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BEING PART IV OF THE EIGHTY-FIRST ANNUAL REPORT OF THE
REGENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY.

ALBANY:

CHARLES VAN BENTHUYSEN & SONS.
1878.

CONTEXTS.
C

PAGE.

I. Sketch of the Origin. Objects ami Plan of the University Convocation. (Re-

printed from former years) 3

II. Minutes of the Thirteenth Anniversary. July 10th. 11th and 12th, 1877 5

University Control. By Professor Alexander Winchell, LL. D.. of the'Univer-

sity of Syracuse 23

The Study of Romjui Law in Collegiate Education. By Professor William C.

Morey, A. M.. of the University of Rochester 33

Earthquakes. By Principal Solomon Sias, A. M., M. D., of Schoharie Union

School 40

The State and Secondary Education. By Principal Albert B. Watkins. Ph. D..

of Hungerford Collegiate Institute 43

Higher Examinations. By Chancellor Erastus O. Haven. D. D.. LL. D.. of Syra-

cuse University '.... 49

Regents' Examinations in Academic Studies. By Principal John E. Bradley,

A. 51., of Albany High School 53

American Educators in India. By Rev. Royal G. Wilder, A. M.. of Kolapoor,

India 60

Construction of Latin Prepositions with Cases. By Principal Ezra J. Peck,

A. M., of Homer Academy and Union School 68

Culture and Limitation. By Professor John James Lewis. A. M., Madison Uni-

versity 71

The Uses and Relations of the Study of Botany. By Principal M. A. Veeder.

Ives Seminary, Antwerp 81

A Plan to Harmonize Our Public School System. By Principal John W. Arm-

strong. D. D.. of the Fredonia Normal School 8o

Psychological Aspects of Education. By Brother Azarias, Professor in Rock

Hill College. Ellicott City. Md ". 89

Expression in Reading; Its Philosophy and Application. By Miss Mary F.

Hendrick, of the Cortland Normal School 96

On the Basis of Courses of Study in Schools—Whether they Should Rest Upon

the Developing Man as Man, or Man as a Member of Society. By Principal

James H. Hoose. A. M.. Ph. D.. of the Cortland Normal School . ..'. 105

On Co-operation in Indexing and Cataloguing College Libraries. Report of the

Committee appointed August, 1876 114

University Necrology 119

Abstract of Memoir of Professor Tayler Lewis. By President Eliphalet Nott

Potter, D. D.. LL. D.. of Union College 119

Professor J. Graeff Barton, LL. D. By Eustace W. Fisher. A. M.. M. D 127

Tmstee John McGraw. By Professor William D. Wilson, D.D., LL. D., L. H. D. 128

Principal Benjamin Richards, A. M. By Noah T. Clarke. Ph. D 130

Officers and Registered Members of the University Convocation. 1S77 131

Errata '. 134

IV. THE UNIVERSITY CONVOCATION

STATE OF NEW YORK.

I. SKETCH OF ITS ORIGIN, OBJECTS AND PLAN.

[Reprinted from the Proceedings of former years. by direction of the Convocation.]

At a meeting of the Regents of the University, held on the 9th day of January, 1863, the reports of colleges and academies, and their mutual relations, being under consideration, the following resolution was unanimously adopted:

Resolved, That it is expedient to hold annually, under the direction of this Board, a meeting of officers of colleges and academies, and that a committee be appointed to draft a programme of business for the proposed meeting to fix the time and place, and to make such other arrangements as they may deem necessary.

The committee of arrangements on the part of the Regents were Chancellor Pruyn, Governor Seymour, Mr. Benedict, Mr. Hawley, Mr. Clinton, Mr. Perkins and Secretary Woolworth.

The meeting was held according to appointment, on the 4th and 5th days of August, 1863. Chancellor Pruyn briefly stated the objects entertained by the Regents, which were mainly "to consider the mutual relations of colleges and academies, and to promote, as largely as possible, the cause of liberal education in our State. While it is a part of the duty of the Regents of the University to visit the fourteen * literary colleges, and more than two hundred academies subject to their supervision, it is obvious that this cannot be done as frequently as desirable, and that some such method as is now proposed, whereby teachers may compare views with each other, and with the Regents, and discuss methods of instruction and general modes of procedure, is alike practiable and necessary.

"A law enacted more than three-fourths of a century ago was cited, by which the University was organized and clothed with power similar to those held by the Universities of Cambridge and Oxford, in England.

* Now twenty-three (1877).

[convocation, Sia. 1.]

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