerably

i for many years, nay even for cen

e gates of the bridge were not closed

it was only at night that, in accordance

as, it was required that the draw

Irawn up, and the portcullis let down.

irnieation between Middlesex and Surrey

leans of ferry boats, which plied from

and were, from a very early period,

cial class of boatmen.—Dr. Pauli's Pictures

LXII. COWPER S TAME HAUES.

•en of a neighbour of mine had a leveret for a plaything; it was at that time about is old. Understanding better how to tease ireature than to feed it, and soon becoming leir charge, they readily consented that jh&yi ould offer it to my acceptance. It x* anij so,oa , long the neighbours that 1 was pldily consenDnuanc , and the consequence was that ;cceptance. .eaais.

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LESSON LXI. OLD LONDON BRIDGE.

London Bridge, which continued until the last century to be the only bridge of the city, was a very remarkable structure even in the middle ages, and it retained a character of great singularity up to recent times. After the Saxons, and the Romans probably still earlier, had possessed a wooden bridge at this spot, Henry II. began, in the year 1176, to construct a stone bridge, which, however, was not completed till the year 1209, under his son John. Injuries from fire and water, and inexperience in erecting so difficult a structure, must have made many alterations and restorations necessary, until at length the edifice was permanently completed, and raised upon twenty strong but irregular arches, made of solid freestone masonry, having a large drawbridge in the middle. The powerful stream now flowed backwards and forwards through these arches, while over the bridge itself there arose, in the course of time, a regular street, solid enough to support on both sides high and stately houses, and affording even sufficient room for a tournament, which was held upon its pavement in the year 1395. Almost in the centre stood a Gothic chapel, dedicated to St. Thomas, at which a priest regularly performed mass. Two solid fortified gateways, having battlements and a portcullis, closed the entrances at the northern and southern ends. It continued to be a custom for ages to adorn the battlements of these gates with the heads of traitors, stuck upon spikes; and from thence the heads of Llewillyn the last of the Welsh princes, the brave Wallace, the bold favourite Hugo Despencer, and many other heroes and ruffians, looked down upon the gay and busy crowd that passed

below. In unquiet times, the fate of the city depended in great measure upon the possession of this only bridge; while, in the great rising of the lower classes in the year 1381, and in Jack Cade's rebellion in 1540, London was lost and saved as often as the ringleaders became masters of the bridge, or were driven from it. In the year 1425, Duke Humphrey of Gloucester lay under arms with his followers on the north, and the Bishop of Winchester on the south side of the river, when it seemed as if the uncle and nephew were on the very eve of settling their personal and political differences in a bloody contest above the water of the Thames. Such occurrences as these were, however, happily of tolerably rare occurrence; and for many years, nay even for centuries together, the gates of the bridge were not closed against any foe. It was only at night that, in accordance with the regulations, it was required that the drawbridge should be drawn up, and the portcullis let down. All further communication between Middlesex and Surrey ■was effected by means of ferry boats, which plied from definite points, and were, from a very early period, worked by a special class of boatmen.—Dr. Paidi's Pictures of Old England.

LESSON LXII. COWPEK'S TAME HARES.

The children of a neighbour of mine had a leveret given them for a plaything; it was at that time about three months old. Understanding better how to tease the poor creature than to feed it, and soon becoming weary of their charge, they readily consented that their father should offer it to my acceptance. It was soon known among the neighbours that I was pleased with the present, and the consequence was that in a short

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