Oldalképek
PDF
ePub

web, and flies can-not? I think there must be some dif-fer-ence in their feet. The spiders can move a-bout very ea-si-ly in-deed, but the poor flies get en-tan-gled as soon as they try to walk upon the web, and then the spiders catch the flies and eat them. I think, if I were a fly, I should be very care-ful to keep out of the way of spiders' webs.—J. Abbott.

LESSON XXVIII.—BUTTERCUPS AND DAISIES.

But-ter-cups and dai-sies,

Oh, the pret-ty flowers,
Com-ing ere the spring-time,

To tell of sun-ny hours.
While the trees are leaf-less,

While the fields are bare,
But-ter-cups and dai-sies

Spring up here and there.

i • •. Lit-tle har-dy flowers,

Like to chil-dren poor,
Play-ing in their stur-dy health,

By their moth-er's door:
Pur-ple with the north wind,

Yet a-lert and bold;
Fear-ing not and car-ing not,

Though they be a-cold.

What to them is weath-er!

What are storm-y showers!
But-ter-cups and dai-sies,

Are these hu-man flowers!
He who gave them hard-ship,

And a life of care,
Gave them like-wise hard-y strength,

And pa-tient hearts to bear.

Wel-come, yel-low but-ter-cups,

Wel-corne, dai-sies white,
Ye are, in my spi-rit,

Vis-ion'd a de-light:
Com-ing ere the spring-time,

Of sun-ny hours to tell—
Speak-ing to our hearts of Him

Who do-eth all things well.Mrs. Homtt.

LESSON XXIX. TREES.

A tree has roots that go un-der the ground a great ■Way. The roots are like its legs: the tree could not stand with-out them. Then the tree has a trunk; a large, thick, straight trunk. That is its bod-y. Then the tree has branch-es. Those are like arms; they spread out very far. Then there are boughs; and up-on the boughs leaves and blos-soms. Here is a blos-som up-on the ap-ple-tree. Will the blos-som bo al-ways up-on the tree? No, it will fall off soon: per-haps it will fall off to-night. But then do you know what comes in-stead of the blos-som? What? The fruit. After the ap-ple blos-soms there will be ap-ples. Then, if the blos-soms fall off to-night, shall I come here and get an ap-ple to-mor-row? No, you must have pa-tience; there will not be ripe ap-ples a great while yet. There will be first a lit-tle, lit-tle thing, hard-ly big-ger than a pin's head: that will swell and grow big-ger ev-er-y day, and hard-er, till at last it will come to be a great ap-ple. But you must not eat it yet: you must let it hang till the sun has made it red, and till you can pull it off ea-si-ly. Now it is ripe; it is as red as your cheeks. Now gath-er it and eat it. Has the flower roots too? Yes: here is a cow-slip;

web, and flies can-not? I think there must be some dif-fer-ence in their feet. The spiders can move a-bout very ea-si-ly in-deed, but the poor flies get en-tan-gled as soon as they try to walk upon the web, and then the spiders catch the flies and eat them. I think, if I were a fly, I should be very care-ful to keep out of the way of spiders' webs.-J. Abbott.

LESSON XXVIII.—BUTTERCUPS AND DAISIES.

But-ter-cups and dai-sies,

Oh, the pret-ty flowers,
Com-ing ere the spring-time,

To tell of sun-ny hours.
While the trees are leaf-less,

While the fields are bare,
But-ter-cups and dai-sies

Spring up here and there.
Lit-tle har-dy flowers,

Like to chil-dren poor,
Play-ing in their stur-dy health,

By their moth-er's door:
Pur-ple with the north wind,

Yet a-lert and bold;
..... Fear-ing not and car-ing not,

Though they be a-cold.
What to them is weath-er !

What are storm-y showers !
But-ter-cups and dai-sies,

Are these hu-man flowers !
He who gave them hard-ship,

And a life of care,
Gave them like-wise hard-y strength,

And pa-tient hearts to bear.

Wel-come, yel-low but-ter-cups,

Wel-come, dai-sies white,
Ye are, in my spi-rit,

Vis-ion'd a de-light:
Com-ing ere the spring-time,

Of sun-ny hours to tell—
Speak-ing to our hearts of Him

Who do-eth all things well.Mrs. Howitt.

LESSON XXIX.—TREES.

A tree has roots that go un-der the ground a great Way. The roots are like its legs: the tree could not stand without them. Then the tree has a trunk; a large, thick, straight trunk. That is its bod-y. Then the tree has branch-es. Those are like arms; they spread out very far. Then there are boughs; and up-on the boughs leaves and blos-soms. Here is a blos-som up-on the ap-ple-tree. Will the blos-som bo al-ways up-on the tree? No, it will fall off soon: per-haps it will fall off to-night. But then do you know what comes in-stead of the blos-som? What? The fruit. After the ap-ple blos-soms there will be ap-ples. Then, if the blos-soms fall off to-night, shall I come here and get an ap-ple to-mor-row? No, you must have pa-tience; there will not be ripe ap-ples a great while yet. There will be first a lit-tle, lit-tle thing, hard-ly big-ger than a pin's head: that will swell and grow big-ger ev-er-y day, and hard-er, till at last it will come to be a great ap-ple. But you must not eat it yet: you must let it hang till the sun has made it red, and till you can pull it off ea-si-ly. Now it is ripe; it is as red as your cheeks. Now gath-er it and eat it.

Has the flower roots too? Yes: here is a cow-slip; we will pull it up. See, here are roots like strings; here is the stem of the cow-slip; here is the foot-stool; here is the flower cup; here are the leaves of the flower; and a pret-ty flower it is; fine yel-low -with. cr.im-son spots. Here are the seeds. If the seeds are put in the ground when they are ripe, an-oth-er flower will grow up.—Mrs. Barbauld.

LESSON XXX.—THE CREATION—FIFTH DAY.

God had made a great many things; but none of these things were a-live. At last He made some liv-ing things. He spoke, and the wa-ter was filled with fish-es, more than could be count-ed.

Some were very small, and some were very large. Have you heard of the great whale? Fish-es are cold, and they have no feet, and they can-not sing, nor speak.

God made some crea-tures more beau-ti-ful than fish, to fly out of the wa-ter. The birds:—they perched up-on the trees, and sang a-mong the branch-es.

Birds have wings, and are cov-ered with feath-ers of all col-ours. The rob-in has a red breast; the goldfinch has some yel-low feath-ers; and the jay some blue ones: but the pea-cock is the most beau-ti-ful of birds. It has a lit-tle tuft up-on its head, and a long train that sweeps be-hind; some-times it spreads out its feath-ers, and they look like a large fan. The thrush, the blackbird, and the lin-net, can sing sweet-ly; but there is one bird that can sing more ssveet-ly still—it is the night-ingale. At night, when all the other birds have left off sing-ing, the night-in-gale may be heard in the woods.

Some birds swim up-on the wa-ter; such as geese, and ducks, and the swan with its long neck, and its feath-ers like the snow.

« ElőzőTovább »